hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 1,246 6 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 888 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 773 5 Browse Search
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) 446 10 Browse Search
Irvin McDowell 422 4 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 410 4 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 376 6 Browse Search
John Pope 355 5 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 349 1 Browse Search
Fitz John Porter 346 18 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

Found 894 total hits in 203 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
lso known that there were intrenched positions of more or less strength at Young's Mills, on the Newport News road, and at Big Bethel, Howard's Bridge, and Ship's Point, on or near the Hampton and Yorktown road, and at Williamsburg [see map, p. 188]. On my arrival at Fort Monroe, I learned, in an interview with Flag--Officer Goldsborough, that he could not protect the James as a line of supply, and that he could furnish no vessels to take an active part in the reduction of the batteries at York and Gloucester or to run by and gain their rear. He could only aid in the final attack after our land batteries had essentially silenced their fire. I thus found myself with 53,000 men in condition to move, faced by the conditions of the problem just stated. Information was received that Yorktown was already being reenforced from Norfolk, and it was apprehended that the main Confederate army would promptly follow the same course. I therefore determined to move at once with the force in
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
e, to land a little below Yorktown to turn the defenses between that place and Fort Monroe. The Navy Department were confident that we could rely upon their vessels to neutralize the Merrimac and aid materially in reducing the batteries on the York River, either by joining in the attack or by running by them and gaining their rear. As transports arrived very slowly, especially those for horses, and the great impatience of the Government grew apace, it became necessary to embark divisions as fadvance, except where Hancock broke through, until the night of the 5th, when they retired [see map, p. 188]. The army was now divided: a part at the mouth of the Pamunkey, a part at Williamsburg, and a part at Yorktown prepared to ascend the York River. The problem was to reunite them without giving the enemy the opportunity of striking either fraction with his whole force. This was accomplished on the 10th, when all the divisions were in communication, and the movement of concentration con
Gloucester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
ing Fort Monroe and its vicinity the base of operations. The plan first adopted was to commence the movement with the First Corps as a unit, to land north of Gloucester and move thence on West Point; or, should circumstances render it advisable, to land a little below Yorktown to turn the defenses between that place and Fort Modivisions as fast as vessels arrived, and I decided to land them at Fort Monroe, holding the First Corps to the last, still intending to move it in mass to turn Gloucester. On the 17th of March the leading division embarked at Alexandria. The campaign was undertaken with the intention of taking some 145,000 troops, to be increasat he could not protect the James as a line of supply, and that he could furnish no vessels to take an active part in the reduction of the batteries at York and Gloucester or to run by and gain their rear. He could only aid in the final attack after our land batteries had essentially silenced their fire. I thus found myself wi
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
cretary before leaving Washington, providing for precisely such a contingency. While at Harper's Ferry I learned that the President was dissatisfied with my action, and on reaching Washington I laid a full explanation before the Secretary, with which he expressed himself entirely satisfied, and told me that the President was already so, and that it was unnecessary for me to communicate with him on the subject. I then proceeded with the preparations necessary to force the evacuation of the Potomac batteries. On the very day appointed for the division commanders to come to headquarters to receive their final orders, the President sent for me. I then learned that he had received no explanation of the Harper's Ferry affair, and that the Secretary was not authorized to make the statement already referred to; but after my repetition of it the President became fully satisfied with my course. He then, however, said that there was another very ugly matter which he desired to talk about, an
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
the ground subsequently occupied by the depot at White House. The only territory remaining under my command ws of Franklin, Porter, and Smith were advanced to White House, and a depot established. On the 18th the Fifth on the one hand, and, on the other, the line from White House as a base, crossing the upper Chickahominy. Thquired me to supply his troops from our depots at White House. Herein lay the failure of the campaign, as it nph. we were now [middle of May] encamped [near White House] on the old Custis place, at present owned by Geno difficult for the free movements of troops. White House, the home of General W. H. F. Lee, McClellan's baside of the Chickahominy, Porter's Ruins of the White House, which was burned June 28, during the change of bs were given for the defense of the depots at the White House to the last moment and its final destruction and , in rear. The supplies which had been sent from White House on the 18th were at hand in the James. after c
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
nt or by draft, a spasmodic system of large drafts was thereafter resorted to, and, to a great extent, the system of forming new regiments. The results were wasteful and pernicious. There were enough, or nearly enough, organizations in the field, and these should have been constantly maintained at the full strength by a regular and constant influx of recruits, who, by association with their veteran comrades, would soon View from Union mortar battery no. 4, looking toward Yorktown.--Gloucester point on the right. From a sketch made April 16, 1862. have become efficient. The new regiments required much time to become useful, and endured very heavy and unnecessary losses from disease and in battle owing to the inexperience of the officers and men. A course more in accordance with the best-established military principles and the uniform experience of war would have saved the country millions of treasure and thousands of valuable lives. Then, on the 5th of April, I found myself wi
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
ss the Potomac — to insure supplies and prompt reenforcements. The pontoon-bridge, thrown as a preliminary, could not be absolutely trusted on a river so liable to heavy freshets; therefore it was determined to construct a canal-boat bridge. It was discovered, however, when the attempt was made, that the lift-lock from the canal to the river was too narrow for the boats by some four or five inches, and I therefore decided to rebuild the railroad bridge, and content myself with occupying Charlestown until its completion, postponing to the same time the advance to Winchester. I had fully explained my intentions to the President and Secretary before leaving Washington, providing for precisely such a contingency. While at Harper's Ferry I learned that the President was dissatisfied with my action, and on reaching Washington I laid a full explanation before the Secretary, with which he expressed himself entirely satisfied, and told me that the President was already so, and that it was
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
rear of the trains reached Malvern, about 4 P. M., the enemy attacked Porter's Corps, but were promptly shaken off. thus, on the morning of July 1st, the Army was concentrated at Malvern, with the trains at Haxall's, in rear. The supplies which had been sent from White House on the 18th were at hand in the James. after consultation with Commodore Rodgers, I decided that Harrison's Landing was a better position for the resting-place of the Army, because the channel passed so close to City point as to enable the enemy to prevent the passage of transports if we remained at Malvern. It was, however, necessary to accept battle where we were, in order to give ample time for the trains to reach Harrison's, as well as to give the enemy a blow that would check his farther pursuit. accordingly, the Army was carefully posted on the admirable position of Malvern Hill, with the right thrown back below Haxall's. The left was the natural point of attack, and there the troops were massed an
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
the refortification of Manassas, the reopening of the Manassas Gap Railroad, the protection of its bridges by block-houses, the intrenchment of a position for a brigade at or near the railroad crossing of the Shenandoah, and an intrenched post at Chester Gap. I left about 42,000 troops for the immediate defense of Washington, and more than 35,000 for the Shenandoah Valley--an abundance to insure the safety of Washington and to check any attempt to recover the lower Shenandoah and threaten Maryland. Beyond this force, the reserves of the Northern States were all available. On my arrival at Fort Monroe on the 2d of April, I found five divisions of infantry, Sykes's brigade of regulars, two regiments of cavalry, and a portion of the reserve artillery disembarked. Another cavalry regiment and a part of a fourth had arrived, but were still on shipboard; comparatively few wagons had come. On the same day came a telegram stating that the Department of Virginia was withdrawn from my co
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.20
erial were consumed in pushing the organization of the Western armies. Meanwhile the various coast expeditions were employed in seizing important points of the enemy's sea-board, to facilitate the prevention of blockade-running, and to cut or threaten the lines of communication near the coast, with reference to subsequent operations. The plan of campaign which I adopted for the spring of 1862 was to push forward the armies of Generals Halleck and Buell to occupy Memphis, Nashville, and Knoxville, and the line of the Memphis and Danville Railroad, so as to deprive the enemy of that important line, and force him to adopt the circuitous routes by Augusta, Branchville, and Charleston. It was also intended to seize Washington, North Carolina, at the earliest practicable moment, and to open the Mississippi by effecting a junction between Generals Halleck and Butler. This movement of the Western armies was to be followed by that of the Army of the Potomac from Urbana, on the lower Rapp
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...