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William B. Gaw (search for this): chapter 8.85
nsisted of the open batteries Robinett, Williams, Phillips, Tannrath, and Lothrop, established by Captain Prime on the College Hill line. I immediately ordered them to be connected by breastworks, and the front to the west and north to be covered by such an abatis as the remaining timber on the ground could furnish. I employed colored engineer troops organized into squads of twenty-five each, headed by a man detailed from the line or the quartermaster's department, and commanded by Captain William B. Gaw, a competent engineer. I also ordered an extension of the line of redoubts to cover the north front of the town, one of which, Battery Powell, was nearly completed before the stirring events of the attack. No rifle-pits were constructed between Powell and the central part covering the northwest f ront of the town, which was perfectly open north-east and south-east, with nothing but the distant, old Confederate works between it and the country. To add to these embarrassments in p
Temple Clark (search for this): chapter 8.85
rom Bolivar. Even at this distant time memory lingers on the numerous incidents of distinguished bravery displayed by officers and men who fought splendidly on the first day, when we did not know what the enemy was going to do. Staff as well as line officers distinguished themselves while in action. The first day my presence was required on the main line, and the fighting in front of that did not so much come under my eye, but on the second day I was everywhere on the line of battle. Temple Clark of my staff was shot through the breast. My sabretasche strap was cut by a bullet, and my gloves were stained with the blood of a staff-officer wounded at my side. An alarm spread that I was killed, but it was soon stopped by my appearance on the field. Satisfied that the enemy was retreating, I ordered Sullivan's command to push him with a heavy skirmish line, and to keep constantly feeling them. I rode along the lines of the commands, told them that, having been moving and fightin
Jeremiah C. Sullivan (search for this): chapter 8.85
ision in motion, but by sunset he only reached a point opposite the enemy's left; and after moving down a short distance Sullivan's brigade, facing to the west, crossed the narrow flats flanking the railway, went over into the thickets, and had a fier. After one round, only the dead and dying were left on the porch. Reaching Hamilton's division I ordered him to send Sullivan's brigade forward. It moved in line of battle in open ground a little to the left of Battery Powell. Before its splendmoment he had exhausted himself to charge with the bayonet [see p. 759]. The third assault was made just as I was seeing Sullivan into the fight. I saw the enemy come upon the ridge while Battery Robinett was belching its fire at them. After the chwas killed, but it was soon stopped by my appearance on the field. Satisfied that the enemy was retreating, I ordered Sullivan's command to push him with a heavy skirmish line, and to keep constantly feeling them. I rode along the lines of the co
Arthur C. Ducat (search for this): chapter 8.85
his position and succor McKean's and Davies's divisions that had been doing heavy fighting. Colonel Ducat, acting chief of staff, was sent to direct General Hamilton to file by fours to the left, ane enemy's left, and by its simple advance drive him in and attack his rear. Hamilton told Colonel Ducat that he wanted a more positive and definite order before he made the attack. Ducat explaineDucat explained the condition of the battle and urged an immediate movement, but was obliged to return to me for an order fitted to the situation. I sent the following: headquarters, Army of the Mississippi, much. It looks as if it would be well to occupy the ridge where your skirmishers were when Colonel Ducat left, by artillery, well supported, but his may be farther to right than would be safe. Useaper. The delay thus caused enabled the enemy to overpass the right of Davies so far that while Ducat was returning he was fired on by the enemy's skirmishers, who had reached open ground over the r
John M. Oliver (search for this): chapter 8.85
trike the Mobile and Ohio road and manoeuvre us out of our position. To be prepared for whatever they might do, I sent Oliver's brigade of McKean's division out to Chewalla, ten miles north-west in Tennessee. On the morning of the 3d the enemy's advance came to Chewalla, and Oliver's brigade fell back fighting. I sent orders to the brigade commander to make Map: battle of Corinth, Oct. 3rd and 4th, 1862.a stiff resistance, and see what effect it would have, still thinking that the attackle line of outer works was carried, several pieces [two] of artillery being taken. Finding that the resistance made by Oliver's little command on the Chewalla road early in the morning was not stiff enough to demonstrate the enemy's object, I had ordered McArthur's brigade from McKean's division to go to Oliver's assistance. It was done with a will. McArthur's Scotch blood rose, and the enemy being in fighting force, he fought him with the stubborn ferocity of an action on the main line of
Louis Hebert (search for this): chapter 8.85
up to Ripley, Mississippi, where, on the 28th of September, he was joined by General Price, with Hebert's and Maury's divisions, numbering 13,863 effective infantry, artillery, and cavalry. This coand fiercely hot. Van Dorn says that the Confederate preparations for the morning were: that Hebert, on the left, should mask part of his own division on the left, placing Cabell's brigade en ├ęcheif possible, to get some of his artillery in position across the road. In this order of battle, Hebert was to attack, swinging his left flank toward Corinth, and advance down the Purdy ridge. On thehe right, was ordered to await the attack on his left, feeling his way with sharp-shooters until Hebert was heavily engaged with the enemy. Maury was to move at the same time quickly to the front dir night. The left of General Van Dorn's attack was to have begun earlier, but the accident of Hebert's sickness prevented. The Confederates, from behind a spur of the Purdy ridge, advanced splendi
W. S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 8.85
can make a triumph of our start. As it was, Grant telegraphed to Halleck at 9 A. M. the next day, October 8th: Rosecrans has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he was so averse to returning that I have directed him to remain still until you can be heard fromraphed to Halleck: Before telegraphing you this morning for reenforcements to follow up our victories I ordered General Rosecrans to return. He showed such reluctance that I consented to allow him to remain until you could be heard from if furtg. In closing his report General Van Dorn said: A hand-to-hand contest was being enacted in the very yard of General Rosecrans's Headquarters and in the streets of the town. The heavy guns were silenced, and all seemed to be about ended when
E. O. C. Ord (search for this): chapter 8.85
alion of cavalry, took the route south of the railroad toward Pocahontas; McKean followed on this route with the rest of his division and Ingersoll's cavalry; Hamilton followed McKean with his entire force. The enemy took the road to Davis's Bridge on the Hatchie, by way of Pocahontas. Fortunately General Hurlbut, finding that he was not going to be attacked at Bolivar, had been looking in our direction with a view of succoring us, and now met the enemy at that point [Hatchie Bridge]. General Ord, arriving there from Jackson, Tennessee, assumed command and drove back Group of Union soldiers at Corinth. From a War-time photograph. the head of the enemy's column. This was a critical time for the Confederate forces; but the reader will note that a retreating force, knowing where it has to go and having to look for nothing except an attack on its rear, always moves with more freedom than a pursuing force. This is especially so where the country is covered with woods and thickets
Frederick J. Hurlbut (search for this): chapter 8.85
avalry for outposts and reconnoitering. On October 2d, while Van Dorn was at Pocahontas, General Hurlbut telegraphed the information, from an intelligent Union man of Grand Junction, that Price, Vhe enemy took the road to Davis's Bridge on the Hatchie, by way of Pocahontas. Fortunately General Hurlbut, finding that he was not going to be attacked at Bolivar, had been looking in our directionFrom Jonesborough, on October 7th, I telegraphed General Grant: Do not, I entreat you, call Hurlbut back; let him send away his wounded. It surely is easier to move the sick and wounded than to nd rolling stock will again render them superior to us. Our force, including what you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Hre always difficult to keep in order. We had Sherman at Memphis with two divisions, and we had Hurlbut at Bolivar with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With
Charles S. Hamilton (search for this): chapter 8.85
divisions of Generals David S. Stanley, Charles S. Hamilton, Thomas A. Davies, and Thomas J. McKeanirst real line of battle, word was sent up to Hamilton to advise us if any Confederate force had gotacting chief of staff, was sent to direct General Hamilton to file by fours to the left, and march df the Mississippi, October 3d, 1862. Brigadier-General Hamilton, Commanding Third Division: Rest you reached open ground over the railway between Hamilton and Corinth. Two orderlies sent on the same e way. Upon the receipt of these explanations Hamilton put his division in motion, but by sunset he ttle and hasten to its roar. See General Charles S. Hamilton's statements, p. 758.--Editors. sion commanders, McKean, Davies, Stanley, and Hamilton, at my Headquarters and arranged the dispositrest of his division and Ingersoll's cavalry; Hamilton followed McKean with his entire force. Thehind us. Our advance is beyond Ruckersville. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie crossing on the Ripley[4 more...]
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