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Newton M. Curtis (search for this): chapter 14.96
nnoissance on December 25th, 1864, having drawn our fire by an advance of his skirmish-line to within 75 yards of the fort, that General Godfrey Weitzel, finding the works substantially uninjured by the explosion of the powder-ship [see p. 655] and the two days terrific bombardment of Porter's great armada, reported to Butler that the fort could not be carried by assault. General B. F. Butler in his report of the operations of his troops, says in part: Brevet Brigadier-General [N. M.] Curtis, who deserves well for his gallantry and conduct, immediately pushed up his brigade within a few hundred yards of Fort Fisher, capturing the Half-moon battery and its men, who were taken off by the boats of the navy. In the meantime tile remainder of Ames's division had captured 218 men and 10 commissioned officers of the North Carolina reserves and other prisoners. From them I learned that Kirkland's and Hagood's brigades of Hoke's division had left the front of tile Army of the James, ne
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 14.96
camp for the Army of Wilmington, under General Braxton Bragg, the department commander, that was hit distinguish between friend and foe. [See General Bragg's statement, note, p. 654.] At the lanm the conformation of the Cape Fear River, General Bragg could have passed safely from Sugar Loaf tnd demoralized by the ordeal through which, by Bragg's neglect, they had been forced to pass. I sed at my request he immediately telegraphed General Bragg, at Sugar Loaf : The enemy are about twhich had slain them. Still no tidings from Bragg. The enemy's advance had ceased entirely; proainingly from his two wounds. He told me that Bragg had ignored his presence in the fort and had nwould have been practicable in the presence of Bragg's force, had it been under a competent officeriety papers may be found a letter from General Braxton Bragg to his brother, dated Wilmington, fiverting most of General Bragg's statements. General Bragg says (more emphatically but substantially [16 more...]
ficers and men if they would follow me; they all responded fearlessly that they would. I returned to my post, and, giving the order Charge bayonets, sprang upon the breastwork, waved my sword, and, as I gave the command Forward! Double-quick, march! fell on my knees, a rifle-ball having entered my left hip. We were met by a heavy volley, aimed too high to be effective; but our column wavered and fell back behind the breastworks. A soldier raised me up; I turned the command over to Captain Daniel Munn and told him to keep the enemy in check, and that I would bandage my wound and soon return. Before I could reach the hospital I was made to realize that I was incapacitated from joining my men again. In the hospital I found General Whiting suffering uncomplainingly from his two wounds. He told me that Bragg had ignored his presence in the fort and had not noticed his messages. I perceived that the fire of my men had slackened, and sent my acting adjutant, John N. Kelly, for Major
Newton Martin Curtis (search for this): chapter 14.96
he faltering Federals. Suddenly the bombardment, which had been confined to the sea-face, turned again on our land-front, and with deadly precision; the iron-clads and heavy frigates drove in our Napoleons and exploded shells in the interior of the sally-port, which had heretofore escaped. They also swept the gun-chamber occupied by Confederates in front of those occupied by the enemy, and their shells rolled down within the works and exploded in most unexpected quarters, Brevet Major-General Newton M. Curtis. From a photograph. preventing even company formation. They drove from the front of the enemy all assailants except those so near that to have fired on them would have been to slaughter the Federals. We had now to contend with a column advancing around the rear of the left bastion into the interior plane of the fort. It moved slowly and cautiously, apparently in column of companies and in close order. I met it with an effective infantry fire, my men using the remains
Godfrey Weitzel (search for this): chapter 14.96
t was after a careful reconnoissance on December 25th, 1864, having drawn our fire by an advance of his skirmish-line to within 75 yards of the fort, that General Godfrey Weitzel, finding the works substantially uninjured by the explosion of the powder-ship [see p. 655] and the two days terrific bombardment of Porter's great armadaally engaged, and that the remainder of Hoke's division had come the night before to Wilmington, and were then on the march, if they had not already arrived. General Weitzel reported to me that to assault the work, in his judgment, and in that of the experienced officers of his command who had been on the skirmish-line, with any piticism he had himself to blame. On the evening of the 25th, before waiting for official reports, he listened to camp gossip and wrote to Admiral Porter: General Weitzel advanced his skirmish-line within fifty yards of the fort, while the garrison was kept in their bomb-proofs by the fire of the navy, and so closely that three
Benjamin North (search for this): chapter 14.96
rds of the fort, while the garrison was kept in their bomb-proofs by the fire of the navy, and so closely that three or four men of the picket-line ventured upon the parapet and through the sally-port of the work, capturing a horse, which they brought off, killing the orderly, who was the bearer of a dispatch from the chief of artillery of General Whiting, to bring a light battery within the fort, and also brought away from the parapet the flag of the fort. This piece of romance was sent North, and has gotten a lodgment in current history, and is actually repeated by General Grant in his Memoirs, though General Butler corrected the error in his official report of January 3d, 1865. No Federal soldier entered Fort Fisher Christmas day, except as a prisoner. The courier was sent out of the fort without my knowledge, and was killed and his horse captured within the enemy's lines. The flag captured was a small company flag, placed on the extreme left of the work, and which was carri
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 14.96
his bridge was a Napoleon gun. There were three mortars in rear of the land-face. It was after a careful reconnoissance on December 25th, 1864, having drawn our fire by an advance of his skirmish-line to within 75 yards of the fort, that General Godfrey Weitzel, finding the works substantially uninjured by the explosion of the powder-ship [see p. 655] and the two days terrific bombardment of Porter's great armada, reported to Butler that the fort could not be carried by assault. General B. F. Butler in his report of the operations of his troops, says in part: Brevet Brigadier-General [N. M.] Curtis, who deserves well for his gallantry and conduct, immediately pushed up his brigade within a few hundred yards of Fort Fisher, capturing the Half-moon battery and its men, who were taken off by the boats of the navy. In the meantime tile remainder of Ames's division had captured 218 men and 10 commissioned officers of the North Carolina reserves and other prisoners. From them I l
George L. Porter (search for this): chapter 14.96
the beach in front of us in very heavy force, not more than seven hundred yards from us. Nearly all land guns disabled. Attack! Attack! It is all I can say and all you can do. The original, in Whiting's handwriting, is in possession of Dr. Geo. L. Porter, Bridgeport, Conn.--W. L. The bombardment of Fort Fisher, as seen from the mound Battery. From a War-time sketch. I then passed hurriedly down in rear of the land-face and through the galleries, and although the fire of the fleet wnt of the L, and consisted of two thousand sailors and marines, Secretary Welles, in his report of the Navy Department, December 4th, 1865, says: Fourteen hundred sailors and marines were landed and participated in the direct assault ; but Admiral Porter in his report, dated off Fort Fisher, January 17th, 1865, says: I detailed 1600 sailors and 400 marines to accompany the troops in the assault — the sailors to board the sea-face, while the troops assaulted the land side.--editors. the greate
William W. Kirkland (search for this): chapter 14.96
s report of the operations of his troops, says in part: Brevet Brigadier-General [N. M.] Curtis, who deserves well for his gallantry and conduct, immediately pushed up his brigade within a few hundred yards of Fort Fisher, capturing the Half-moon battery and its men, who were taken off by the boats of the navy. In the meantime tile remainder of Ames's division had captured 218 men and 10 commissioned officers of the North Carolina reserves and other prisoners. From them I learned that Kirkland's and Hagood's brigades of Hoke's division had left the front of tile Army of the James, near Richmond, and were then within two miles of the rear of my forces, and their skirmishers were then actually engaged, and that the remainder of Hoke's division had come the night before to Wilmington, and were then on the march, if they had not already arrived. General Weitzel reported to me that to assault the work, in his judgment, and in that of the experienced officers of his command who had be
Arthur Muldoon (search for this): chapter 14.96
were out of breath and more or less disorganized and demoralized by the ordeal through which, by Bragg's neglect, they had been forced to pass. I sent them to an old commissary bomb-proof to recover breath. My headquarters during the fight were the pulpit battery on the sea-face, one hundred yards from the north-east salient and adjoining the hospital bomb-proof, commanding the best view of the approaches to the land-face. At half-past 2, as I was returning from another battery, Private Arthur Muldoon, one of my lookouts, called to me, Colonel, the enemy are about to charge. I informed General Whiting, who was near, and at my request he immediately telegraphed General Bragg, at Sugar Loaf : The enemy are about to assault; they outnumber us heavily. We are just manning our parapets. Fleet have extended down the sea-front outside and are firing very heavily. Enemy on the beach in front of us in very heavy force, not more than seven hundred yards from us. Nearly all land guns
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