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Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 5
25th of August, 1862, Stonewall Jackson, with Ewell's and A. P. Hill's divisions and his own old dGeneral Henry Horno's (Hays's) brigade, of General Ewell's division, however, quickly reinforcing hments. A. P. Hill was ordered to Centreville, Ewell to cross Bull Run at Blackburn's Ford and follckson's men had streamed along its highway. Ewell's division was in rear of mine, both lines fro products. They went and returned just as General Ewell happened to ride to the front. He heard tes, however, bearing off the spolia opima. General Ewell reaped the fruits of the contest, for he ooth sides. On ours, both division commanders, Ewell and myself, were seriously wounded, and severaart in the conflict, Lawton's and Trimble's of Ewell's, and Starke's, Taliaferro's, and Baylor's, oraid consisted of three divisions, as follows: Ewell's division, composed of the brigades of Lawtonackson had his own division and that of General R. S. Ewell, and later A. P. Hill was sent to reinf[4 more...]
William S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 5
ill the opening of the Civil War. When he assumed command of the Army of Virginia he was in the prime of life, less than forty years old, and had lost little if any of the dash and grace of his youth. D. H. Hill, Lafayette McLaws, Mansfield Lovell, Gustavus W. Smith, R. H. Anderson, A. P. Stewart, and Earl Van Dorn were among the Confederate commanders who were graduated in the same class with me. Of the Federal commanders, there were of that class — besides Pope--Generals John Newton, W. S. Rosecrans, George Sykes, Abner Doubleday, and others less prominent. Stonewall Jackson came on four years after my class. General Lee had preceded us about fourteen years. General Ewell, who was hurt in this battle, was in the same class with Tecumseh Sherman and George H. Thomas. A truer soldier and nobler spirit than Ewell never drew sword. Jeb Stuart was a very daring fellow and the best cavalryman America ever produced. At the Second Manassas, soon after we heard of the advance of McDo
William T. Poague (search for this): chapter 5
at Antietam; then the Georgia brigade, commanded by General Alexander R. Lawton; and upon the extreme left General I. R. Trimble's brigade of Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Alabama troops. The batteries engaged were those of Wooding, Poague, and Carpenter, much outnumbered by the Federal guns, but, toward the close of the contest, ably supplemented by two pieces brought to their support by the boy-major Pelham, of Stuart's Horse Artillery, already famous for his skill and gallantry.idson, and Pegram; and Jackson's old division consisted of the brigades of Starke, Taliaferro (Col. A. G. Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbell's brigade. General Stuart, with the brigades of Fitz Lee and Robertson, cooperated with Jackson.--W. B. T. The march and the manoeuvres of Jac
John Pope (search for this): chapter 5
mself north of Bull Run and await the coming of Pope,--who he believed would retreat along the line ably taken in March, 1862. Our March against Pope. as they floated high up in the air, well out ooldiers a maxim: Don't despise your enemy. General Pope's words would seem to indicate great contemce preparations for a vigorous campaign against Pope. Divisions under Generals R. H. Anderson, Lafaperhaps fifteen miles away, we saw the flags of Pope's army floating placidly above the tops of the me a dispatch to General Stuart was captured by Pope, which gave information of our presence and conge in his front. On the afternoon of the 26th, Pope's army broke away from its strong position to m until at 10 o'clock at night we had the field; Pope was across Bull Run, and the victorious Confedeble force he might have overwhelmed him. General Pope, sanguine by nature, was not careful enoughld have been under a fire from the batteries on Pope's front as severe as the raking fire from my ba[40 more...]
Richard H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 5
unused to. At that time General Lee was feeling very certain that Richmond was in no immediate danger from an advance by McClellan's forces. He therefore began at once preparations for a vigorous campaign against Pope. Divisions under Generals R. H. Anderson, Lafayette McLaws, J. G. Walker, and D. H. Hill were left to watch McClellan, with instructions to follow the main body of the army as soon as the Federals were drawn away from Westover. On the 13th of August my command was ordered toil War. When he assumed command of the Army of Virginia he was in the prime of life, less than forty years old, and had lost little if any of the dash and grace of his youth. D. H. Hill, Lafayette McLaws, Mansfield Lovell, Gustavus W. Smith, R. H. Anderson, A. P. Stewart, and Earl Van Dorn were among the Confederate commanders who were graduated in the same class with me. Of the Federal commanders, there were of that class — besides Pope--Generals John Newton, W. S. Rosecrans, George Sykes, Abn
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 5
away off to the Confederate right, and the sounds of sharp but distant explosions coming to our ears, foretold the passage of Thoroughfare Gap; and the next day, before noon, Longstreet's advance, under Hood, mingled their hurrahs with those of our men. Jackson's force in this raid consisted of three divisions, as follows: Ewell's division, composed of the brigades of Lawton, Early, Hayes (Forno commanding), and Trimble, with the batteries of Brown, Dement, Latimer, Balthus, and D'Acquin; Hill's division, of the brigades of Branch, Gregg, Field, Pender, Archer, and Thomas, with the batteries of Braxton, Latham, Crenshaw, McIntosh, Davidson, and Pegram; and Jackson's old division consisted of the brigades of Starke, Taliaferro (Col. A. G. Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbe
George W. Wooding (search for this): chapter 5
fterward at Antietam; then the Georgia brigade, commanded by General Alexander R. Lawton; and upon the extreme left General I. R. Trimble's brigade of Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Alabama troops. The batteries engaged were those of Wooding, Poague, and Carpenter, much outnumbered by the Federal guns, but, toward the close of the contest, ably supplemented by two pieces brought to their support by the boy-major Pelham, of Stuart's Horse Artillery, already famous for his skill and gd Pegram; and Jackson's old division consisted of the brigades of Starke, Taliaferro (Col. A. G. Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbell's brigade. General Stuart, with the brigades of Fitz Lee and Robertson, cooperated with Jackson.--W. B. T. The march and the manoeuvres of Jackson had
John Seddon (search for this): chapter 5
ll's division, composed of the brigades of Lawton, Early, Hayes (Forno commanding), and Trimble, with the batteries of Brown, Dement, Latimer, Balthus, and D'Acquin; Hill's division, of the brigades of Branch, Gregg, Field, Pender, Archer, and Thomas, with the batteries of Braxton, Latham, Crenshaw, McIntosh, Davidson, and Pegram; and Jackson's old division consisted of the brigades of Starke, Taliaferro (Col. A. G. Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbell's brigade. General Stuart, with the brigades of Fitz Lee and Robertson, cooperated with Jackson.--W. B. T. The march and the manoeuvres of Jackson had been a success; The results of Jackson's raid on Manassas Junction were reported by General R. E. Lee to be--eight pieces of artillery, with their horses and equipments, wer
George R. Gaither (search for this): chapter 5
in 1884. (see maps, pp. 473, 509.) turnpike near that place. Stuart had already placed a small cavalry force on this road and north of it, at Hay Market. Johnson, holding Groveton as his reserve, picketed the road as directed, pushed Captain George R. Gaither's troop of cavalry, which he found on picket, still farther on in the direction of Warrenton, and made dispositions to prevent surprise, and to check, if necessary, any advance of the enemy. Ewell's division having now come up and united with the troops of my command, Jackson determined to rest and await further developments. Captain Gaither had the good fortune to capture a courier conveying a dispatch from General McDowell to Generals Sigel and Reynolds, which revealed General Pope's intention of concentrating on Manassas Junction, Sigel being ordered to march on that point from Gainesville, with his right resting on the Manassas Gap Railroad; Reynolds, also from Gainesville, to keep his left on the Warrenton road; an
S. P. Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 5
d in the consciousness of security. The Federal commander, around whose flank and rear fourteen brigades of infantry, two of cavalry, and eighteen light batteries had passed, was also resting-but in profound ignorance. On the 26th he ordered Heintzelman The Stone Bridge, Bull Run, from the North bank. From a sketch made in 1884. to send a regiment from Warrenton to Manassas, to repair the wires and protect the railroad. Aroused, however, on the evening of the 27th, to some appreciation of the condition of affairs, he sent one division (Hookers) of Heintzelman's corps to Bristoe, which attacked the brigades of Lawton, Early, and Forno (Hays's) of Ewell's division, who successively retired, as they had been directed to do, with little loss, upon the main body at Manassas Junction. At his leisure, Jackson now proceeded to execute his projected movements. A. P. Hill was ordered to Centreville, Ewell to cross Bull Run at Blackburn's Ford and follow the stream to the stone b
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