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Poplar Island (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
early part of March, 1863, it was arranged that a considerable force (8000 or 10,000) of all arms should rendezvous at Baton Rouge, preparatory to moving to the rear of the Port Hudson works, a little time before the vessels should move from Poplar Island, which lay just out of range of the Port Hudson heavy guns. After a review of the military forces at Baton Rouge, and after Admiral Farragut had attended to the minutest details of inspection of the vessels,--the removal of the sick, the necessary changes of officers and men, and last, but most difficult at that time, the employment of a sufficient number of competent river pilots,--the vessels got under way in their usual order of steaming, led by the Hartford, and stood up to Poplar Island, where the Essex and the bomb-vessels were lying. During a brief stay here, the commanders of the vessels were called on board and their instructions were repeated to them. Every contingency, even the most minute, every casualty that could o
Steele's Bayou (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
March, before the Yazoo Pass expedition returned, Porter decided to try another route, through a series of narrow streams and bayous which made a circuitous connection between the Mississippi and the Sunflower, a tributary of the Yazoo River. Steele's Bayou was a sluggish stream which entered the Mississippi a few miles above the mouth of the Yazoo. Black Bayou, which was little better than a narrow ditch, connected Steele's Bayou with Deer Creek, a tortuous river with a difficult and shallow cSteele's Bayou with Deer Creek, a tortuous river with a difficult and shallow channel. A second lateral bayou, called Rolling Fork, connected Deer Creek with the Sunflower. From Rolling Fork the way was easy, but the difficulties of reaching that point were such that no commander with less than Porter's indefatigable energy and audacious readiness to take risks that promised a bare chance of success, would have ventured on the expedition. The flotilla, consisting of the remaining five Eads gun-boats, the Carondelet, Cincinnati, Louisville, Mound City, and Pittsburgh,
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
Confederates retained a strong foothold was at Vicksburg. The objects of the river operations were to establish communication from the Ohio to the Gulf, and to cut off the important supplies drawn by the Confederacy from Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. The commanders of the Mississippi squadron during this period were, first, Charles Henry Davis, and later, David D. Porter, the transfer of the command taking place October 15th, 1862. The operations of the navy at this time were unique in mareries of detached operations had been going on below Vicksburg. The portion of the river that was virtually held by the enemy, from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, included the outlet of the Red River, by which provisions and stores from Louisiana and Texas, arms and ammunition from the Rio Grande, and detachments of men, were forwarded through the trans-Mississippi country. On the 2d of February Porter sent the Queen of the West, under Colonel Charles R. Ellet, to the Red River. Her passage of th
Deer Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
which entered the Mississippi a few miles above the mouth of the Yazoo. Black Bayou, which was little better than a narrow ditch, connected Steele's Bayou with Deer Creek, a tortuous river with a difficult and shallow channel. A second lateral bayou, called Rolling Fork, connected Deer Creek with the Sunflower. From Rolling ForDeer Creek with the Sunflower. From Rolling Fork the way was easy, but the difficulties of reaching that point were such that no commander with less than Porter's indefatigable energy and audacious readiness to take risks that promised a bare chance of success, would have ventured on the expedition. The flotilla, consisting of the remaining five Eads gun-boats, the Carondels in a position from which they could not be extricated. Under these circumstances, he wisely abandoned all thought of farther advance, and after dropping down Deer Creek until he fell in with the army, he succeeded, notwithstanding the additional obstructions which had been placed in the rivers, in retracing his course; and on t
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
held by the enemy, from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, included the outlet of the Red River, by which provisions and stores from Louisiana and Texas, arms and ammunition from the Rio Grande, and detachments of men, were forwarded through the trans-Mississippi country. On the 2d of February Porter sent the Queen of the West, under Colonel Charles R. Ellet, to the Red River. Her passage of the Vicksburg batteries alone and by daylight — for her start had been delayed for necessary repairs — was mad meantime repaired the Queen, fitted out an expedition composed of their prize, together with the Webb and two cotton-clad steamers. These followed the Indianola and overtook her a short distance below Warrenton. Engaging The Union vessels Mississippi and Winona at Baton Rouge. her at night, which gave them peculiar advantages, they succeeded in ramming her seven times, disabling her steering gear, and opening at last one great hole in her side. The Union vessel, reduced to a sinking cond
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
f June, by the combined forces of Flag-Officer Davis and Colonel Ellet [see Vol. I., pp. 449-459], the Mississippi squadron remained at Memphis for three weeks. Immediately after the battle Davis had formed the project of sending a force up the Arkansas and White rivers to cut off the Confederate gun-boats which were supposed to have taken refuge there, among them the Van Dorn, the only vessel remaining of Montgomery's flotilla. Davis did not know that the Van Dorn had made her way into the Yaendered and the Mississippi was now clear of obstructions to its mouth. Besides the main operations at Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the navy had been occupied from time to time in detached bodies at other points. A cut-off, at the mouth of the Arkansas, ingeniously made by Selfridge in April, had contributed materially to the facility of operations at that place. In May Lieutenant-Commander Wilson in the Mound City effectually destroyed a water-battery at Warrenton. In June an attack was mad
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
unique in maritime warfare in the energy and originality with which complex conditions were met. After the defeat of Montgomery's flotilla at Memphis, on the 6th of June, by the combined forces of Flag-Officer Davis and Colonel Ellet [see Vol. I.ederate gun-boats which were supposed to have taken refuge there, among them the Van Dorn, the only vessel remaining of Montgomery's flotilla. Davis did not know that the Van Dorn had made her way into the Yazoo. There were, however, two Confederatof fact there were at the time in the river two of Hollins's former fleet, the Polk and the Livingston, and the last of Montgomery's vessels, the Van Dorn. These were tied up abreast of a battery at Liverpool Landing, and above them was a barrier madgers gun-boats. He had also Ellet's nine rams and several very valuable captured vessels, including the Eastport, and Montgomery's rams captured at Memphis — the Bragg, Pillow, Price, and Little Rebel. The only vessels that had been withdrawn were
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
S. N. By the 1st of July, 1862, the Mississippi had been traversed by the fleet of Davis from Cairo down, and by that of Farragut from the Passes up, and the only point where the Confederates retach attacked them on June 9th. No serious obstruction, however, to the passage of the river from Cairo to the sea now existed, except at Vicksburg. The advance division of Farragut's squadron undeorter, as acting rear-admiral, assumed command of the Mississippi squadron at the naval depot at Cairo, which was now the headquarters. He received from Davis intact the squadron as it had come fromats, Chillicothe, Indianola, and Tuscumbia. On the 21st of November Porter issued orders from Cairo to Captain Henry Walke, then in command of the gun-boats patrolling the river below Helena, to eprepare for the attack on Chickasaw Bluffs. On December 23d, Porter, who had now come down from Cairo, went up the Yazoo with the Benton, Tyler, and Lexington, three tin-clads, and two rams. By thr
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
junction of the Tallahatchie and the Yazoo. The transports were close behind them. The Confederates had put to the fullest use the time given them by Smith's dilatory advance. A hastily constructed work of earth and cotton bales, called Fort Pemberton, was thrown up at the junction of the Tallahatchie and Yazoo, and though barely completed when the gun-boats arrived, it was armed and garrisoned, and in condition to receive them. The old Star of the West, of Fort Sumter fame, was sunk in tls fell to Foster of the Chillicothe. Finding that nothing more could be accomplished, Foster decided to return. On the way back he met General Quinby's troops descending the Tallahatchie, and at that officer's request steamed down again to Fort Pemberton. On the 5th of April the expedition withdrew, and on the 10th arrived in the Mississippi, about two months after it had started. About the middle of March, before the Yazoo Pass expedition returned, Porter decided to try another route, th
Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.74
the army, he succeeded, notwithstanding the additional obstructions which had been placed in the rivers, in retracing his course; and on the 24th of March, after almost incredible difficulties, his iron-clads arrived safe in the Mississippi. While the two expeditions were at work in the Yazoo Valley, a series of detached operations had been going on below Vicksburg. The portion of the river that was virtually held by the enemy, from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, included the outlet of the Red River, by which provisions and stores from Louisiana and Texas, arms and ammunition from the Rio Grande, and detachments of men, were forwarded through the trans-Mississippi country. On the 2d of February Porter sent the Queen of the West, under Colonel Charles R. Ellet, to the Red River. Her passage of the Vicksburg batteries alone and by daylight — for her start had been delayed for necessary repairs — was made in the true Ellet fashion. She was struck thrice before she got abreast of the t
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