hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 618 0 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 585 15 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 560 2 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 372 0 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 333 11 Browse Search
George G. Meade 325 5 Browse Search
Winfield S. Hancock 321 3 Browse Search
Philip H. Sheridan 313 7 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 278 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

Found 587 total hits in 109 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
ack were also made. On James Island strong works were built to close the approach from Stono River. Stono inlet and harbor were occupied by an inclosed fort on Cole's Island, which held under control all the anchorage ground and landing-place inside the Stono bar. This advanced position was abandoned by the enemy prior to the naval attack on Fort Sumter, giving us the possession of Folly Island and the lower Stono and inlet. The upper Stono was held by a heavily armed earth-work called Fort Pemberton, and the water approach to Charleston by Wappoo Cut, west of James Island Creek, was defended by powerful earth-works, while strong batteries on the eastern shore of James Island swept all the practicable water routes from Morris and Folly islands. North-east of the city a line of intrenchments reaching from Copahee Sound to Wandoo River guarded the land approaches from Bull's Bay. Suitable works were also built on the peninsula in the rear of the city, covering the roads from the inte
places both on the sea and channel faces completely torn away from the terre-plein. The place, in fine, was a ruin, and effectually disabled for any immediate defense of the harbor of Charleston. Having accomplished the end proposed, orders were accordingly issued on the evening of the 23d for the firing to cease, having been continuously sustained for seven days. There had been thrown 5009 projectiles, of which about one-half had struck the fort. Colonel Alfred Rhett, C. S. A., commanding Fort Sumter, reports, August 24th, One 11-inch Dahlgren, east face, the only gun serviceable ; and on September 1st, We have not a gun en barbette that can be fired; only one gun and casemate. General Stephen Elliott, C. S. A., writes as follows: When I assumed command of Fort Sumter on the 4th of September, 1863, there were no guns in position except one 32-pounder in one of the north-west casemates. This gun was merely used for firing at sunset, and was not intended for any other purpo
Stephen Elliott (search for this): chapter 1.8
-inch Dahlgren, east face, the only gun serviceable ; and on September 1st, We have not a gun en barbette that can be fired; only one gun and casemate. General Stephen Elliott, C. S. A., writes as follows: When I assumed command of Fort Sumter on the 4th of September, 1863, there were no guns in position except one 32-poundetary of the Navy, 1863; and also official correspondence in Engineer and Artillery Operations against the Defenses of Charleston Harbor in 1863.--Q. A. G. General Elliott [Confederate] reports in his journal, November 20th, that at 3 o'clock a detachment of the enemy's barges, variously estimated at from four to nine in number,r even contemplated by The marsh Battery after the explosion of the swamp Angel. from a photograph. the land forces after the naval repulse in September. General Elliott's statement that positive attacks were not made is strictly true, of course, because no semblance of an attack was made. The boat party seen was doubtless th
H. W. Benham (search for this): chapter 1.8
sive works on the south end of Folly Island a semblance of activity was conspicuously displayed. Brigadier-General A. H. Terry's division, about 4000 effective, and Brigadier-General George C. Strong's brigade, numbering about 2500, were quietly added to the Folly Island command under cover of darkness. The project for securing a lodgment on Morris Island comprised, as one of its features, a demonstration in force on James Island by way of Stono River, over the same ground where Brigadier-General Benham had met with repulse the year before. The object in the present case was to prevent the sending of reenforcements to the enemy on Morris Island from that quarter, and possibly to draw a portion of the Morris Island garrison in that direction. Everything being in readiness, the character of the assault about to be ordered, the risk involved therein, and the magnitude of the interests at stake became for the moment subjects of grave consideration. For if this assault failed, the pr
John A. Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 1.8
r operations against Charleston; but he was not permitted to enter upon this new field of labor, his sudden and untimely death leaving the command with Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. [See p. 46.] Charleston was located in the Military Department of the South, comprising the narrow strip of sea-coast held by the Union forces in river had to be passed in full view under fire. All our Folly Island batteries opened before sunrise, and soon after this four iron-clad monitors, led by Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, steamed up abreast of Morris Island and took part in the action. After the cannonade had lasted nearly two hours General Strong was signaled to push forwrown 5009 projectiles, of which about one-half had struck the fort. Colonel Alfred Rhett, C. S. A., commanding Fort Sumter, reports, August 24th, One 11-inch Dahlgren, east face, the only gun serviceable ; and on September 1st, We have not a gun en barbette that can be fired; only one gun and casemate. General Stephen Ellio
John S. Chatfield (search for this): chapter 1.8
y voice, and replied, No, General, I think not; only a severe flesh-wound in the hip. He was taken to Beaufort that night and placed in hospital under excellent attendance. But he was seized with a yearning desire to go home, and, without my knowledge, took the first steamer for the North. Being the senior officer on board, the excitement of the trip, aggravated by the chase and capture of a blockade-runner, brought on lock-jaw, of which he died shortly after reaching New York. Colonel John S. Chatfield was mortally wounded; Colonel Haldimand S. Putnam and Colonel Robert G. Shaw were killed; and Brigadier-General Truman Seymour and several regimental commanders were wounded. It may be said that in making this assault the traditions and maxims of the engineer and his reverence for the spade and shovel as weapons of war were placed in abeyance. Although no dissenting voice was raised among the subordinate commanders called into council, it may be doubted by some whether a step s
George C. Strong (search for this): chapter 1.8
activity was conspicuously displayed. Brigadier-General A. H. Terry's division, about 4000 effective, and Brigadier-General George C. Strong's brigade, numbering about 2500, were quietly added to the Folly Island command under cover of darkness. a small brigade was silently embarked in rowboats in Folly River behind Folly Island. It was commanded by Brigadier-General George C. Strong, who had received orders to carry the south end of Morris Island by storm. By break of day the leading boaen, steamed up abreast of Morris Island and took part in the action. After the cannonade had lasted nearly two hours General Strong was signaled to push forward and make the attack. This was promptly and gallantly done under a hot fire. The men dir distant front. Brigadier-General Truman Seymour organized and commanded the assaulting column, composed of Brigadier-General G. C. Strong's brigade supported by the brigade of Colonel Haldimand S. Putnam. As the column left the line of our batter
Foxhall A. Parker (search for this): chapter 1.8
t Battery Wagner, and the second parallel on the night of the 23d by the flying sap, about six hundred yards in advance of the first. Eleven of the breaching guns against Fort Sumter were located in these two parallels, and the other seven to the left and rear of the first parallel. Those in the second parallel were perilously near to Battery Wagner, the most advanced piece being only 820 yards distant from the guns of that work. One of the batteries was efficiently commanded by Commander Foxhall A. Parker, U. S. N. On the night of August 9th the position selected for the third parallel was reached by the flying sap, 330 yards in advance of the right of the second parallel. It was deemed inexpedient to push the approaches beyond this point until after the breaching batteries should open on Fort Sumter. From this time forward the fire from the enemy's guns in our front and on our extreme left was severe and. almost uninterrupted. So incessant had it become that many officers and
John W. Turner (search for this): chapter 1.8
an incurable wound. Large masses of the brick walls and parapets were rapidly loosened and thrown down. The bulk of our fire was directed against the gorge and south-east face, which presented themselves diagonally to us. They were soon pierced through and through, and cut down on top to the casemate arches. The shot that went over them took the north and north-west faces in reverse. The condition of the work, as it appeared to us after six days bombardment, is thus described by General J. W. Turner, chief of artillery: The fire upon the gorge had by the morning of the 23d succeeded in destroying every gun upon its parapet, and as far as could be observed had disabled or dismounted all the guns upon the parapet of the two faces looking toward the city which it had taken in reverse. The parapet and rampart of the gorge were for nearly the entire length of the face completely demolished, and in places everything was swept off down to the arches, the debris forming an accessibl
E. G. Parrott (search for this): chapter 1.8
mile and more. [See Vol. II., p. 9.] But the fact that we could throw heavier metal and do heavier work now than we could then, promised success, and the placing of guns in position against Fort Sumter was promptly begun. For this purpose 16 Parrott rifles and two Whitworth rifles were placed in batteries at distances from Fort Sumter ranging from 3428 to 4290 yards. The slow, tedious, and hazardous labor of moving into position and mounting these heavy guns and their carriages could be pery's troops and batteries, gun-boats had been built and were then building along its water front, and the avenue of escape for non-combatants was open and undisputed. The demand being refused [see p. 17], the marsh battery, containing one 8-inch Parrott rifle, previously referred to as the Swamp Angel, opened fire on the night of August 21st. The gun burst on the second night at the thirty-sixth round. Some of the projectiles reached a distance of about five and three-quarter miles. Firing o
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...