hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 618 0 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 585 15 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 560 2 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 372 0 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 333 11 Browse Search
George G. Meade 325 5 Browse Search
Winfield S. Hancock 321 3 Browse Search
Philip H. Sheridan 313 7 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 278 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

Found 363 total hits in 113 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
idge found himself in command of only about 1000 or 1500 men in a department large enough to require an army corps to defend it. This handful was concentrated at the salt-works in hopes of defending a position naturally very strong, even against so large an opposing force. Stone-man, doubtless aware of this fact, and knowing the defenseless condition of the country, changed the ordinary tactics and devoted himself to capturing the towns and destroying the railroad. He occupied Bristol and Abingdon, and passing by the salt-works advanced upon Wytheville and the lead-mines. In hopes of arresting his course Breckinridge moved from the salt-works to Marion, on the railroad, where he intercepted Stoneman on Sunday, the 18th of December, and fought an engagement which lasted through the day and resulted in a substantial victory for the Confederates, who held their position against largely superior numbers. But during the day Stoneman sent a force down another road to the salt-works, now
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
er County, and arrested by General Marshall in an engagement on the 16th of May, which resulted in the repulse and retreat of the invading force, whose killed and wounded were left behind. [See Vol. II., p. 280.] On the 3d of September, 1863, Burnside occupied Knoxville, Tennessee, with his army corps. General J. M. Shaekelford commanded Burnside's cavalry force in the Knoxville campaign.--editors. Nearly all the available Confederate forces had been ordered to reenforce Bragg at Chattanooga. A small force under Brigadier-General Alfred E. Jackson occupied the upper portion of east Tennessee. Marshall had been transferred to the Brigadier-General J. M. Shackelford. From a photograph. Western army, and Colonel Henry L. Giltner, of the 4th Kentucky Cavalry, with a handful of troops, occupied the Department of South-western Virginia. On the 7th of September about five hundred of Burnside's infantry advanced as far east as Telford's Depot, in Washington County. On the
Wytheville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
om a photograph. General Ammen commanded the District of east Tennessee, April 10, 1864, to January 14, 1865. force, under General Averell, made an advance on Wytheville, but was met at Crockett's Cove by General John H. Morgan and defeated, leaving forty dead on the field. In June, 1864, Colonel E. F. Clay, of the 1st Kentucy tactics and devoted himself to capturing the towns and destroying the railroad. He occupied Bristol and Abingdon, and passing by the salt-works advanced upon Wytheville and the lead-mines. In hopes of arresting his course Breckinridge moved from the salt-works to Marion, on the railroad, where he intercepted Stoneman on SundayFrom Boone the command crossed the Blue Ridge to Wilkesboro‘, and then turned toward south-western Virginia, destroying the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad from Wytheville nearly to Lynchburg. On the 9th of April Stoneman moved again into North Carolina, via Jacksonville, Taylorsville, and Germantown. At Germantown the force div
Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
the withdrawal of Colonel Carter's force. In the latter part of September, 1863, Brigadier-General John S. Williams assumed command of the Confederate forces in east Tennessee and advanced as far as Blue Springs. Burnside's forces occupied Bull's Gap, nine miles in front. Williams was ordered not to give up an inch of ground until driven from it. He had only about seventeen hundred effective men, with two batteries of artillery. Brigadier-General Alfred E. Jackson, with about five hundreing the Department of the Cumberland, to direct General Stoneman to repeat the raid of last fall, destroying the railroad as far toward Lynchburg as he can. Stoneman set out from Knoxville about the 20th of March, and moved, via Morristown and Bull's Gap, across Iron Mountain to Boone, North Carolina. Stoneman's force consisted of General A. C. Gillem's division. The brigade commanders were Colonels S. B. Brown, W. J. Palmer, and J. K. Miller. From Boone the command crossed the Blue Ridge to
Iron Mountain, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
e before Breckinridge's forces could reach there. Having accomplished this long-desired object, the Federal forces withdrew across the mountains. On the 27th of February, 1865, General Grant instructed General Thomas, commanding the Department of the Cumberland, to direct General Stoneman to repeat the raid of last fall, destroying the railroad as far toward Lynchburg as he can. Stoneman set out from Knoxville about the 20th of March, and moved, via Morristown and Bull's Gap, across Iron Mountain to Boone, North Carolina. Stoneman's force consisted of General A. C. Gillem's division. The brigade commanders were Colonels S. B. Brown, W. J. Palmer, and J. K. Miller. From Boone the command crossed the Blue Ridge to Wilkesboro‘, and then turned toward south-western Virginia, destroying the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad from Wytheville nearly to Lynchburg. On the 9th of April Stoneman moved again into North Carolina, via Jacksonville, Taylorsville, and Germantown. At Germantown
Jonesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
troyed the bridges over the Holston and Watauga rivers. General Humphrey Marshall was at that time in command of the Department of Western Virginia and Eastern Kentucky. His troops were widely scattered over the country in order to obtain subsistence, and before they could be concentrated the enemy had retreated across the mountains into Kentucky. The raiders were prevented from occupying Bristol and doing further damage by the timely arrival of General Marshall's force, which pursued to Jonesville. In May, 1862, a much larger invading force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, numbering several thousand, was led up the Kanawha and New rivers, West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox. This column was met at Princeton, in Mercer County, and arrested by General Marshall in an engagement on the 16th of May, which resulted in the repulse and retreat of the invading force, whose killed and wounded were left behind. [See Vol. II., p. 280.] On the 3d of September, 1863, Burnside occupie
Bristol (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
hat Breckinridge found himself in command of only about 1000 or 1500 men in a department large enough to require an army corps to defend it. This handful was concentrated at the salt-works in hopes of defending a position naturally very strong, even against so large an opposing force. Stone-man, doubtless aware of this fact, and knowing the defenseless condition of the country, changed the ordinary tactics and devoted himself to capturing the towns and destroying the railroad. He occupied Bristol and Abingdon, and passing by the salt-works advanced upon Wytheville and the lead-mines. In hopes of arresting his course Breckinridge moved from the salt-works to Marion, on the railroad, where he intercepted Stoneman on Sunday, the 18th of December, and fought an engagement which lasted through the day and resulted in a substantial victory for the Confederates, who held their position against largely superior numbers. But during the day Stoneman sent a force down another road to the sal
South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
east Tennessee, April 10, 1864, to January 14, 1865. force, under General Averell, made an advance on Wytheville, but was met at Crockett's Cove by General John H. Morgan and defeated, leaving forty dead on the field. In June, 1864, Colonel E. F. Clay, of the 1st Kentucky Mounted Rifles, in command of a small brigade of Confederate cavalry, was sent into Kentucky Map of operations against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, Lynchburg, Va., to Knoxville, Tenn. from the Department of South-western Virginia to secure forage and cover other military movements. Colonel Clay first advanced upon Paintsville, with a view of capturing some four hundred Federals who were camped there. Difficulties in the way of his advance delayed his arrival until the enemy had received large reenforeements, which deterred him from making an attack. Retiring upon Licking River, he camped in the narrow valley of a little stream known as Puncheon. Though he had taken every precaution to guard again
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
and retreat of the invading force, whose killed and wounded were left behind. [See Vol. II., p. 280.] On the 3d of September, 1863, Burnside occupied Knoxville, Tennessee, with his army corps. General J. M. Shaekelford commanded Burnside's cavalry force in the Knoxville campaign.--editors. Nearly all the available Confedommand of a small brigade of Confederate cavalry, was sent into Kentucky Map of operations against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, Lynchburg, Va., to Knoxville, Tenn. from the Department of South-western Virginia to secure forage and cover other military movements. Colonel Clay first advanced upon Paintsville, with a vie of the Cumberland, to direct General Stoneman to repeat the raid of last fall, destroying the railroad as far toward Lynchburg as he can. Stoneman set out from Knoxville about the 20th of March, and moved, via Morristown and Bull's Gap, across Iron Mountain to Boone, North Carolina. Stoneman's force consisted of General A. C. Gi
Licking River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10.70
Map of operations against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, Lynchburg, Va., to Knoxville, Tenn. from the Department of South-western Virginia to secure forage and cover other military movements. Colonel Clay first advanced upon Paintsville, with a view of capturing some four hundred Federals who were camped there. Difficulties in the way of his advance delayed his arrival until the enemy had received large reenforeements, which deterred him from making an attack. Retiring upon Licking River, he camped in the narrow valley of a little stream known as Puncheon. Though he had taken every precaution to guard against surprise, an important order had not been executed, and at 2 P. M. the enemy in force surprised his camp, attacking it from the surrounding mountains. After a desperate resistance he was forced to withdraw, leaving thirty-seven prisoners in the enemy's hands--nine wounded, two of them mortally. Colonel Clay lost his right eye during the engagement. Late in Sep
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...