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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

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November, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7.48
l, a distance of not more than two miles. The day was pleasant, says the writer, and the wind did not appear unusually strong. Yet people living in St. Augustine, Florida, told me afterward that the Port Royal cannonade was heard at that place, 150 miles from the fight. The Port Royal incident was related in a communication to The century magazine by Mr. S. H. Prescott, of Concord, N. H., in part as follows: At the bombardment of the Confederate works at Port Royal, South Carolina, in November, 1861, the transport my regiment was on lay near enough inshore to give us a fine view of the whole battle; but only in some temporary lull of the wind could we hear the faintest sound of firing. The day was a pleasant one, and the wind did not appear to be unusually strong; but I noticed then and afterward that a breeze on the coast down that way was very different from the erratic gusts and flaws I had been used to in the New England States, the whole atmosphere seeming to move in a body, g
March 8th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 7.48
The cause of a silent battle. for references to the phenomena of irregular transmission of sound at the battles on the Chickahominy, see the articles of Generals Joseph E. Johnston, Gustavus W. Smith, and Wm. B. Franklin, pp. 213, 244, and 368, respectively. In Vol. I., p. 713, General R. E. Colston, mentions the interesting fact about the engagement between the Congress and Merrimac, at the mouth of the James River, March 8th, 1862. by Professor John B. De Motte, De Pauw University, Ind. Reference has been made to the supposed effect of the wind in preventing, as in the case of the heavy cannonading between the Merrimac and Congress, the transference of sound-waves a distance of not over three and one-half miles over water; and at another time, during the bombardments of the Confederate works at Port Royal, a distance of not more than two miles. The day was pleasant, says the writer, and the wind did not appear unusually strong. Yet people living in St. Augustine, Florida,
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