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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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A. H. Terry (search for this): chapter 1.8
he attack against the combined fire of artillery and small-arms. Yet this was the work we had set out to do, and it was believed we had the men to do it. The demonstration up the Stono River was begun in the afternoon of July 8th, by Brigadier-General Terry, who landed on James Island with about 3800 men. The effect as subsequently ascertained was to draw a portion of the enemy's forces from our front on Morris Island. It is understood that General Beauregard denies this.-Q. A. . But seeth parallel was established on the night of August 21st, about five hundred yards in advance of the third. From this point the ridge was carried [by the 24th Massachusetts] at the point of the bayonet on the 26th, under the direction of Brigadier-General Terry, and the fifth parallel was established thereon. The resistance to our advance now assumed a most obstinate and determined character, being evidently under skillful and intelligent direction, while the firing from the James Island batte
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 1.8
a portion of the enemy's forces from our front on Morris Island. It is understood that General Beauregard denies this.-Q. A. . But see p. 14.--editors. On the evening of July 9th a small brigative attacks were not made. From this Colonel Alfred Roman, in his Military operations of General Beauregard, makes the statement that another boat attack was made by General Gillmore's forces againsile fleet, than at the time the city and its defenses were evacuated in February, 1865. General Beauregard, in correcting what he calls errors in the preliminary official dispatch sent from the fielf. No one should concede the soundness of this principle more freely than an engineer of General Beauregard's attainments and varied experience. Measured by this, the only appropriate standard, Bathe character of the Confederate defense, Colonel Alfred Roman [ The Military operations of General Beauregard ] aptly says: It is a matter of history to-day that the defense of Fort Sumter and that of
Henry W. Benham (search for this): chapter 1.8
ey, who had immediate command of the defense, recently stated that he had under his control 385 pieces of artillery of all calibers, including field-batteries, and an ample force of skilled men to serve them. When the position was evacuated by the Confederates, February 18th, 1865, 246 guns were left behind in the several works. The James Island defenses were especially strong. They had repulsed a bold and spirited assault upon them from the Stono River side, made by forces under General H. W. Benham, on the 16th of June, 1862, and had been greatly strengthened since that time. A gallant and well-directed attack upon Fort Sumter on April 7th, 1863, by a squadron composed of nine iron-clad vessels, under command of Rear-Admiral Du Pont, had signally failed, after a sharp engagement lasting about one hour. [See p. 32.] The squadron carried 15-inch and 1-inch shell guns and 150-pounder Parrott rifles. Five of the iron-clads were reported by their respective commanders to be whol
S. F. Du Pont (search for this): chapter 1.8
neral H. W. Benham, on the 16th of June, 1862, and had been greatly strengthened since that time. A gallant and well-directed attack upon Fort Sumter on April 7th, 1863, by a squadron composed of nine iron-clad vessels, under command of Rear-Admiral Du Pont, had signally failed, after a sharp engagement lasting about one hour. [See p. 32.] The squadron carried 15-inch and 1-inch shell guns and 150-pounder Parrott rifles. Five of the iron-clads were reported by their respective commanders toceived the fire from the Sullivan's Island, the Morris Island, and the Mount Pleasant batteries, as well as from Fort Sumter, and during the attack divided its own fire between Fort Wagner, Fort Sumter, and Fort Moultrie. After this repulse Admiral Du Pont expressed the opinion that Charleston could not be taken by a purely naval attack, and some of his subordinate commanders held similar views. At Washington it was deemed of so much importance to present an actively aggressive front in this
John Johnson (search for this): chapter 1.8
from it or open the way to a successful assault. After the first assault Battery Wagner was inclosed [see p. 23]; it reached entirely across the island from water to water; it mounted some heavy guns for channel defense, and several siege-guns that swept the narrow beach over which we would have to approach from the south; and a large bomb-proof shelter afforded the garrison absolute protection when the fire became so hot that they could not stand to their guns or man the parapet. Major John Johnson writes to the editors that the heavy guns for channel defense consisted of two 10-inch Columbiads; also, that absolute protection was afforded to about 600 men, little more than half the garrison. To us the place presented the appearance of a succession of low, irregular sand-hills like the rest of the island. Battery Gregg, on the north end of the island at Cumming's Point, was known to be armed with guns bearing on the channel. Of one important topographical change we were entirely
Israel Vogdes (search for this): chapter 1.8
under-growth from the view of the enemy on the opposite side of Light-House inlet. They were intended to operate against his batteries there, protect the column of boats in its advance across the stream, or cover its retreat in case of repulse. The entrance to Stono inlet was lighted up at night, and all transports bringing troops were ordered to enter after dark and leave before morning. All appearance of preparations for offensive operations was carefully suppressed, while upon General Israel Vogdes's defensive works on the south end of Folly Island a semblance of activity was conspicuously displayed. Brigadier-General A. H. Terry's division, about 4000 effective, and Brigadier-General George C. Strong's brigade, numbering about 2500, were quietly added to the Folly Island command under cover of darkness. The project for securing a lodgment on Morris Island comprised, as one of its features, a demonstration in force on James Island by way of Stono River, over the same ground
Edward W. Serrell (search for this): chapter 1.8
a heavy rifle. The obvious and commonly adopted remedy for this weakness is to strengthen the walls with metal shields or armor plating, rather than discard all protection by resorting to open batteries or earth-works, in which both guns and gunners are in full view of the enemy. It might be impossible to serve guns so exposed, even for a brief period, against armored or iron-clad ships showering grape and canister from large calibers, and leaden bullets from machine-guns Brevet Brigadier-General E. W. Serrell (see P. 72) from a photograph. and sharp-shooters. The protection of the men at their guns is beyond question a consideration of the highest moment; it is indeed an essential consideration. Even in our casemated works special precautions are taken to prevent the entrance of missiles. In those last built the embrasures were supplied with iron shutters to stop grape, canister, and rifle bullets, so that the men might not be driven from their guns. The lessons of all modern
Richard Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.8
signed to resist a naval attack only. They comprised: (1) Fort Sumter, a strong brick work, as strength was reckoned in those days, mounting two tiers of guns in casemates and one tier en barbette. It stands on the southern edge of the channel, distant three and one-third miles from the nearest point of the city. It was planned for 135 guns, but never received its full armament. The embrasures or ports of the second tier, not having been finished when the war began, were bricked up by Major Anderson's command early in 1861, and were left in that condition until destroyed by our fire from Morris Island. When this fort fell into the enemy's hands, April 14th, 1861, it contained seventy-eight pieces of serviceable ordnance, all smooth-bores, ranging from 24-pounders to 10-inch Columbiads. (2) Fort Moultrie, a brick work located on Sullivan's Island about one mile from Fort Sumter, mounting one tier of guns en barbette. Before the outbreak of the war its armament consisted of fifty-two
determined, as well to hasten the final result as to revive the flagging spirits of the men, to carry on simultaneously against Battery Wagner two distinct kinds of attack: First, to silence the work by an overpowering bombardment with siege and Coehorn mortars, so that our sappers would have only the James Island batteries to annoy them; and, second, to breach the bomb-proof shelter with our heavy rifles, and thus force a surrender. During the day-time the New Ironsides, Captain S. C. Rowan, was to cooperate with her eight-gun broadsides. These operations were actively begun at break of day on the 5th of September. Seventeen siege and Coehorn mortars dropped their shells unceasingly into the work over the heads of our sappers; ten light siege-rifles covered and swept the approach to the work from the rear; fourteen heavy Parrotts thundered away at the great bomb-proof shelter; while, during the daylight, the New Ironsides, with the most admirable regularity and precision, kept
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.8
ving the sea islands, upon which the enemy derived no advantage from his superior strength or from the railroad facilities under his control for concentrating troops and bringing reinforcements from the interior on short notice. It was finally decided that the army should undertake the capture of Morris Island and the reduction of Fort Sumter, unless it should become necessary, before preparations for the attack were completed, to detach some of the troops for the purpose of reenforcing General Grant or General Banks, then operating on the Mississippi; and it was announced with emphasis that no additional troops would be sent to South Carolina. The capture of the city by a land attack was not, in any sense, the object of these operations. No project of that nature was discussed or even mentioned at the conference. The following general plan of campaign was agreed upon, comprising four distinct steps, and the army was to take the lead in executing the first, second, and third. Fi
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