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E. D. Townsend (search for this): chapter 2.14
h, for further orders. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. This order was inclosed: War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5th, 1862. General orders, No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War: E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. If we except Halleck's report of October 28th, obviously called for and furnished as a record, and containing nothing new, no cause or reason has ever been made public, either officially or in any one of the many informal modes in which official action so often finds it convenient to let itself be known. It is hard to credit that the Government did not know, or that knowing they did not appreciate, the military situation on the 5th of November; still ha
S. S. Stanton (search for this): chapter 2.14
side as you have stood by me, and all will be well. T ihe soldiers were calmed. They rolled the car onward, recoupled it to the train, and with one long and mournful huzza bade farewell to their late commander, whom many of them were destined never to behold again. General McClellan reached Washington on the following day, and without tarrying for an hour proceeded at once to Trenton, where he arrived at 4 o'clock in the morning of the 12th. From that time he never again saw Lincoln, or Stanton, or Halleck.--editors. In all that these brave men did, in all that they suffered, and great were their deeds, unspeakable their sufferings, never, perhaps, were their devotion and loyalty more nobly proved than by their instant obedience to this order, unwisely wrung from the President as many of them believed it to have been, yet still for them, as American soldiers, as American citizens, an implicit mandate. The men who could talk so glibly of praetoriann guards knew little of the A
Carswell McClellan (search for this): chapter 2.14
d the first crisis. On the 1st of September McClellan found himself a general without an army. Onck an order, which never became known to General McClellan, to organize an army for active operatio private letter dated October 2d, printed in McClellan's own story (p. 654). His [the Presidents] ofound tersely expressed in his letter to General McClellan, dated October 13th, 1862, printed on p. The Official Records show that at this time McClellan's effective force was about 145,000, Lee's ag order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the formthese two officers proceeded together to General McClellan's tent. McClellan says: McClellan's McClellan says: McClellan's own story, pp. 652, 653. I at once [when he heard of Buckingham's arrival] suspected that he de's request; but there the execution of General McClellan's plans stopped. Burnside turned to ther of Fredericksburg followed. On the 10th McClellan bade farewell to the Army of the Potomac. A[21 more...]
Ambrose E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 2.14
immediately turn over your command to Major-General Burnside, and repair to Trenton, N. J., reportid of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By oin a blinding snow-storm. First calling upon Burnside to deliver to him a counterpart of the order,ible. After a few moments Buckingham said to Burnside: Well, General, I think we had better tell Ghe papers with a smile, immediately turned to Burnside, and said: Well, Burnside, I turn the commandBurnside, I turn the command over to you. General Buckingham, in a letter printed in the Chicago Tribune, of September 4th, 1 to the same effect. He also states that General Burnside at first declined the command (as there igun were completed on the 8th and 9th, at General Burnside's request; but there the execution of General McClellan's plans stopped. Burnside turned to the left and massed his army on the Rappahannockion of the troops and in conferences with General Burnside respecting future operations. In the cou[5 more...]
D. Appleton (search for this): chapter 2.14
t had learned to look on war without a tremor. In the simple, touching words of the gallant and accomplished Walker: Every heart was filled with love and grief; every voice was raised in shouts expressive of devotion and indignation; and when the chief had passed out of sight, the romance of war was over for the Army of the Potomac. History of the Second army Corps, by General Francis A. Walker, p. 137. From McClellan's last service to the Republic, by George Ticknor Curtis (N. Y.: D. Appleton & Co.), pp. 81-83, we take the following description of McClellan's farewell to the Army of the Potomac: After he had reached Warrenton, a day was spent in viewing the position of the troops and in conferences with General Burnside respecting future operations. In the course of that day the order was published, and General McClellan issued a farewell address to the army. On the evening of Sunday, the 9th, there was an assembly of officers who came to take leave of him. On the 10th
Daniel H. Hill (search for this): chapter 2.14
ouble that of the Army of Northern Virginia, The Official Records show that at this time McClellan's effective force was about 145,000, Lee's about 72,000. Longstreet and Jackson each had about 32,000.--R. B. I. between the two halves of that army, farther separated by the Blue Ridge; for Lee, with Longstreet's corps, had kept pace with McClellan's movement and advanced to Culpeper, and Jackson was still in the Valley of Virginia, distant several days' march behind Thornton's Gap, with D. H. Hill holding the western entrance to the gap against Pleasonton, who was on the east, observing its debouch. On that very day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, with his own hand, wrote the following order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the form as written by the President, was never promulgated. General Hunter was not placed in command of Burnside's corps. Hooker was ordered to relieve Porter by Special Orders from the War De
John G. Hazard (search for this): chapter 2.14
were calmed. They rolled the car onward, recoupled it to the train, and with one long and mournful huzza bade farewell to their late commander, whom many of them were destined never to behold again. General McClellan reached Washington on the following day, and without tarrying for an hour proceeded at once to Trenton, where he arrived at 4 o'clock in the morning of the 12th. From that time he never again saw Lincoln, or Stanton, or Halleck.--editors. In all that these brave men did, in all that they suffered, and great were their deeds, unspeakable their sufferings, never, perhaps, were their devotion and loyalty more nobly proved than by their instant obedience to this order, unwisely wrung from the President as many of them believed it to have been, yet still for them, as American soldiers, as American citizens, an implicit mandate. The men who could talk so glibly of praetoriann guards knew little of the Army of the Potomac. Hot work for Hazard's Battery. See P. 115.
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 2.14
f the Army of Northern Virginia, The Official Records show that at this time McClellan's effective force was about 145,000, Lee's about 72,000. Longstreet and Jackson each had about 32,000.--R. B. I. between the two halves of that army, farther separated by the Blue Ridge; for Lee, with Longstreet's corps, had kept pace with McClellan's movement and advanced to Culpeper, and Jackson was still in the Valley of Virginia, distant several days' march behind Thornton's Gap, with D. H. Hill holding the western entrance to the gap against Pleasonton, who was on the east, observing its debouch. On that very day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, wcClellan's plans stopped. Burnside turned to the left and massed his army on the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg; Lee conformed to this movement, called in Jackson, and concentrated on the opposite heights. The disaster of Fredericksburg followed. On the 10th McClellan bade farewell to the Army of the Potomac. As he rod
Fitz John Porter (search for this): chapter 2.14
ng order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the form as written by the President, was never promulgated. General Hunter was not placed in command of Burnside's corps. Hooker was ordered to relieve Porter by Special Orders from the War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, dated November 10th, 1862. Executive Mansion, Washington, 1862 By direction of the President it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take command of that army. Also that Major-General Hunter take command of the corps in said army now commanded by General Burnside. That Major-General Fitz John Porter be relieved from the command of the corps he now commands in said army, and that Major-General Hooker take command of said corps. The general-in-chief is authorized, in [his] discretion, to issue an order substantially as the above, forthwith or as soon as he may dee
Edward C. Washington (search for this): chapter 2.14
al modes in which official action so often finds it convenient to let itself be known. It is hard to credit that the Government did not know, or that knowing they did not appreciate, the military situation on the 5th of November; still harder to believe that, knowing and appreciating it, they threw away such an opportunity for any cause that appears in Halleck's letter. General C. P. Buckingham, the confidential assistant adjutant-general of the Secretary of War, bore these orders from Washington by a special train. He arrived at Rectortown in a blinding snow-storm. First calling upon Burnside to deliver to him a counterpart of the order, late on the night of November 7th these two officers proceeded together to General McClellan's tent. McClellan says: McClellan's own story, pp. 652, 653. I at once [when he heard of Buckingham's arrival] suspected that he brought the order relieving me from command, but kept my own counsel. Late at night I was sitting alone in my tent
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