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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
risoned Nashville while the other marched with Buell after Bragg into Kentucky. In the early days of September, after the disaster of the Second Bull Run, the friends of the Union watched with almost breathless anxiety the advance of Lee into Maryland, of Bragg into Kentucky, and the hurrying of the Army of the, Potomac northward from Washington, to get between Lee and the cities of Washington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The suspense lest McClellan should not be in time to head off Lee — l not crossed the Tennessee River, he concluded to withdraw from Iuka toward my [his] old encampment. His withdrawal was after the hot battle of Iuka on September 19th, two days after the battle of Antietam which had caused Lee's withdrawal from Maryland. During the month of August General Price had been conferring with General Van Dorn, commanding all the Confederate troops in Mississippi except Price's, to form a combined movement to expel the Union forces from northern Mississippi and west
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
io River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and Price. About the middle of July General Halleck was called to Washington to discharge the duties of General-in-chief. He left the District of West Tennessee and the territory held in northern Mississippi under the command of Generalion watched with almost breathless anxiety the advance of Lee into Maryland, of Bragg into Kentucky, and the hurrying of the Army of the, Potomac northward from Washington, to get between Lee and the cities of Washington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The suspense lest McClellan should not be in time to head off Lee — lest Buell sWashington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The suspense lest McClellan should not be in time to head off Lee — lest Buell should not arrive in time to prevent Bragg from taking Louisville or assaulting Cincinnati, was fearful. At this time I was stationed at Corinth with the Army of the Mississippi, having succeeded General Pope in that command on the 11th of June. We were in the District of West Tennessee, commanded by General Grant. Under the i
Alabaha River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
he railroads, when time, fortifications, and rolling stock will again render them superior to us. Our force, including what you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pursuing and whip them. We have whipped, and should now push them to the wall and capture all the rolling stock of their railroads. Bragg's army alone, west of the Alabama River, and occupying Mobile, could repair the damage we have it in our power to do them. If, after considering these matters, you still consider the order for my return to Corinth expedient, I will obey it and abandon the chief fruits of a victory, but, I beseech you, bend everything to push them while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
om a photograph taken in 1884.The battle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with ourght of the Ohio River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and of West Tennessee and the territory held in northern Mississippi under the command of General Grant. In Auguan Dorn, commanding all the Confederate troops in Mississippi except Price's, to form a combined movement to expel the Union forces from northern Mississippi and western Tennessee, and to plant their flags on the banks of The military features of west Tennessee and northern Mississippi will be readily comprehended by the reader wn of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of Mississippi, although here and there dotted with clearings, futed, and demoralized the army which holds the Lower Mississippi Valley. We have the two railroads leading dow regiments. With these there was nothing to save Mississippi from our grasp. We were about six days march fro
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
son, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Sprit a sharp lookout be kept in the direction of Bolivar. October 1st, I telegraphed General Grant thtar boats. The line of fortifications around Bolivar is intersected by the Hatchie River, renderinere driven back on the Tennessee and cut off, Bolivar and Jackson would easily fall, and then, uponntas, and the talk was that they would attack Bolivar. Evidence arriving thick and fast showed thae enemy was moving, but whether on Corinth or Bolivar, or whether, passing between, they would striim which might, arise from troops coming from Bolivar. Even at this distant time memory lingers nding that he was not going to be attacked at Bolivar, had been looking in our direction with a vies has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52his with two divisions, and we had Hurlbut at Bolivar with one division and John A. Logan at Jackso
Burnsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
of artillery, and a large quantity of equipments. We pursued his retreating column forty miles with all arms, and with cavalry sixty miles. Our loss was 355 killed, 1841 wounded, 324 captured or missing. In closing his report General Van Dorn said: A hand-to-hand contest was being enacted in the very yard of General Rosecrans's Headquarters and in the streets of the town. The heavy guns were silenced, and all seemed to be about ended when a heavy fire from fresh troops from Iuka, Burnsville, and Rienzi, who had succeeded in reaching Corinth, poured into our thinned ranks. Exhausted from loss of sleep, wearied from hard marching and fighting, companies and regiments without officers, our troops — let no one censure them-gave way. The day was lost. . . . The attempt at Corinth has failed, and in consequence I am condemned and have been superseded in my command. In my zeal for my country I may have ventured too far without adequate means, and I bow to the opinion of the people
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
g the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of MississippiOctober 1st, how gratifying would have been the knowledge of the following facts, taken from Van Dorn's report, dated Holly Springs, October 20th, 1862: Surveying the whole field of operations before me, . . . the conclusion forced itself irresit you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pursuing and whip them. We have whipped, anthem while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush down some twenty or thirty new regiments to h
Danville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
ought they must have the impression that our defensive works at Corinth would be pretty formidable. I doubted if they would venture to bring their force against our command behind defensive works. I therefore said: The enemy may threaten us and strike across our line entirely, get on the road between us,and Jackson and advance upon that place, the capture of which would compel us to get out of our lines; or he may come in by the road from Tupelo so as to interpose his force between us and Danville. But all the time I inclined to the belief that it would not be for his interest to do that. I thought that perhaps he would cross the Memphis and Charleston road and, going over to the Mobile and Ohio road, force us to move out and fight him in the open country. October 2d, I sent out a cavalry detachment to reconnoiter in the direction of Pocahontas. They found the enemy's infantry coming close in, and that night some of our detachment were surprised, and their horses and a few of t
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
d western Tennessee, and to plant their flags on the banks of the Lower Ohio, while Bragg was to do the like on that river in Kentucky. Genera, Bethel, and other places on the Mississippi Central and Mobile and Ohio railways. The military features of west Tennessee and northern Miss the Memphis and Charleston road and, going over to the Mobile and Ohio road, force us to move out and fight him in the open country. Octe Memphis and Charleston road, go north of us, strike the Mobile and Ohio road and manoeuvre us out of our position. To be prepared for whasion, 3204 strong, between the Memphis and Charleston and Mobile and Ohio railways, north-west of the town; McKean's division, 5315 strong, tose us if any Confederate force had gotten through, on the Mobile and Ohio road. At 3 o'clock when the fighting began and became very heavy, Sthat purpose, move Armstrong's cavalry brigade across the Mobile and Ohio road, and, if possible, to get some of his artillery in position acr
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
Mississippi from Paducah to Columbus, and at Jackson, Bethel, and other places on the Mississippi nsiderably east of south, passes through Jackson, Tennessee, Bethel, Corinth, Tupelo, and Baldwyn, M Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar a General Grant moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th ofA. Davies. From a photograph. miles north to Jackson, on the Mobile and Ohio railway, with all thet's,--in line, with reserves in rear of each; Jackson's cavalry was on the right en échelon, the lees in line of battle and one in reserve, with Jackson's cavalry to the right, was ordered to await the pursuit. General McPherson, sent from Jackson with five good regiments to help us, arrived ridge]. General Ord, arriving there from Jackson, Tennessee, assumed command and drove back Groupr with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With these there w
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