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C. P. Buckingham (search for this): chapter 2.14
rtunity for any cause that appears in Halleck's letter. General C. P. Buckingham, the confidential assistant adjutant-general of the Secretllan's own story, pp. 652, 653. I at once [when he heard of Buckingham's arrival] suspected that he brought the order relieving me from pole, and upon my invitation to enter there appeared Burnside and Buckingham, both looking very solemn. I received them kindly and commenced cts in the most unconcerned manner possible. After a few moments Buckingham said to Burnside: Well, General, I think we had better tell Genevery pleasantly said that I should be glad to learn it. Whereupon Buckingham handed me the two orders of which he was the bearer . . . . I saw that both-especially Buckingham — were watching me most intently while I opened and read the orders. I read the papers with a smile, imme and said: Well, Burnside, I turn the command over to you. General Buckingham, in a letter printed in the Chicago Tribune, of September 4th
Morton C. Hunter (search for this): chapter 2.14
y day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, with his own hand, wrote the following order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the form as written by the President, was never promulgated. General Hunter was not placed in command of Burnside's corps. Hooker was ordered to relieve Porter by Special Orders from the War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, dated November 10th, 1862. Executive Mansion, Washington, 1862 By direction of the President it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take command of that army. Also that Major-General Hunter take command of the corps in said army now commanded by General Burnside. That Major-General Fitz John Porter be relieved from the command of the corps he now commands in said army, and that Major-General Hooker take command of said corps. The general-in-chief is authorized, in [his] dis
Alfred Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 2.14
mstances had somewhat changed. Among other things, Stuart crossed the Potomac at Williamsport on the 10th of October, on his famous raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania, rode completely around the rear of the Army of the Potomac, and, eluding Pleasonton's vigorous but ineffectual pursuit, safely recrossed the river near the mouth of the Monocacy. One effect of this raid on the mind of the President is indicated in an anecdote related in Washington under Banks, Vol. II. of this work, p. 544.-treet's corps, had kept pace with McClellan's movement and advanced to Culpeper, and Jackson was still in the Valley of Virginia, distant several days' march behind Thornton's Gap, with D. H. Hill holding the western entrance to the gap against Pleasonton, who was on the east, observing its debouch. On that very day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, with his own hand, wrote the following order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the
November 5th (search for this): chapter 2.14
arper's Ferry, he marched down the eastern side of the Blue Ridge, as the President had originally desired, picked up the Third and Eleventh Corps and Bayard's division of cavalry on striking the railway opposite Thoroughfare Gap, and on the 5th of November made his headquarters at Rectortown, with all his arrangements in progress for concentrating the army near Warrenton. This movement in effect placed the Army of the Potomac, with a force double that of the Army of Northern Virginia, Thn any one of the many informal modes in which official action so often finds it convenient to let itself be known. It is hard to credit that the Government did not know, or that knowing they did not appreciate, the military situation on the 5th of November; still harder to believe that, knowing and appreciating it, they threw away such an opportunity for any cause that appears in Halleck's letter. General C. P. Buckingham, the confidential assistant adjutant-general of the Secretary of War,
November 7th (search for this): chapter 2.14
te, the military situation on the 5th of November; still harder to believe that, knowing and appreciating it, they threw away such an opportunity for any cause that appears in Halleck's letter. General C. P. Buckingham, the confidential assistant adjutant-general of the Secretary of War, bore these orders from Washington by a special train. He arrived at Rectortown in a blinding snow-storm. First calling upon Burnside to deliver to him a counterpart of the order, late on the night of November 7th these two officers proceeded together to General McClellan's tent. McClellan says: McClellan's own story, pp. 652, 653. I at once [when he heard of Buckingham's arrival] suspected that he brought the order relieving me from command, but kept my own counsel. Late at night I was sitting alone in my tent, writing to my wife. All the staff were asleep. Suddenly some one knocked upon the tent-pole, and upon my invitation to enter there appeared Burnside and Buckingham, both lookin
September 4th, 1875 AD (search for this): chapter 2.14
ell General McClellan the object of our visit. I very pleasantly said that I should be glad to learn it. Whereupon Buckingham handed me the two orders of which he was the bearer . . . . I saw that both-especially Buckingham — were watching me most intently while I opened and read the orders. I read the papers with a smile, immediately turned to Burnside, and said: Well, Burnside, I turn the command over to you. General Buckingham, in a letter printed in the Chicago Tribune, of September 4th, 1875 (quoted in the History of the civil War in America, by the Comte de Paris, Vol. II., p. 555), writes substantially to the same effect. He also states that General Burnside at first declined the command (as there is good reason for believing he had done twice before, namely, in August, and again early in September). He adds: General McClellan has himself borne testimony to the kind manner in which I communicated the order, and I can bear testimony to his prompt and cheerful obedience
October 13th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 2.14
ated October 2d, printed in McClellan's own story (p. 654). His [the Presidents] ostensible purpose is to see the troops and the battle-field; I incline to think that the real purpose of his visit is to push on into a premature advance into Virginia. . . . The real truth is that my army is not fit to advance. President Lincoln's views as to the comparative readiness to move of the Federal and Confederate armies may be found tersely expressed in his letter to General McClellan, dated October 13th, 1862, printed on p. 105. However, on the 6th, two days after Mr. Lincoln's departure, General Halleck telegraphed to General McClellan: The President directs that you cross the Potomac and give battle to the enemy or drive him south. Your army must move now, while the roads are good. If you cross the river between the enemy and Washington and cover the latter by your operation, you can be reenforced with 30,000 men. If you move up the valley of the Shenandoah, not more than 12,000 or
November 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 2.14
tern entrance to the gap against Pleasonton, who was on the east, observing its debouch. On that very day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, with his own hand, wrote the following order: It is virtually certain that General McClella discretion, to issue an order substantially as the above, forthwith or as soon as he may deem proper. A. Lincoln. November 5th, 1862. Forthwith the following orders were issued: Headquarters of the army, Washington, November 5th, 1862. November 5th, 1862. Major-General McClellan, Commanding, etc.--General: On receipt of the order of the President, sent herewith, you will immediately turn over your command to Major-General Burnside, and repair to Trenton, N. J., reporting, on your arrival at that placalleck, General-in-Chief. This order was inclosed: War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5th, 1862. General orders, No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General M
October, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 2.14
eks after Antietam, or the scattered leaves that are some time to be gathered into history, it is impossible not to realize that we are reading of the last days of the first and best-loved commander of the Army of the Potomac; that the last hour is not far off. Without going into the details, and without attempting to pass judgment, it must be said that no candid person, knowing anything of war and armies, can doubt that the Army of the Potomac, in the last days of September and early October, 1862, needed nearly everything before beginning a fresh campaign of its own choice. For some things, such as shoes, the troops were really suffering. It is equally evident that the duty of providing these essential supplies rested with the administrative services in Washington; that some of the supplies did not reach the troops for a long time, In particular the statement of General Rufus Ingalls ( Official Records, Vol. XIX., Part I., p. 95) seems to me conclusive, although the contrar
September 1st (search for this): chapter 2.14
. S. V. In some former notes The Administration in the Peninsular campaign, Vol. II. of this work, p. 435; Washington under Banks, Vol. II. of this work, p. 541. I tried to trace with an impartial hand, and without intruding any prejudice or opinion of my own, the course of the unfortunate differences that had arisen between the Government and the commander of the Army of the Potomac. The acute stage was reached on the Peninsula; Pope's campaign marked the first crisis. On the 1st of September McClellan found himself a general without an army. On the 2d the Government gave him what was left of two armies, and only asked him to defend the capital. On the 5th the troops were in motion; on the 7th, without another word, and thus, as appears probable, overstepping the intentions of the Government, See Vol. II., p. 542, and note. This is strongly confirmed by Chase's diary, September 2 (Warden's Life of Chase, p. 549): The President repeated that the whole scope of the orde
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