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Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
amb, Colonel, C. S. A. The capture of Fort Fisher, N. C., on the 15th of January, 1865, was folloched camp, cooperating with the garrison of Fort Fisher, to have rendered the Point untenable for a the sea-face. When I assumed command of Fort Fisher, July 4th, 1862, it was composed of several Map of the naval and Military attacks on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, showing direction of firable impediment.--W. L. The garrison of Fort Fisher was composed altogether of North Carolinian the day; and its arrival was reported from Fort Fisher to headquarters il Wilmington. The night In a report to General Lee, dictated at Fort Fisher January 18th, 1865, and in another inclosinelegraphic and signal communication between Fort Fisher and Sugar Loaf, Bragg's headquarters, and Idgeport, Conn.--W. L. The bombardment of Fort Fisher, as seen from the mound Battery. From a Wated Wilmington, five days after the fall of Fort Fisher (first published in 1881); also an article [19 more...]
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
ve been the glory of victory. As our shouts of triumph went up I turned to look at the western salient, and saw, to my astonishment, three Federal battle-flags upon our ramparts. General Whiting saw them at the same moment, and, calling on the men to pull down those flags and drive the enemy from the work, rushed toward them on the parapet. Among those who followed Whiting, and who gave his young life upon those ramparts, I must mention the brave Lieutenant Williford, who commanded the Blakely battery. In order to make a careful reconnoissance of the position of the enemy, I passed through the sally-port, and outside of the work witnessed a savage hand-to-hand conflict for the possession of the fourth gun-chamber from the left bastion. My men, led by Whiting, had driven the standard-bearer from the top of the traverse and the enemy from the parapet in front. They had recovered the gun-chamber with great slaughter, and on the parapet and on the long traverse of the next gun-c
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
destroyed by the bombardment and by explosion, little or nothing was done to repair damages or strengthen the armament of the work. Requisitions were made for additional ammunition, especially for hand-grenades, to repel assault, but it was impossible to obtain what was needed. Application was made for the placing of marine torpedoes where the iron-clads had anchored, and whither they returned, but no notice was taken of it. Although we heard on January 8th that the fleet had returned to Beaufort, and we knew that Fort Fisher was still its objective point, General Braxton Bragg [see note, Vol. III., p. 711] withdrew the supporting army from Sugar Loaf and marched it to a camp sixteen miles distant, north View of the land front from the Second traverse of the North-West salient. From a photograph taken after the capture: the indentation of the palisades in the middle-ground marks the position of the sally-port. Beyond is seen the North-east salient, overlooking the sea. of Wil
Bridgeport (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
ly telegraphed General Bragg, at Sugar Loaf : The enemy are about to assault; they outnumber us heavily. We are just manning our parapets. Fleet have extended down the sea-front outside and are firing very heavily. Enemy on the beach in front of us in very heavy force, not more than seven hundred yards from us. Nearly all land guns disabled. Attack! Attack! It is all I can say and all you can do. The original, in Whiting's handwriting, is in possession of Dr. Geo. L. Porter, Bridgeport, Conn.--W. L. The bombardment of Fort Fisher, as seen from the mound Battery. From a War-time sketch. I then passed hurriedly down in rear of the land-face and through the galleries, and although the fire of the fleet was terrific, I knew it must soon cease, and I ordered additional sharp-shooters to the gun-chambers with instructions to pick off the officers in the assaulting columns, and directed the battery commanders to form their detachments and rush to the top of the parapets w
Onslow Bay (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.96
d by the American people. The position commanded the last gateway between the Confederate States and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually ended all blockade-running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held, or he could not subsist his army. The indentation of the Atlantic Ocean in the Carolina coast known as Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Federal Point, which, during the civil war, was called Confederate Point. Not quite seven miles north of the end of this peninsula stood a high sand-hill called the Sugar Loaf. Here there was an intrenched camp for the Army of Wilmington, under General Braxton Bragg, the department commander, that was hid from the sea by forest and sand-hills. From this intrenched camp the river bank, with a neighboring ri
William Lamb (search for this): chapter 14.96
The defense of Fort Fisher. by its commander, William Lamb, Colonel, C. S. A. The capture of Fort Fisher, N. C., on the 15th of January, 1865, was followed so quickly by the final dissolution of ehind the New Ironsides) had no fixed position. Plan and sections of Fort Fisher. Colonel William Lamb, C. S. A. From a photograph. over 900 veteran troops and 450 junior reserves, reeinforcechanan. I did not know of their approach until the general came to me on the works and remarked, Lamb, my boy, I have come to share your fate. You and your garrison are to be sacrificed. I replied,he fort; that Bragg must soon come to the rescue, and it would save us. General Whiting remarked, Lamb, when you die I will assume command, and I will not surrender the fort. In less than an hour a fington, five days after the fall of Fort Fisher (first published in 1881); also an article by Colonel Lamb, controverting most of General Bragg's statements. General Bragg says (more emphatically but
A. Judson Clark (search for this): chapter 14.96
saw also a fresh force pouring into the left of the work, now offering no resistance. I doubt if ever before the commander of a work went outside of it and looked back upon the conflict for its possession; but from the peculiar construction of the works it was necessary to do so in order to see the exact position of affairs. I was in front of the sally-port and concealed from the army by a fragment of the palisade. I was told, several years after the war, by a United States marine named Clark, that I was distinctly seen and recognized by a comrade and himself who had feigned death in front of the north-east salient, and that his comrade rose from his place of concealment to shoot me, but before he could fire was shot in the head by a soldier in the fort. I never thought of danger from that direction.--W. L. 1. the mound Battery from the Fort side. 2. the sea-face of the Sixth to the Eleventh traverses. 3. Battery Buchanan. From Photographs. Ordering Captain Z. T. Adams
Isaac B. Fisher (search for this): chapter 14.96
mish-line, with any prospect of success, was impossible. This opinion coincided with my own, and mulch as I regretted the necessity of abandoning the attempt, yet the path of duty was plain. Not so strong a work as Fort Fisher had been taken by assault during the war, and I had to guide me the experience of Port Hudson, with its slaughtered thousands in the repulsed assault, and the double assault of Fort Wagner, where thousands were sacrificed in an attempt to take a work less strong than Fisher, after it had been subjected to a more continued and fully as severe fire. And in neither of the instances I have mentioned had the assaulting force in its rear, as I had, an army of the enemy larger than itself. I therefore ordered that no assault should be made, and that the troops should reembark. editors. In the works on that afternoon were Map of the naval and Military attacks on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, showing direction of fire of Union vessels: note.--the flag-ship Malver
hot was left, and nobly did he keep his promise. I again sent a message to Bragg begging him to come to the rescue. Shortly after my fall the Federals made an advance, and, capturing several more of the gun-chambers, reached the sally-port. The column in the work advanced, but Major Reilly, rallying the men, among them. the South Carolinians, who had all become engaged, drove them back. About 8 o'clock at night my aide came to me and said the ammunition was giving out; that he and Chaplain McKinnon had gathered all on the dead and wounded in a blanket and had distributed it; that the enemy had possession of nearly all of the land-face; that it was impossible to hold out much longer, and suggested that it would be wise to surrender, as a further struggle might be a useless sacrifice of life. I replied that so long as I lived I would not surrender the fort; that Bragg must soon come to the rescue, and it would save us. General Whiting remarked, Lamb, when you die I will assume com
ates and the outside world. [See outline map, p. 629; also map, p. 694.] Its capture, with the resulting loss of all the Cape Fear River defenses, and of Wilmington, the great importing depot of the South, effectually ended all blockade-running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held, or he could not subsist his army. The indentation of the Atlantic Ocean in the Carolina coast known as Onslow Bay and the Cape Fear River running south from Wilmington form the peninsula known as Fedeplied, Don't say so, General; we shall certainly whip the enemy again. He then told me that when he left Wilmington General Bragg was hastily removing his stores and ammunition, and was looking for a place to fall back upon. In a report to General Lee, dictated at Fort Fisher January 18th, 1865, and in another inclosing the first one) dated Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, February 19th, 1865, General Whiting blames General Bragg for the loss of Fort Fisher, and asks that the latter's conduc
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