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Frederick E. Prime (search for this): chapter 8.85
houses are at the cross-road, the best thing we can do is to run a line of light works around in the neighborhood of the college up on the knoll. So, one day, after dining with General Grant, he proposed that we go up together and take Captain Frederick E. Prime with us, and he gave orders to commence a line of breastworks that would include the college grounds. This was before the battle of Iuka. After Iuka I was ordered to command the district, and General Grant moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th of September I repaired to Corinth, where I found the only defensive works available consisted of the open batteries Robinett, Williams, Phillips, Tannrath, and Lothrop, established by Captain Prime on the College Hill line. I immediately ordered them to be connected by breastworks, and the front to the west and north to be covered by such an abatis as the remaining timber on the ground could furnish. I employed colored engineer troops or
William P. Rogers (search for this): chapter 8.85
chasing them with bayonets. The head of the enemy's main column reached within a few feet of Battery Robinett, and Colonel Rogers, who was leading it, colors in hand, dismounted, planted a flag-staff on the bank of the ditch, and fell there, shot by one of our drummer-boys, who, with a pistol, was helping to defend Robinett. I was told that Colonel Rogers was the fifth standard-bearer who had fallen in that last desperate charge. It was about as good fighting on the part of the Confederatesome. I said, The ground in front of battery Robinett. From a photograph taken after the battle. Grave of Colonel William P. Rogers, looking toward Corinth from the embankment of Fort Robinett. From a photograph taken in 1884. Whose troopthree days and two nights, I knew they required rest, but that they could not rest longer than was absolutely Colonel William P. Rogers, C. S. A., killed in leading Tihe assault upon Fort Robinett. From a photograph. necessary. I directed them t
Pleasant A. Hackleman (search for this): chapter 8.85
in the afternoon was so hot that McKean was ordered to send further help over to the fighting troops, and Stanley to send a brigade through the woods by the shortest cut to help Davies, whose division covered itself with glory, having Brigadier-General Hackleman killed, Brigadier-General Oglesby desperately wounded, with nearly twenty-five per cent of its strength put out of the fight. Watching intently every movement which would throw light on the enemy's intentions, soon after midday I decieft, the chief point being College Hill, keeping his troops well under cover. Stanley was to support the line on either side of Battery Robinett, a little three-gun redan with a ditch five feet deep. Davies was to extend from Brigadier-General Pleasant A. Hackleman, killed at Corinth. From a steel Engraving. Stanley's right north-easterly across the flat to Battery Powell, a similar redan on the ridge east of the Purdy road. Hamilton was to be on Davies's right with a brigade, and the
Richard J. Oglesby (search for this): chapter 8.85
re pushed and called for reinforcements, orders were sent to fall back slowly and stubbornly. The Confederates, elated at securing these old out-works, pushed in toward our main line, in front of which the fighting in the afternoon was so hot that McKean was ordered to send further help over to the fighting troops, and Stanley to send a brigade through the woods by the shortest cut to help Davies, whose division covered itself with glory, having Brigadier-General Hackleman killed, Brigadier-General Oglesby desperately wounded, with nearly twenty-five per cent of its strength put out of the fight. Watching intently every movement which would throw light on the enemy's intentions, soon after midday I decided that it was a main attack of the enemy. Hamilton's division had been sent up the railroad as far as the old Confederate works in the morning, and formed the right of our line. At 1 o'clock his division was still there watching against attack from the north. When the enemy prepa
Lewis A. Grant (search for this): chapter 8.85
northern Mississippi under the command of General Grant. In August, by Halleck's orders, General e District of West Tennessee, commanded by General Grant. Under the idea that I would reinforce Bu to go over from my camp at Clear Creek to General Grant's Corona College, Corinth. From a War-tthe knoll. So, one day, after dining with General Grant, he proposed that we go up together and tapreparing the place to resist a sudden attack, Grant, the general commanding, had retired fifty-eigotograph. On the 28th I telegraphed to General Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my on of Bolivar. October 1st, I telegraphed General Grant that we were satisfied there was no enemy onesborough, on October 7th, I telegraphed General Grant: Do not, I entreat you, call Hurlbut b from. Again on the same day, October 8th, Grant telegraphed to Halleck: Before telegraphin were about six days march from Vicksburg, and Grant could have put his force through to it with my[6 more...]
Lorenzo D. Immell (search for this): chapter 8.85
, as they had been directed to do in such an emergency. Two shells were thrown from Battery Williams into Battery Robinett, one bursting on the top of it and the other near the right edge. In the meanwhile the 11th Missouri Volunteers (in reserve) changed front, and, aided by the 43d and 63d Ohio Volunteers with the 27th Ohio Volunteers on their right, gallantly stormed up to the right and left of the battery, driving the enemy before them.--Editors. Confederates. I ordered Lieutenant Lorenzo D. Immell, with two field-pieces, to give them grape and canister. After one round, only the dead and dying were left on the porch. Reaching Hamilton's division I ordered him to send Sullivan's brigade forward. It moved in line of battle in open ground a little to the left of Battery Powell. Before its splendid advance the scattered enemy, who were endeavoring to form a line of battle, about 1 P. M. gave way and went back into the woods, from which they never again advanced. Meanwhil
Albert M. Powell (search for this): chapter 8.85
tis as the remaining timber on the ground could furnish. I employed colored engineer troops organized into squads of twenty-five each, headed by a man detailed from the line or the quartermaster's department, and commanded by Captain William B. Gaw, a competent engineer. I also ordered an extension of the line of redoubts to cover the north front of the town, one of which, Battery Powell, was nearly completed before the stirring events of the attack. No rifle-pits were constructed between Powell and the central part covering the northwest f ront of the town, which was perfectly open north-east and south-east, with nothing but the distant, old Confederate works between it and the country. To add to these embarrassments in preparing the place to resist a sudden attack, Grant, the general commanding, had retired fifty-eight Brevet Major-General Thomas A. Davies. From a photograph. miles north to Jackson, on the Mobile and Ohio railway, with all the knowledge of the country acquir
Thomas D. Maurice (search for this): chapter 8.85
battery Robinett. From a War-time sketch. Captain George A. Williams, 1st U. S. Infantry, who commanded the siege artillery, says in his report: About 9:30 or 10 A. M. the enemy were observed in the woods north of the town forming in line, and they soon made their appearance, charging toward the town. As soon as our troops were out of the line of fire of my battery, we opened upon them with two 30-pounder Parrott guns and one 8-inch howitzer, which enfiladed their line (aided by Maurice's battery and one gun on the right of Battery Robinett, which bore on that part of the town), and continued our fire until the enemy were repulsed and had regained the wood. During the time the enemy were being repulsed from the town my attention was drawn to the left side of the battery by the firing from Battery Robinett, where I saw a column advancing to storm it. After advancing a short distance they were repulsed, but immediately re-formed, and, storming the work, gained the ditch,
ennessee. The Confederate evacuation of Corinth occurred on the 30th of May, General Beauregard withdrawing his army to Tupelo, where, June 27th, he was succeeded in the command by General Braxton Bragg. Halleck occupied Corinth on the day of its evacuation, and May 31st instructed General Buell, commanding the Army of the Ohio, to repair the Memphis and Charleston railway in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan. To counteract these plans, General Bragg began, on June 27th, the transfer of a large portion of his army to Chattanooga by rail, via Mobile, and about the middle of August set out on the northward movement which terminated only within sight of the Ohio River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and Price. About the middle
Roswell S. Ripley (search for this): chapter 8.85
the chief fruits of a victory, but, I beseech you, bend everything to push them while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush down some twenty or thirty new regiments to hold our rear, and we can make a triumph of our start. As it was, Grant telegraphed to Halleck at 9 A. M. the next day, October 8th: Rosecrans has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers during the winter of 1862-3. from a War-time photograph. occupy Grand Junction to-morrow, with reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he was so averse to returning that I have directed him to remain still until you can be heard from. Again on the same day, October 8th, Grant telegraphed
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