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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
llows: General: Yours 8:30 P. M. received. Our troops occupy Ripley. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the manner of pursuing. We have defeated, routed, and demoralized the army which holds the Lower Mississippi Valley. We have the two railroads leading down toward the Gulf through the most productive parts of the State, into which we can now pursue them with safety. The effect of our return to old position will be to pen them up in the only corn country they have west of Alabama, including the Tuscumbia Valley, and to permit them to recruit their forces, advance and occupy their old ground, reducing us to the occupation of a defensive position, barren and worthless, with a long front, over which they can harass us until bad weather prevents an effectual advance except on the railroads, when time, fortifications, and rolling stock will again render them superior to us. Our force, including what you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
hence to Mobile, Alabama. (3) That the Mississippi Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of Mississippi, although here aoutposts and reconnoitering. On October 2d, while Van Dorn was at Pocahontas, General Hurlbut telegraphed the information, from an intelligent Union man of Grand Junction, that Price, Van Dorn, and Villepigue were at Pocahontas, and the talk was that they would attack Bolivar. Evidence arriving thick and fast showed that the e. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers during the winter of 1862-3. from a War-time photograph. occupy Grand Junction to-morrow, with reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last nig
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
The Confederate evacuation of Corinth occurred on the 30th of May, General Beauregard withdrawing his army to Tupelo, where, June 27th, he was succeeded in the command by General Braxton Bragg. Halleck occupied Corinth on the day of its evacuation, and May 31st instructed General Buell, commanding the Army of the Ohio, to repair the Memphis and Charleston railway in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan. To counteract these plans, General Bragg began, on June 27th, the transfer of a large portion of his army to Chattanooga by rail, via Mobile, and about the middle of August set out on the northward movement which terminated only within sight of the Ohio River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and Price. About the middle of July Gene
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan. To counteract these plans, General Bragg began, on June 27th, the transfer of a large portion of his army to Chattanooga by rail, via Mobile, and about the middle of August set out on the northward movement which terminated only within sight of the Ohio River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and Price. About the middle of July General Halleck was called to Washington to discharge the duties of General-in-chief. He left the District of West Tennessee and the territory held in northern Mississippi under the command of General Grant. In August, by Halleck's orders, General Grant sent E. A. Paine's and Jeff. C. Davis's divisions across the Tennessee to strengthen Buell, who was moving northward
Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
ing the 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th of September, the breastworks were completed joining the lunettes from College Hill on the left. A thin abatis made from the scattering trees, which had been left standing along the west and north fronts, covered the line between Robinett and the Mobile and Ohio; thence to Battery Powell the line was mostly open and without rifle-pits. To meet emergencies, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, which had been watching to the south and south-west from near Jacinto to Rienzi, were closed in toward Corinth within short call. Railway Station and Tishomingo Hotel, Corinth. From a War-time photograph. On the 28th I telegraphed to General Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thence to Kossuth, unless he had other views. Two days later I again telegraphed to General Grant that there were no signs of the enemy at Hatchie Crossing, and that m
Kossuth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
eneral Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thence to Kossuth, unless he had other views. Two days later I again telegraphed to General Grant that there were no signs of the enemy at Hatchie Crossing, and that my reason for proposing to put Stanley at or near Kossuth was that he would cover nearly all the Hatchie Crossing, as far as Pocahontas, except against heavy forces, and that Hamilton would then move at least one brigade, from Rienzi. I asked that a sharp lookout be kept in the direction of Bolivar. October 1st, I telegraphed General Grant th left of Davies's and in rear of the old Halleck line of batteries; and Stanley's division, 3500 strong, mainly in reserve on the extreme left, looking toward the Kossuth road. Thus in front of those wooded western approaches, the Union troops, on the morning of October 3d, waited for what might happen, wholly ignorant of what V
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
ditch five feet deep. Davies was to extend from Brigadier-General Pleasant A. Hackleman, killed at Corinth. From a steel Engraving. Stanley's right north-easterly across the flat to Battery Powell, a similar redan on the ridge east of the Purdy road. Hamilton was to be on Davies's right with a brigade, and the rest in reserve on the common east of the low ridge and out of sight from the west. Colonel J. K. Mizner with his cavalry was to watch and guard our flanks and rear from the ene cover save a slight ridge, on the south-west slope of which, near the crest, the men were lying down. Riding along this line, I observed the Confederate forces emerging from the woods west of the railroad and crossing the open ground toward the Purdy road. Our troops lying on the ground could see the flags of the enemy and the glint of the sunlight on their bayonets. It was about 9 o'clock in the morning. The air was still and fiercely hot. Van Dorn says that the Confederate preparations f
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
ant. In August, by Halleck's orders, General Grant sent E. A. Paine's and Jeff. C. Davis's divisions across the Tennessee to strengthen Buell, who was moving northward through middle Tennessee, to meet Bragg. One of these divisions garrisoned Nashville while the other marched with Buell after Bragg into Kentucky. In the early days of September, after the disaster of the Second Bull Run, the friends of the Union watched with almost breathless anxiety the advance of Lee into Maryland, of Braence it extends eastwardly through Iuka, crosses Bear River and follows the Tuscumbia Valley on the south side of that east and west reach of the Tennessee to Decatur. Thence the road crosses to the north side of this river and unites with the Nashville and Chattanooga road at Stevenson en route for Chattanooga. (2) That the Mobile and Ohio railway, from Columbus on the Mississippi, runs considerably east of south, passes through Jackson, Tennessee, Bethel, Corinth, Tupelo, and Baldwyn, Missis
Bear River, Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
the Mississippi Central and Mobile and Ohio railways. The military features of west Tennessee and northern Mississippi will be readily comprehended by the reader who will examine a map of that region Provost-Marshal's Office, Corinth. From a War-time photograph. and notice: (1) That the Memphis and Charleston railway runs not far from the dividing lines between the States, with a southerly bend from Memphis eastward toward Corinth, whence it extends eastwardly through Iuka, crosses Bear River and follows the Tuscumbia Valley on the south side of that east and west reach of the Tennessee to Decatur. Thence the road crosses to the north side of this river and unites with the Nashville and Chattanooga road at Stevenson en route for Chattanooga. (2) That the Mobile and Ohio railway, from Columbus on the Mississippi, runs considerably east of south, passes through Jackson, Tennessee, Bethel, Corinth, Tupelo, and Baldwyn, Mississippi, and thence to Mobile, Alabama. (3) That the Mis
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
timate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan.ion forces from northern Mississippi and western Tennessee, and to plant their flags on the banks oOhio railways. The military features of west Tennessee and northern Mississippi will be readily c Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of Mississippi,ccomplishment of anything of importance in west Tennessee. To take Memphis would be to destroy an iarrival of the exchanged prisoners of war, west Tennessee would soon be in our possession, and commuation with General Bragg effected through middle Tennessee. I determined to attempt Corinth. I h in fine spirits, and the whole Army of West Tennessee seemed eager to emulate the armies of the Poh more courage than marched the Army of West Tennessee out of Ripley on the morning of September 29ion out to Chewalla, ten miles north-west in Tennessee. On the morning of the 3d the enemy's advan[2 more...]
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