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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
fact, about that distance from Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry — oft-mentioned names — and from Williamsport, where the armies so often crossed, both to and from Maryland. It was off the direct road between those places and lay, as I said, at the foot of a great sweep in the river, and five miles from the nearest station on the B, as they never had before, blood, wounds, and death. On the 17th of September cloudy skies looked down upon the two armies facing each other on the fields of Maryland. It seems to me now that the roar of that day began with the light, and all through its long and dragging hours its thunder formed a background to our pain and that proved to be correct. The country grew more composed. General Lee lay near Leetown, some seven miles south of us, and General McClellan rested quietly in Maryland. On Sunday we were able to have some short church services for our wounded, cut still shorter, I regret to say, by reports that the Yankees were crossing. Such
Georgetown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
had been destroyed, communication had been made difficult, and Shepherdstown, cornered by the bend of the Potomac, lay as if forgotten in thhe next move in the great game. It was a saying with us that Shepherdstown was just nine miles from every-where. It was, in fact, about t could hear the gun that was fired every evening at s unset. Shepherdstown's only access to the river was through a narrow gorge, the bed field, had attempted to follow the retreat, but, having reached Shepherdstown, could go no farther. We had plenty to do, but all that day wet was really necessary to get that strip of yellow flannel into Shepherdstown as soon as possible. At all events, she made no difficulty, buder and said, with an approving nod: Confederate monument at Shepherdstown. From a photograph taken in 1885. That's right, that's rigual alarms and excursions, but when this Saturday came to an end, the most trying and tempestuous week of the war for Shepherdstown was over.
Leetown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
morning we found the Confederate army in full retreat. General Lee crossed the Potomac under cover of the darkness, and when the day broke the greater part of his force — or the more orderly portion of it — had gone on toward Kearneysville and Leetown. General McClellan followed to the river, and without crossing got a battery in position on Douglas's Hill, and began to shell the retreating army and, in consequence, the town. What before was confusion grew worse; the retreat became a stampe little after, we were told that General McClellan's advance had been checked, and that it was not believed he would attempt to cross the river at once — a surmise that proved to be correct. The country grew more composed. General Lee lay near Leetown, some seven miles south of us, and General McClellan rested quietly in Maryland. On Sunday we were able to have some short church services for our wounded, cut still shorter, I regret to say, by reports that the Yankees were crossing. Such rep<
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
timore and Ohio railroad. As no trains were running now, this was of little consequence ; what was more important was that a turnpike road — unusually fine for that region of stiff, red clay — led in almost a straight line for thirty miles to Winchester on the south, and stretched northward, beyond the Potomac, twenty miles to Hagerstown. Two years later it was the scene of Sheridan's ride. Before the days of steam this had been part of the old posting-road between the Valley towns and Pennsylvania, and we had boasted a very substantial bridge. This had been burned early in the war, and only the massive stone piers remained; but a mile and a half down the Potomac was the ford, and the road that led to it lay partly above and partly along the face of rocky and precipitous cliffs. It was narrow and stony, and especially in one place, around the foot of Mount Misery, was very steep and difficult for vehicles. It was, moreover, entirely commanded by the hills on the Maryland side, bu
South Mountain, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
our windows both points could be observed, and we could not tell which to watch more keenly. We knew almost nothing except that there was fighting, that it must be very heavy, and that our friends were surely in it somewhere, but whether at South Mountain or Harper's Ferry we had no means of discovering. I remember 1. Shephedstown, from the Maryland side. 2. below Shephierdstown — the Potomac to the Ford by which Lee retreated (shown where the River Narrows): from War-time photographs. ha plate of hot soup. What luxury! I sat down then and there on the front doorstep and devoured the soup as if I had been without food for a week. It was known on Tuesday that Harper's Ferry had been taken, but it was growing evident that South Mountain had not been a victory. We had heard from some of our friends, but not from all, and what we did hear was often most unsatisfactory and tantalizing. For instance, we would be told that some one whom we loved had been seen standing with his
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
just nine miles from every-where. It was, in fact, about that distance from Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry — oft-mentioned names — and from Williamsport, where the armies so often crossed, both to anlopes looked down upon the battle-field of Antietam. On clear days we could see the fort at Harper's Ferry without a glass, and the flag flying over it, a mere speck against the sky, and we could hea been informed that General Jackson recrossed into Virginia at Williamsport, and hastened to Harper's Ferry by the shortest roads. These would take him some four miles south of us, and our haggard apakened by heavy firing at two points on the mountains. We were expecting the bombardment of Harper's Ferry, and knew that Jackson was before it. Many of our friends were with him, and our interest thry heavy, and that our friends were surely in it somewhere, but whether at South Mountain or Harper's Ferry we had no means of discovering. I remember 1. Shephedstown, from the Maryland side. 2.
Kearneysville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
ctory, an antiquated, crazy, dismal building of blue stucco that peeled off in great blotches, which had been shut up for years, and was in the last stages of dilapidation. On Thursday night we heard more than usual sounds of disturbance and movement, and in the morning we found the Confederate army in full retreat. General Lee crossed the Potomac under cover of the darkness, and when the day broke the greater part of his force — or the more orderly portion of it — had gone on toward Kearneysville and Leetown. General McClellan followed to the river, and without crossing got a battery in position on Douglas's Hill, and began to shell the retreating army and, in consequence, the town. What before was confusion grew worse; the retreat became a stampede. The battery may not have done a very great deal of execution, but it made a fearful noise. It is curious how much louder guns sound when they are pointed at you than when turned the other way! And the shell, with its long-drawn
Douglas's Hill (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
the darkness, and when the day broke the greater part of his force — or the more orderly portion of it — had gone on toward Kearneysville and Leetown. General McClellan followed to the river, and without crossing got a battery in position on Douglas's Hill, and began to shell the retreating army and, in consequence, the town. What before was confusion grew worse; the retreat became a stampede. The battery may not have done a very great deal of execution, but it made a fearful noise. It is cu the suicide, of the attempt; in vain we argued, cajoled, threatened, ridiculed; pointed out that we were remaining and that there was less danger here than on the road. There is no sense or reason in a panic. The cannon were bellowing upon Douglas's Hill, the shells whistling and shrieking, the air full of shouts and cries; we had to scream to make ourselves heard. The men replied that the Yankees were crossing; that the town was to be burned; that we could not be made prisoners, but they co
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
d. It was off the direct road between those places and lay, as I said, at the foot of a great sweep in the river, and five miles from the nearest station on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. As no trains were running now, this was of little consequence ; what was more important was that a turnpike road — unusually fine for that region of stiff, red clay — led in almost a straight line for thirty miles to Winchester on the south, and stretched northward, beyond the Potomac, twenty miles to Hagerstown. Two years later it was the scene of Sheridan's ride. Before the days of steam this had been part of the old posting-road between the Valley towns and Pennsylvania, and we had boasted a very substantial bridge. This had been burned early in the war, and only the massive stone piers remained; but a mile and a half down the Potomac was the ford, and the road that led to it lay partly above and partly along the face of rocky and precipitous cliffs. It was narrow and stony, and especially
Town Hall (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.79
found together. Those able to travel were sent on to Winchester and other towns back from the river, but their departure seemed to make no appreciable difference. There were six churches, and they were all full; the Odd Fellows' Hall, the Freemasons', the little Town Council room, the barn-like place known as the Drill Room, all the private houses after their capacity, the shops and empty buildings, the school-houses,--every inch of space, and yet the cry was for room. The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness for many a long day. Somebody threw a few rough boards across the beams, placed piles of straw over them, laid down single planks to walk upon, and lo, it was a hospital at once. The stone warehouses down in the ravine and by the river had been passed by, because low and damp and undesirable as sanitariums, but now their doors and windows were thrown wide, and, with barely time allowed to sweep them, they were all occupied,--even the old blue factory, an antiqu
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