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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
he war ended. An attempt followed to occupy Galveston, apparently under importunity from Brigadier-General Andrew J. Hamilton, and in furtherance of the policy that had led the Government to send him with the expedition as military governor of Texas. This resulted on the 1st of January in a military and naval disaster in which three companies of the 42d Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were taken prisoners by the Confederates under Magruder. On the 21st of Decemberbeen easy and must have influenced powerfully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to plant the flag at some point in Texas. The unaccountable failure at Sabine Pass followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston;
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
Rouge. From a sketch made at the time. to carry by assault a strong line of works, three miles long, impregnable on either flank and defended by 16,000 good troops; to lay siege to the place, with the certainty that it would be relieved from Mississippi and the prospect of losing his siege train in the venture; to leave Port Hudson in his rear and go against Vicksburg, thus sacrificing his communications, putting New Orleans in peril, and courting irreparable and almost inevitable disaster ass known, of course, of the phenomenal success of Grant's operations, nor could it have been surmised, while his precarious position in the event of a defeat or even a serious check was obvious enough; the magnitude of the Confederate forces in Mississippi and the energy habitual to their commanders everywhere, added an additional reason against delay. Finally the troops themselves, elated by their success in the Teche campaign, were in the best of spirits for an immediate attack. For these re
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
avy guns in position, and a garrison of 12,000 men-in-creased to 16,000 before Banks could have brought an equal number to the attack. Banks could not communicate with the commander of the northern column, and knew practically nothing of its movements. Under these conditions, all concert between the cooperating forces was rendered impossible from the start, and it became inevitable that the expectations of the Government that Banks would go against Vicksburg immediately on landing in Louisiana should be doomed to disappointment. The Confederate occupation of Port Hudson had completely changed the nature of the problem confided to General Banks for solution, for he had now to choose among three courses, each involving an impossibility: Return of a foraging party of the 24th Connecticut Volunteers to Baton Rouge. From a sketch made at the time. to carry by assault a strong line of works, three miles long, impregnable on either flank and defended by 16,000 good troops; to l
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
al J. B. Magruder, who had been barely a month in command of the district of Texas, had directed his attention as soon as he arrived to the defenseless condition of the coast, menaced as it was by the blockading fleet; thus it happened that Burrell's three companies found themselves confronted by two brigades (Scurry's and Sibley's, under Colonel Reily), an artillery regiment, 14 heavy guns, and 14 field-pieces. Magruder had also caused two improvised gun-boats to be equipped under an old California steamboat man, Captain Leon Smith; these were the Bayou City, Captain Henry Lubbock, and Neptune, Captain Sangster. Early in the morning of the 1st of January Magruder, having perfected his plans, under cover of a heavy artillery fire, assaulted the position of the 42d Massachusetts with two storming parties of 300 and 500 men respectively, led by Colonels Green, Bagby, and Cook, with the remainder of the troops under Brigadier-General W. R. Scurry in support. A sharp fight followed, but
Thompson's Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
d only because Vicksburg had fallen. The simple truth is that Port Hudson surrendered because its hour had come. The garrison was literally starving. With less than 3000 famished men in line, powerful mines beneath the salients, and a last assault about to be delivered at 10 paces, what else was left to do? With the post there fell into our hands 6340 prisoners, 20 heavy guns, 31 field-pieces, about 7500 muskets, and two river steamers. Starlight and Red Chief, found aground in Thompson's Creek, floated and brought into the river by the ingenuity and skill of Major Joseph Bailey, 4th Wisconsin, whose success here led to its repetition on the Red River the next year, when Admiral Porter's fleet was rescued.--R. B. I. Many of the guns were ruined, some had been struck over and over again, and the depots and magazines were empty. The garrison also lost about 500 prisoners or deserters before the surrender, and about 700 killed and wounded. Our loss was 707 killed, 3336 wounded,
Bayou Sara (United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
section of Cornay's battery, delayed the advance until Dwight's brigade, supported by two regiments of Birge's and March of the Nineteenth army Corps by the Bayou Sara road toward Port Hudson, Saturday, march 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. by Closson's battery, went out and drove them away. At 6 the division tookrespondence, the practical effect of which was to cause General Banks to conform his movements to the expectation that General Grant would send an army corps to Bayou Sara to join in reducing Port Hudson. Banks moved on to Alexandria, on the Red River, to push Taylor farther out of the way. Taylor retired toward Shreveport. Onrossing Bayou Montecino on the march to Port Hudson. From a sketch made at the time, whole command marched on Simsport, crossed the Atchafalaya, and moved to Bayou Sara, where the advance of the army crossed the Mississippi on the night of the 23d and moved immediately to the rear of Port Hudson. There communication was made
Ricohoc (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
oad toward Port Hudson, Saturday, march 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. by Closson's battery, went out and drove them away. At 6 the division took up the line of march to the Teche and bivouacked at nightfall on Madame Porter's plantation, five miles distant. Meanwhile Banks had moved Emory and Weitzel slowly up the Teche, seeking to hold Taylor's forces in position until Grover could gain their rear. Taylor fell back behind the intrenched lines below Centreville known as Fort Bisland, and there a brisk engagement took place on the 13th, Banks only seeking to gain a good position on both sides of the bayou, and to occupy the enemy's attention, while he listened in vain for Grover's guns, which were to have been the signal for a direct and determined attack in front. At night, knowing that Grover's movement must certainly have been seen and reported daring his passage up Grand Lake and surmising some miscarriage, Banks gave orders to carry the works by assault at day
Atchafalaya River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
ll until it should be occupied. Banks had finally to send his chief quartermaster back to Washington before these deficiencies could be supplied. Again, Banks had not been informed until he reached New Orleans that the Confederates held in force any fortified place below Vicksburg, yet Port Hudson, 135 miles above New Orleans, was found strongly intrenched, with Sharp-Shooters of the 75th N. Y. Volunteers picking off the gunners of the Confederate gun-boat cotton, in the action at Bayou Teche, La., January 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. 21 heavy guns in position, and a garrison of 12,000 men-in-creased to 16,000 before Banks could have brought an equal number to the attack. Banks could not communicate with the commander of the northern column, and knew practically nothing of its movements. Under these conditions, all concert between the cooperating forces was rendered impossible from the start, and it became inevitable that the expectations of the Governmen
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
The capture of Port Hudson. by Richard B. Irwin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. General Banks arrived in New Orleans on the 14th of December, 1862, with the advance of a fleet of transports from New York and Hampton Roads, bringing reenforcements for the Department of the Gulf. These reenforcements finally included 39 regiments of infantry (of which 22 were 9-months' men), six batteries of artillery, and one battalion of cavalry. On the 15th he took command of the department, Butler then formally taking leave of the troops. His orders were to move up the Mississippi, in order to open the river, in cooperation with McClernand's column from Cairo. Banks was to take command of the combined forces as soon as they should meet. On the 16th General Grover, with 12 regiments and a battery, without disembarking at New Orleans, accompanied by two batteries and two troops of cavalry from the old force, and convoyed by a detachment of Farragut's fleet under
Grand Lake (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
their rear. Taylor fell back behind the intrenched lines below Centreville known as Fort Bisland, and there a brisk engagement took place on the 13th, Banks only seeking to gain a good position on both sides of the bayou, and to occupy the enemy's attention, while he listened in vain for Grover's guns, which were to have been the signal for a direct and determined attack in front. At night, knowing that Grover's movement must certainly have been seen and reported daring his passage up Grand Lake and surmising some miscarriage, Banks gave orders to carry the works by assault at daylight. However, early in the night, Taylor ordered his whole force to fall back on Franklin; the sounds of the movement were heard, and toward daylight reconnoitering parties discovered the evacuation. Banks's whole force at once moved in pursuit. Early in the morning Taylor met Grover advancing against his line of retreat, which here follows the great bow of the Teche, known as Irish Bend, struck Bi
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