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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
arolina,--at least 100 of whom were not fit for duty. Sunrise the next morning revealed to us the most formidable armada the world had ever known, supplemented by transports carrying about 8500 troops. Suddenly that long line of floating fortresses rained shot and shell, upon fort and beach and wooded hills, causing the very earth and sea to tremble. I had telegraphed for reenforcements, and during the day and night following about 700 arrived,--companies of light and heavy artillery, North Carolina troops, and some 50 sailors and marines of the Confederate States navy,--giving me 1500, all told, up to the morning of January 15th, including the sick and slightly wounded. On Friday, the 13th, in the midst of the bombardment, General W. H. C. Whiting, the district commander, and his staff, arrived in the fort. They had walked up from Battery Buchanan. I did not know of their approach until the general came to me on the works and remarked, Lamb, my boy, I have come to share your fat
river (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
work, the 150-pounder Armstrong, there were but 13 shells, and we had no other ammunition that could be used in it. The frigates Minnesota and Wabash each had an armament superior to ours, and these two vessels alone fired more shot and. shell at the works in the last attack than we had, all told or on hand, in both engagements. During the time between the two expeditions we had begged for more ammunition, but Interior view of the three traverses of the North-West salient, adjoining the River road. [see map, P. 645.] from a photograph. none came except a few useless bolts designed for the Armstrong gun. In the former fight we had fired 1272 shot and shell; leaving about 2328, exclusive of grape and shrapnel, to resist a passage of the ships and an assault by land. I was obliged to husband my ammunition even more than in the previous battle, and therefore gave the same orders that each gun should be fired only once every half-hour until disabled or destroyed, except when specia
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
e great victory was not fully realized by the American people. The position commanded the last gateway between the Confederate States and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all thmmanding the inlet, its two 11-inch guns covering the approach by land. It was garrisoned by a detachment from the Confederate States navy. An advanced redoubt with a 24-pounder was added after the attack by the forces under General Butler and Admi700 arrived,--companies of light and heavy artillery, North Carolina troops, and some 50 sailors and marines of the Confederate States navy,--giving me 1500, all told, up to the morning of January 15th, including the sick and slightly wounded. On Frt it was able to reduce it in spite of all I could do. . . . editors. One thousand tons of iron were gathered by the United States from the works. Had there been no fleet to assist the army at Fort Fisher the Federal infantry could not have dare
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 14.96
that the great victory was not fully realized by the American people. The position commanded the last gateway between the Confederate States and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually ended all blockade-running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held, or he could not subsist his army. The indentation of the Atlantic Ocean in the Carolina coast known as Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Federal Point, which, during the civil war, was called Confederate Point. Not quite seven miles north of the end of this peninsula stood a high sand-hill called the Sugar Loaf. Here there was an intrenched camp for the Army of Wilmington, under General Braxton Bragg, the department commander, that was hid from the sea by forest and sand-hills. From this intrenche
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
udgment, and in that of the experienced officers of his command who had been on the skirmish-line, with any prospect of success, was impossible. This opinion coincided with my own, and mulch as I regretted the necessity of abandoning the attempt, yet the path of duty was plain. Not so strong a work as Fort Fisher had been taken by assault during the war, and I had to guide me the experience of Port Hudson, with its slaughtered thousands in the repulsed assault, and the double assault of Fort Wagner, where thousands were sacrificed in an attempt to take a work less strong than Fisher, after it had been subjected to a more continued and fully as severe fire. And in neither of the instances I have mentioned had the assaulting force in its rear, as I had, an army of the enemy larger than itself. I therefore ordered that no assault should be made, and that the troops should reembark. editors. In the works on that afternoon were Map of the naval and Military attacks on Fort Fisher,
Smithfield, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
which was now in the enemy's lines. I had a gun fired toward her to warn her off, but on she came, unconscious of her danger, and she fell an easy captive in the enemy's hands. Shortly after, the Confederate steamer Chickamauga, which had been annoying the enemy from the river, fired into and sank the stupid craft. This incident gave me the first intimation that we were deserted. From the conformation of the Cape Fear River, General Bragg could have passed safely from Sugar Loaf toward Smithfield, and with a glass could have seen every-thing on the beach and in the fort, and in person or through an aide, with the steamers at his command, could have detected every movement of the enemy; but now, thirty-six hours after the fight had commenced, several hours after Craig's Landing had been in the possession of the enemy, he Lieutenant Wiley H. Williford, C. S. A. From a photograph. sent into the enemy's lines a steamer full of sorely needed stores, which at night could have gone to
Federal Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
es and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually ended all blockade-running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held, or he could not subsist his army. The indentation of the Atlantic Ocean in the Carolina coast known as Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Federal Point, which, during the civil war, was called Confederate Point. Not quite seven miles north of the end of this peninsula stood a high sand-hill called the Sugar Loaf. Here there was an intrenched camp for the Army of Wilmington, under General Braxton Bragg, the department commander, that was hid from the sea by forest and sand-hills. From this intrenched camp the river bank, with a neighboring ridge of sand-dunes, formed a covered way for troops to within a hundred yards of the left salie
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
hey had not already arrived. General Weitzel reported to me that to assault the work, in his judgment, and in that of the experienced officers of his command who had been on the skirmish-line, with any prospect of success, was impossible. This opinion coincided with my own, and mulch as I regretted the necessity of abandoning the attempt, yet the path of duty was plain. Not so strong a work as Fort Fisher had been taken by assault during the war, and I had to guide me the experience of Port Hudson, with its slaughtered thousands in the repulsed assault, and the double assault of Fort Wagner, where thousands were sacrificed in an attempt to take a work less strong than Fisher, after it had been subjected to a more continued and fully as severe fire. And in neither of the instances I have mentioned had the assaulting force in its rear, as I had, an army of the enemy larger than itself. I therefore ordered that no assault should be made, and that the troops should reembark. editors
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
st gateway between the Confederate States and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually ended all blockade-running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held, or he could not subsist his army. The indentation of the Atlantic Ocean in the Carolina coast known as Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Federal Point, which, during the civil war, was called Confederate Point. Not quite seven miles north of the end of this peninsula ste enemy from the river, fired into and sank the stupid craft. This incident gave me the first intimation that we were deserted. From the conformation of the Cape Fear River, General Bragg could have passed safely from Sugar Loaf toward Smithfield, and with a glass could have seen every-thing on the beach and in the fort, and in p
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
sulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually endas Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Federal Point, which, duringemainder of Hoke's division had come the night before to Wilmington, and were then on the march, if they had not already arris seen the North-east salient, overlooking the sea. of Wilmington, and there had a grand review. The fort was not even adarrival was reported from Fort Fisher to headquarters il Wilmington. The night of the 12th of January, from the ramparts whip the enemy again. He then told me that when he left Wilmington General Bragg was hastily removing his stores and ammunieneral Bragg was charged with the command and defense of Wilmington, by the Secretary of War, on January 13th; and General W letter from General Braxton Bragg to his brother, dated Wilmington, five days after the fall of Fort Fisher (first publishe
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