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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Tennessee, United States) or search for Jackson (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The historical basis of Whittier's <persName n="Frietchie,,Barbara,,," id="n0044.0081.00618.13102" reg="default:Frietchie,Barbara,,," authname="frietchie,barbara"><foreName full="yes">Barbara</foreName> <surname full="yes">Frietchie</surname></persName>. (search)
eirlooms. This flag which Mrs. Handschue and her daughter so religiously preserve is torn, but the banner was not rent with seam and gash from a rifle-blast; it is torn — only this and nothing more. That Mrs. Frietchie did not wave the flag at Jackson's men Mrs. Handschue positively affirms. The flag-waving act was done, however, by Mrs. Mary S. Quantrell, another Frederick woman; but Jackson took no notice of it, and as Mrs. Quantrell was not fortunate enough to find a poet to celebrate herhe century for June, 1886, that Jackson never saw Barbara Frietchie, and that Barbara never saw Jackson. This story is borne out by Mrs. Frietchie's relatives. As already said, Barbara Frietchie had a flag and she waved it, not on the 6th to Jackson's men, but on the 12th to Burnside's. Here is the story as told by Mrs. Abbott, Mrs. Handschue's daughter: Jackson and his men had been in Frederick and had left a short time before. We were glad that the rebels had gone and that our troops
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in Maryland. (search)
uffered.--extract from a letter written by Lieut. Robert Healy, of Jackson's corps. On the 3d of September, 1862, the Federal army under im with smiles and embraces and questions, and then jumped into Jackson's men wading the Potomac at White's Ford. Lieutenant Robert Hea's Ferry and Sharpsburg proved the wisdom of Hill's request and of Jackson's compliance with it.) During the 14th, while Jackson was fixin Grant afterward gave Lee at Appomattox. Of the expectations of Jackson's men, Lieutenant Robert Healy says, in a letter written in 1886: ions of Meade, Doubleday, and Ricketts, struck the first blow, and Jackson's old division caught it and struck back again. Between such foesext Mansfield entered the fight, and beat with resistless might on Jackson's people. The battle here grew angry and bloody. Starke was killith tried his luck and was repulsed. Sumner then ordered a halt. Jackson's fight was over, and a strange silence reigned around Dunker Chur
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
marked A on the map. Hood was relieved by two brigades of Jackson's corps, which was in and behind the Dunker Church wood (oburg. Toombs, and the arriving brigades of A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, saved the village and regained a part of the lostision had been so severely handled that it was replaced by Jackson's (commanded by J. R. Jones), which, with Ewell's, had bee Church. Stuart says he had batteries from all parts of Jackson's command, and mentions Poague's, Pegram's, and Carringtonpose, had cost the enemy dear. J. R. Jones, who commanded Jackson's division, had been wounded; Starke, who succeeded Jones,en. Nearly half their numbers were killed and wounded, and Jackson's famous Stonewall division was so completely disorganizedd to be A. P. Hill's division of six brigades, the last of Jackson's force to leave Harper's Ferry, and which had reached Shaon had been left north-east of Maryland Heights to observe Jackson's command, supposed still to be in Harper's Ferry. Why co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
extending toward the Hagerstown-Sharpsburg pike, and Jackson extended out from Hill's left toward the Potomac. The battle opened, heavily with the attacks of the corps of Hooker, Mansfield, and Sumner against our left center, which consisted of Jackson's right and D. H. Hill's left. So severe and persistent were these attacks that I was obliged to send Hood to support our center. The Federals forced us back a little, however, and held this part of our position to the end of the day's work. s Ferry, although the greater danger was with McLaws, whose service was the severer and more important. Lee lost nearly 20,000 by straggling in this campaign,--almost twice as many as were captured at Harper's Ferry. The battle casualties of Jackson's command from the Rappahannock to the Potomac, according to the Official Records, were 4629, while mine, including those of R. H. Anderson's division, were 4725, making in all, 9354. That taken from the army of 55,000 at the Second Manassas le
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.77 (search)
n three, and still Stuart made no sign. About half-past 3 a staff-officer of General Longstreet brought me an order from that general to advance and attack the enemy in my front. As the execution of this order would materially interfere with Jackson's plans, I thought it my duty before beginning the movement to communicate with General Longstreet personally. I found him in rear of the position in which I had posted Cooke in the morning, and upon informing him of Jackson's intentions, he wiJackson's intentions, he withdrew his order. While we were discussing this subject, Jackson himself joined us with the information of Stuart's failure to turn the Federal right, for the reason that he had found it securely posted on the Potomac. Upon my expressing surprise at this statement, Jackson replied that he also had been surprised, as he had supposed the Potomac much farther away; but he remarked that Stuart had an excellent eye for topography, and it must be as he represented. He added: It is a great pity,--
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
Mississippi from Paducah to Columbus, and at Jackson, Bethel, and other places on the Mississippi nsiderably east of south, passes through Jackson, Tennessee, Bethel, Corinth, Tupelo, and Baldwyn, M Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar a General Grant moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th ofA. Davies. From a photograph. miles north to Jackson, on the Mobile and Ohio railway, with all thet's,--in line, with reserves in rear of each; Jackson's cavalry was on the right en échelon, the lees in line of battle and one in reserve, with Jackson's cavalry to the right, was ordered to await the pursuit. General McPherson, sent from Jackson with five good regiments to help us, arrived ridge]. General Ord, arriving there from Jackson, Tennessee, assumed command and drove back Groupr with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With these there w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
Mississippi from Paducah to Columbus, and at Jackson, Bethel, and other places on the Mississippi nsiderably east of south, passes through Jackson, Tennessee, Bethel, Corinth, Tupelo, and Baldwyn, M Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar a General Grant moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th ofA. Davies. From a photograph. miles north to Jackson, on the Mobile and Ohio railway, with all thet's,--in line, with reserves in rear of each; Jackson's cavalry was on the right en échelon, the lees in line of battle and one in reserve, with Jackson's cavalry to the right, was ordered to await the pursuit. General McPherson, sent from Jackson with five good regiments to help us, arrived ridge]. General Ord, arriving there from Jackson, Tennessee, assumed command and drove back Groupr with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With these there w
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