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Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
rated by the disease. After delaying a week at Cardenas and Havana, Maffitt determined to attempt to run the blockade at Mobile. The squadron, at this time off Mobile, was composed of the sloop-of-war Oneida and the gun-boat Winona, under CommandMobile, was composed of the sloop-of-war Oneida and the gun-boat Winona, under Commander George H. Preble. The Oneida was just completing repairs to her boilers, and was working at a reduced speed. At 5 o'clock on the afternoon of the 4th of September the Florida was sighted in the distance. At this moment the Winona was just returssed out of range, and was making her way up the main ship-channel to Fort Morgan. The Florida remained four months at Mobile completing her repairs and equipment and filling up her crew. On the night of January 15th, 1863, she ran the blockade oand chased the Florida during the whole of the next day, but at night lost sight of her. Within ten days after leaving Mobile the Florida captured and burnt three vessels. Maffitt then put into Nassau, where he was warmly received and, in violati
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 12.90
nt of men or supply of equipments, and presently the crew, which numbered only twenty-two, was attacked by yellow fever, until nearly every one on board, including the captain, was prostrated by the disease. After delaying a week at Cardenas and Havana, Maffitt determined to attempt to run the blockade at Mobile. The squadron, at this time off Mobile, was composed of the sloop-of-war Oneida and the gun-boat Winona, under Commander George H. Preble. The Oneida was just completing repairs to oin battle, under the belief that the odds against him were too great, although the Niagara carried ten heavy rifles, and the Sacramento two 11-inch guns. The Stonewall steamed that night to Lisbon, thence to Teneriffe and Nassau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his officers and men and received possession of the ve
Palermo (Italy) (search for this): chapter 12.90
f the neutrality laws, he lost no time in closing a contract with the firm of Fawcett & Preston, engine builders, of Liverpool, for a screw gun-vessel. The steamer was named the Oreto, and it was announced that she was being built for a firm at Palermo; presumably for the Italian Government. She was a duplicate of the gun-vessels of the English navy. The construction of the vessel proceeded without interruption during the fall and winter of 1861-62. The American Minister, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, twice called the attention of the Foreign Office to her suspected character, and pro forma inquiries were set on foot, but they failed to show evidence of her real destination. The Oreto therefore cleared without difficulty for Palermo and Jamaica, a Liverpool merchant, representing the Palermo firm, having sworn that he was the owner, and an English captain having been appointed to the command. On the 22d of March the vessel sailed from Liverpool. At the same time the steamer Baham
Japan (Japan) (search for this): chapter 12.90
iagara carried ten heavy rifles, and the Sacramento two 11-inch guns. The Stonewall steamed that night to Lisbon, thence to Teneriffe and Nassau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his officers and men and received possession of the vessel. She was subsequently turned over to the United States, and finally sold to Japan. Another cruiser, the Tallahassee, was originally the English blockade-runner Atlanta, and made two trips from Bermuda to Wilmington in the summer of 1864. She was then fitted out and armed as a cruiser, and on the 6th of August sailed from Wilmington under Commander John T. Wood. Her cruise lasted less than three weeks, but was remarkably successful. It extended along the United States coast and so on to Halifax. The small coasters and fishing vessels were totally unprepared for an e
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 12.90
en and captured. Soon after these events the Florida proceeded to Brest, where she remained for six months undergoing repairs. She sailed in February, 1864, under the command of Captain C. M. Morris. After cruising for four months in the North Atlantic, she visited Bermuda, where she obtained supplies of coal. During the summer she continued her cruise in the Atlantic, destroying merchantmen in the neighborhood of the United States coast. On the 5th of October the Florida arrived at Bahor warlike use against the United States, and recommended that she be seized without loss of time; but on that very day she left Liverpool, ostensibly on a trial trip, and, after completing her preparations at Point Lynas, made her way to the North Atlantic. The third of the Confederate vessels obtained abroad was the Georgia. In the latter part of 1862, Commander Matthew F. Maury, who had acquired great distinction as a scientific man while in the old navy, was sent to England partly to inf
where she was laid up and finally sold. The Confederate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For this purpose it sent several agents to Europe. The foremost of these was Captain James D. Bulloch, of the Confederate navy, who arrived in England and established himself at Liverpool in June, 1861. Having satisfied himself as to the scope and bearing of the neutrality laws, he lost no timntic under Lieutenant William L. Maury. During her cruise she captured only eight vessels, her movements being restricted by her want of sail-power and her limited coal capacity. The operations of the Confederate cruisers having their base in Europe were now under the principal direction of Commodore Samuel Barron, senior officer at Paris. Barron, having no further use for the Georgia, sent her to Liverpool in May, 1864, to be disposed of by Bulloch. She was sold on June 1st to Mr. Edwin B
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.90
e. The foremost of these was Captain James D. Bulloch, of the Confederate navy, who arrived in England and established himself at Liverpool in June, 1861. Having satisfied himself as to the scope arable to Brazil, and Captain Collins was tried by court-martial. The second cruiser built in England, through the agency of Captain Bulloch, was the Alabama, whose career is described in another paury, who had acquired great distinction as a scientific man while in the old navy, was sent to England partly to influence public opinion in favor of the Confederacy, and also with a general authori, being found guilty, were sentenced to pay a fine of £ 50 each. The Confederate operations in England did not suffer motions so much from the penalty inflicted upon the guilty parties as from the sd it was evident to Bulloch that no ships specially fitted for war could safely be purchased in England. He therefore turned his attention to securing a merchant vessel which should answer the requi
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
The Confederate cruisers. by Professor James Russell Soley, U. S. N. The first of the ocean cruisers of the Confederate navy, as distinguished from the privateers, was the Sumter. This steamer, formerly the Habana, of the New Orleans and Havana line, was altered into a ship-of-war in April and May, 1861, and, under the command of Captain Raphael Semmes, escaped from the Mississippi early in July, after an unsuccessful chase by the Brooklyn, which was at the time blockading the mouth of the river. Her cruise lasted six months, during which she made fifteen prizes. Of these seven were destroyed, one was ransomed, one recaptured, and the remaining six were sent into Cienfuegos, where they were released by the Cuban authorities. In January the Sumter arrived at Gibraltar, where she was laid up and finally sold. The Confederate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For thi
ix 6-inch guns, and became a veritable Confederate cruiser, under the command of Commander J. N. Maffitt, of the Confederate navy. Her course was first shaped for Cuba. Here Maffitt hoped to obtain certain essential parts of his ordnance which had not been supplied at Nassau, and also to ship a crew. The authorities in Cuba, hoCuba, however, prohibited any shipment of men or supply of equipments, and presently the crew, which numbered only twenty-two, was attacked by yellow fever, until nearly every one on board, including the captain, was prostrated by the disease. After delaying a week at Cardenas and Havana, Maffitt determined to attempt to run the blockadeau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his officers and men and received possession of the vessel. She was subsequently turned over to the United States
Lisbon (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12.90
into Ferrol for repairs. Here she was found by the Niagara and Sacramento, under Commodore T. T. Craven, who took up a position in the adjoining port of Coruña. On the 24th of March the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and lay for several hours off the entrance of Corufia; Craven, however, declined to join battle, under the belief that the odds against him were too great, although the Niagara carried ten heavy rifles, and the Sacramento two 11-inch guns. The Stonewall steamed that night to Lisbon, thence to Teneriffe and Nassau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his officers and men and received possession of the vessel. She was subsequently turned over to the United States, and finally sold to Japan. Another cruiser, the Tallahassee, was originally the English blockade-runner Atlanta, and made two trip
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