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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
ut to flight almost the entire corps of Howard; and it was with the utmost difficulty that I could lead up my reserves to the interior line of Williams, and bring Jackson's victorious forces to a halt. This failure of Howard to hold his ground cost us our position, and I was forced, in the presence of the enemy, to take up a new oow. The following are extracts from the official report of General Schurz, who shows, besides, that his division made strenuous efforts to stem the assaults of Jackson's men: In the course of the forenoon I was informed that large columns of the enemy could be seen from General Devens's headquarters, moving from east to wedo as much as I could, but no more. Had Sedgwick come up on Lee's rear, the latter would have found himself between two armies, and would doubtless have followed Jackson's flank movement, which I desired, as that would throw the enemy off the short r oad to Richmond and our troops on it. I do not know that you ever heard that I ha
Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
withdraw the remainder, and, marching nearly thirty miles up the stream, to cross the Rappahannock and the Rapidan unopposed, and in four days time to arrive at Chancellorsville, within five miles of this coveted ground, The demonstrations began on April 21st, and were made at intervals at Kelly's Ford, Rappahannock Bridge, and Port Royal. The movement of Sedgwick below the town was disclosed to Lee on the 29th, when the pontoons were laid and the crossing took place at the point where Franklin's Left Grand Division crossed in December, 1862. Hooker's flanking column, consisting of the Fifth, Eleventh, and Twelfth corps and two divisions of the Second Corps, crossed the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford on the 28th and 29th by pontoon-bridges, and passed the Rapidan by fording and by means of pontoons, arriving at Chancellorsville on the 30th. The Third Corps, after taking part in the demonstrations before Fredericksburg, crossed the Rappahannock at United States Ford and reached Cha
Salem Heights (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
k, who commanded the Sixth Corps, the largest in my army, some 22,000 men, Retreat of the Union army across the Rappahannock at United States Ford. From a War-time sketch. which had been left to demonstrate in front of Fredericksburg, to cross the river and move rapidly up to my left. The effect of so heavy a body of fresh troops coming in upon the enemy's flank I calculated would be decisive. But Sedgwick was dilatory in moving, See statements in Sedgwick at Fredericksburg and Salem Heights, p. 224.--editors. which gave the enemy time to concentrate and stop him before he had moved over half the distance, and I consequently got no help from him. I ventured to ask why he did not attack when he found that the enemy had weakened his forces in the immediate front and sent them away to meet Sedgwick. That, said he, would seem to have been the reasonable thing to do. But we were in this impenetrable thicket. All the roads and openings leading through it the enemy immediately
Lookout Valley (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
itors. Could I have had my army on the open grounds at that point where I could have manoeuvred it properly, I felt assured that I could have gained a decisive victory. But this, my last chance, was frustrated. The subjoined letter has been kindly furnished to us for publication by Lieutenant Worth G. Ross, son of the late Colonel Samuel Ross, to whom it is addressed. It is believed that it had not been printed before its appearance in The century for April, 1888.--editors. Lookout Valley, Tenn., February 28th, 1864. my dear Colonel: For some reason your letter was a long time in reaching me. When the Eleventh Corps gave way on Saturday, Berry's division and Hays's brigade were dispatched to seize and hold the ground occupied by the left of that corps. Berry double-quicked his men to the point, but was too late. The enemy were already in possession. When this was reported to me I directed my engineers to establish a new line, which was pointed out to them on the map, a
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
exposed. I knew that I could do this, and I gave the enemy credit for being able to do as much as I could, but no more. Had Sedgwick come up on Lee's rear, the latter would have found himself between two armies, and would doubtless have followed Jackson's flank movement, which I desired, as that would throw the enemy off the short r oad to Richmond and our troops on it. I do not know that you ever heard that I had one and a half millions of rations afloat in the Potomac to throw up the Pamunkey River in view of this contingency. I recrossed the Rappahannock, expecting to return at or near Franklin's Crossing, where I had elbow-room [see p. 74], and at least an even chance for being victorious, and so stated to the President at the time. No general battle was fought at Chancellorsville, for I was unwilling to give battle with such great odds against me. I rejoice that what was not gained was not lost. We lost no honors at Chancellorsville. With all of our misfortunes the enemy
Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
y miles up the stream, to cross the Rappahannock and the Rapidan unopposed, and in four days time to arrive at Chancellorsville, within five miles of this coveted ground, The demonstrations began on April 21st, and were made at intervals at Kelly's Ford, Rappahannock Bridge, and Port Royal. The movement of Sedgwick below the town was disclosed to Lee on the 29th, when the pontoons were laid and the crossing took place at the point where Franklin's Left Grand Division crossed in December, 1862. Hooker's flanking column, consisting of the Fifth, Eleventh, and Twelfth corps and two divisions of the Second Corps, crossed the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford on the 28th and 29th by pontoon-bridges, and passed the Rapidan by fording and by means of pontoons, arriving at Chancellorsville on the 30th. The Third Corps, after taking part in the demonstrations before Fredericksburg, crossed the Rappahannock at United States Ford and reached Chancellorsville on May 1st, and was followed by the F
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
r position, and I was forced, in the presence of the enemy, to take up a new one. Upon investigation I found that Howard had failed properly to obey my instructions to prepare to meet the enemy from the west. In this connection the following extracts from a letter to Hooker from Schurz (who subsequently gave General Hooker leave to print it) will be read with interest: 40 W. 32D St., New York, April 22d, 1876. my dear General: Your letter of the 8th inst. was forwarded to me from St. Louis, and reached me here early this morning, and I hasten to reply. I regret very much that, my papers being boxed up, I have no access to a memorandum of the circumstances connected with the battle of Chancellorsville, as they came under my observation, which memorandum I put on paper shortly after that event. So I have to depend upon my memory in answering your questions. According to my recollection, you are mistaken in your impression that General Howard put your dispatches and orders i
Plank (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
change of front. The matter was largely discussed at your headquarters, and I entertained and expressed in our informal conversations the opinion that we should form upon the open ground we then occupied, with our front at right angles with the Plank road, lining the church grove and the border of the woods east of the open plain with infantry, placing strong ├ęchelons behind both wings, and distributing the artillery along the front on ground most favorable for its action, especially on the eChancellorsville House, and, besides, enfilade the line held by the Second and Twelfth corps nearly its entire length. Soon after these instructions were given to the engineers, peremptory orders were sent to General Sedgwick to advance over the Plank road from Fredericksburg and attack the enemy in front of the Second and Twelfth corps at daylight. My single object in holding on to the position as long as I did was to hear Sedgwick's guns, which I momentarily expected, of course. General Wa
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
ch he said that he had visited their city but once before, and although his reception now was not nearly so warm as on that former day, yet it was far more agreeable to him,--a conceit which greatly pleased his hearers. Our drive over the Fredericksburg field, which we visited on the way, was on one of the most perfect of autumnal days, and at every turn fresh reminiscences of that battle were suggested. As we approached the flag-staff of the National Cemetery, on the hill adjoining Marye's Heights, where more than fifteen thousand of the Union dead of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania are buried, General Hooker said: I never think of this ground but with a shudder. The whole scene is indelibly fixed in my mind, as it appeared on that fatal day. Here on this ground were ranged the enemy's cannon, and the heights farther to his left were thickly planted with pieces; all the infantry he could use was disposed behind earth-works and stone walls
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.30
r to the battle-fields of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Antietam,--fields on which he had boing and by means of pontoons, arriving at Chancellorsville on the 30th. The Third Corps, after takihannock at United States Ford and reached Chancellorsville on May 1st, and was followed by the Firstss) which covers the whole country around Chancellorsville, and in three hours time I would have beet, or Wilderness, which covers the entire Chancellorsville battle-ground,--a dense forest, says Geneame near ruining my army. My position at Chancellorsville was a good one for this monotonous countr headquarters, army of the Potomac, Chancellorsville, Va., May 2d, 1863, 9:30 A. M. Circular.Majral Howard's headquarters, a house on the Chancellorsville road near the center of our position. Gehancellor House (which is all there is of Chancellorsville), where General Hooker had his headquartehe time. No general battle was fought at Chancellorsville, for I was unwilling to give battle with [7 more...]
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