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Doherty (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
U. S. V. Fort Monroe--and the old Hygeia Hotel, since torn down. From a Lithograph.On the 24th of May, 1861, I arrived at Fort Monroe, with my regiment, the 2d New York Volunteers. Two days before Major-General B. F. Butler had arrived and assumed command of the department. Previous to our arrival the fort contained, besides the regular garrison of four companies of artillery, the 4th Massachusetts Volunteers, a regiment of three-months men. We went into camp just over the border of Mill Creek, a stream dividing the fort from Virginia, and pitched our tents on a plowed field near a mansion known as the Segar House. This camp was first called Camp Troy, and, later, Camp Hamilton. Pickets were placed immediately on our arrival, and at once began operations by the capture of nine Confederate officers--one of them a surgeon. The prisoners were brought before General Butler, confessed to being in arms under the Confederacy, and stated that, when captured, they were on their way to
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
s at Camp Hamilton be at once ordered to Norfolk, and that the troops already there be pushed rapidly forward. The order was issued, and I reported to General Viele at Norfolk and was assigned to the command of the exterior lines of defense at Portsmouth. The delays occurring in forwarding and pushing the troops allowed the Confederates time to burn the Navy Yard at Portsmouth, and to destroy the shipping. These troops remained at Norfolk until about June 1st, when we received orders to reporral Viele at Norfolk and was assigned to the command of the exterior lines of defense at Portsmouth. The delays occurring in forwarding and pushing the troops allowed the Confederates time to burn the Navy Yard at Portsmouth, and to destroy the shipping. These troops remained at Norfolk until about June 1st, when we received orders to report to McClellan at Fair Oaks. General Wool was relieved of his command soon after the affair at Norfolk, and General John A. Dix was appointed in his stead.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. Joseph B. Carr, Brevet Major-General, U. S. V. Fort Fort Monroe--and the old Hygeia Hotel, since torn down. From a Lithograph.On the 24th of May, 1861, I ay and literally fell from their bodies. In Fort Monroe men in the 2d New York Volunteers appeared clared contraband of war, 1.-light-house, Fort Monroe. 2.-Chesapeake hospital, Hampton, Va. 3.-Sally-Port, Fort Monroe. From War-time photographs. Arrival of the original contraband. from a We in which General Butler was in command at Fort Monroe, he developed remarkable ability in civil oB. C. Among other prominent soldiers at Fort Monroe, at this time, was General J. W. Phelps, th--J. B. C. Camp of Duryea's Zouaves, near Fort Monroe. From a sketch made in July, 1861. On d an order to go at once to headquarters at Fort Monroe. Arriving at General Butler's quarters, heneral Mansfield and myself were summoned to Fort Monroe by President Lincoln. Arriving there, Linc[4 more...]
Troy, Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
tors, and the lack of experience and celerity in the subordinates of the Quartermaster-General's department at Washington. Among the liveliest soldiers encamped on any field were our neighbors Duryea's Zouaves. The Confederates had dubbed this regiment, from their baggy red trousers and reckless bearing the red-legged devils, and had invested them with the characteristics of the Bashi-Bazouks. A private letter from a Confederate, read in camp, said: We have no tear or your New York, Troy, Vermont, or Massachusetts men, but I own that we do not want to meet those red-legged devils around our houses or hen-coops. It was a well-known fact that the Zouaves' rations included chicken, roast pig, ham, corn, and other first-class food. By the verdict of numerous squads in all the regiments, many articles of food near at hand were declared contraband of war, 1.-light-house, Fort Monroe. 2.-Chesapeake hospital, Hampton, Va. 3.-Sally-Port, Fort Monroe. From War-time photographs. Arr
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
blockade of the James River, prepared for an attempt to recapture Norfolk. President Lincoln, with Secretaries Stanton and Chase, came toly entered the intrenchments of the enemy unopposed. The mayor of Norfolk met General Wool and formally surrendered the city. While our tro, and the 9th Massachusetts.) Why are you not on the other side at Norfolk? I am awaiting orders. Turning to Mansfield, Lincoln said, Why a Wool requiring that troops at Camp Hamilton be at once ordered to Norfolk, and that the troops already there be pushed rapidly forward. The order was issued, and I reported to General Viele at Norfolk and was assigned to the command of the exterior lines of defense at Portsmouth.Portsmouth, and to destroy the shipping. These troops remained at Norfolk until about June 1st, when we received orders to report to McClellat Fair Oaks. General Wool was relieved of his command soon after the affair at Norfolk, and General John A. Dix was appointed in his stead.
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
made he succeeded in overruling them [see p. 123]. After the battle between the Monitor and Merrimac [see Vol. I., p. 692], General Wool, seeing the advantage of opening the blockade of the James River, prepared for an attempt to recapture Norfolk. President Lincoln, with Secretaries Stanton and Chase, came to Fort Monroe, and on May 8th, 1862, the order was given and a movement made. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, who had been ordered to assist, attacked the Confederate batteries at Sewell's Point retired, and for the hour, at least, the expedition was abandoned. News came to headquarters later in the day that General Huger was preparing to retire, and General Wool, after a trip to Willoughby's Point, decided to land his troops at Ocean View, thus taking in reverse the Confederate works. The landing of our troops was easily effected, and had more energy been displayed it is doubtful whether the enemy would have had time and opportunity to commit to the flames so much valuable ma
Hampton Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
dy, which was given to his friends. Among the incidents of this skirmish, none is more indelibly impressed on my mind than the gallant bearing of this unfortunate young man, when I first saw him, calling his men to follow, and confident that he had accomplished his object. Editors. Although unattached to any regiment, he had volunteered for the expedition, and was killed while far in advance of the troops, and within one hundred yards of the enemy's works. General Butler arrived at Hampton Creek in time to meet the men coming in, but saw no part of the engagement. Among the first officers met by Butler were a major and lieutenant-colonel from one of the regiments engaged. Both were seated in a carriage driving leisurely home. Butler noticed the odd style of retreat, and also that there was crockery in the bottom of the carriage. The effects of this battle have been variously stated. Save as an encouragement to the Confederates, it had no important result. After the battl
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
1861 I was ordered, with my regiment, the 2d New York, to report to General Stone for duty in operations about Ball's Bluff, but Colonel E. D. Baker, with his regiment, was sent in my place. It appeared, later, that Colonel Baker had desired that he should be substituted, and when objections were made he succeeded in overruling them [see p. 123]. After the battle between the Monitor and Merrimac [see Vol. I., p. 692], General Wool, seeing the advantage of opening the blockade of the James River, prepared for an attempt to recapture Norfolk. President Lincoln, with Secretaries Stanton and Chase, came to Fort Monroe, and on May 8th, 1862, the order was given and a movement made. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, who had been ordered to assist, attacked the Confederate batteries at Sewell's Point retired, and for the hour, at least, the expedition was abandoned. News came to headquarters later in the day that General Huger was preparing to retire, and General Wool, after a trip to Wi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
en during the early days of the civil war was made of the vilest shoddy and literally fell from their bodies. In Fort Monroe men in the 2d New York Volunteers appeared on parade with blankets wrapped about them to conceal a lack of proper garments, and sometimes stood sentinel with naked feet and almost naked bodies. The only reason for this hardship was the dishonesty of contractors, and the lack of experience and celerity in the subordinates of the Quartermaster-General's department at Washington. Among the liveliest soldiers encamped on any field were our neighbors Duryea's Zouaves. The Confederates had dubbed this regiment, from their baggy red trousers and reckless bearing the red-legged devils, and had invested them with the characteristics of the Bashi-Bazouks. A private letter from a Confederate, read in camp, said: We have no tear or your New York, Troy, Vermont, or Massachusetts men, but I own that we do not want to meet those red-legged devils around our houses or hen
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.18
apeake hospital, Hampton, Va. 3.-Sally-Port, Fort Monroe. From War-time photographs. Arrival of the original contraband. from a War-time sketch on the ground that if left on farms or in gardens aid and comfort to the enemy might ensue. There were few cases of real lawlessness, consequently the Beauty and Booty proclamation This proclamation by General Beauregard was dated Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, June 5th, 1861, and was addressed To the Good People of the Counties of Loudoun, Fairfax, and Prince William, in which, referring to the Union forces, he says: All rules of civilized warfare are abandoned, and they proclaim by their acts, if not on their banners, that their war-cry is Beauty and Booty. --Editors. of General Beauregard was uncalled for, and even in the vague and uncertain light of that day was absurd. The negroes in Virginia, learning of our presence, began to arrive at our camp in large numbers. While other commanders were hesitating and quibbling
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