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Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
ddey's occupied Montevallo, on the Alabama and Tennessee River railroad, nearly the same distance to the south-east. By starting on diverging roads the enemy was left in doubt as to our real object, and compelled to watch equally Columbus, Tuscaloosa, and Selma. The command moved southward in three columns [see map, p. 414], General Emory Upton's division by Barton's Station, Russellville, and Mount Hope to Jasper, near the Black Warrior River; General Eli Long's, by Cherokee Station, Frankfort, and Thorn Hill to the same point; while General Edward M. McCook's, following Long's route as far as Bear Creek, continued southward to Eldridge, thence moving east to Jasper. From Jasper the whole command moved across the two forks of the Black Warrior and were directed on Montevallo via Elyton. At Elyton, on the evening of the 30th, I directed General McCook to detach Croxton's brigade, with orders to move on Tuscaloosa as rapidly as possible, burn the public stores, military school
Altamaha (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
the convention, as well as to make such a disposition of his forces, covering the country northward from Forsyth to Marietta, so as to secure the arrest of Jefferson Davis and party. I directed General Croxton, [then] commanding the First Division, to distribute it along the line of the Ocmulgee, connecting with the Fourth Division and extending southward to this place. Colonel Minty, commanding the Second Division, was directed to extend his troops along the line of the Ocmulgee and Altamaha rivers as far as Jacksonville. General McCook, with about five hundred men of his division, was sent to Tallahassee, Florida, with orders to receive the surrender of the rebels in that State and to watch the country to the north and eastward. In addition to this, troops from the First and Second divisions were directed to watch the Flint River crossings, and small parties were stationed at the principal railroad stations from Atlanta to Eufala, as well as at Columbus and West Point and Talla
Ocmulgee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
out the terms of the convention, as well as to make such a disposition of his forces, covering the country northward from Forsyth to Marietta, so as to secure the arrest of Jefferson Davis and party. I directed General Croxton, [then] commanding the First Division, to distribute it along the line of the Ocmulgee, connecting with the Fourth Division and extending southward to this place. Colonel Minty, commanding the Second Division, was directed to extend his troops along the line of the Ocmulgee and Altamaha rivers as far as Jacksonville. General McCook, with about five hundred men of his division, was sent to Tallahassee, Florida, with orders to receive the surrender of the rebels in that State and to watch the country to the north and eastward. In addition to this, troops from the First and Second divisions were directed to watch the Flint River crossings, and small parties were stationed at the principal railroad stations from Atlanta to Eufala, as well as at Columbus and West
Eufala (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
ng with the Fourth Division and extending southward to this place. Colonel Minty, commanding the Second Division, was directed to extend his troops along the line of the Ocmulgee and Altamaha rivers as far as Jacksonville. General McCook, with about five hundred men of his division, was sent to Tallahassee, Florida, with orders to receive the surrender of the rebels in that State and to watch the country to the north and eastward. In addition to this, troops from the First and Second divisions were directed to watch the Flint River crossings, and small parties were stationed at the principal railroad stations from Atlanta to Eufala, as well as at Columbus and West Point and Talladega. By these means I confidently expected to arrest all large parties of fugitives and soldiers, and by a thorough system of scouts hoped to obtain timely information of the movements of important personages. For an account of the movements of Jefferson Davis and his cabinet, see notes pp. 763 and 766.
Trion (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
nt (this had also been obtained from prisoners); that Jackson with his division and all the wagons and artillery of the rebel cavalry, marching from Tuscaloosa via Trion toward Centreville, had encamped the night before at Hill's plantation, three miles beyond Scottsboro‘; that Croxton [Union], with the brigade detached at Elyton, had struck Jackson's rear-guard at Trion and interposed himself between it and the train; that Jackson had discovered this, and intended to attack Croxton at daylight of April 1st. I learned from the other dispatch that Chalmers had also arrived at Marion, Alabama, and had been ordered to cross to the east side of the Cahawba nearraggling from foraging parties and not in line of duty. His operations since his separation from the main column, at Elyton, March 30th, covered a skirmish at Trion, Alabama, April 2d; the capture of Tuscaloosa, April 5th, and the destruction of the Military School, together with military stores and public works, at that place. F
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
Wilson's raid through Alabama and Georgia. see General James H. Wilson's article, the Union cavalry in the Hood campaign, p. 465.--editors. In the spring of 1865 the cavalry corps commanded by General James H. Wilson was encamped at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, Alabama [see map, p. 414], on the north bank of the Tennessee, with a base of supplies at Eastport, Mississippi. The following condensation of General Wilson's report of June 29th, 1865, summarizes the final operations of his On the 8th and 9th the entire cavalry corps, excepting Croxton's brigade, crossed the Alabama, and General Wilson, believing that he had rendered Selma valueless by his thorough destruction of railroads and supplies, determined to march into Georgia by way of Montgomery. The mayor of Montgomery surrendered the city to Wilson's advance guard on the 12th of April. After destroying large quantities of stores, small-arms, and cotton, the command moved on the 14th, Upton in advance and strikin
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
y, 1865] General Thomas arrived at Eastport with instructions directing me to fit out an expedition of five or six thousand cavalry for the purpose of making a demonstration upon Tuscaloosa and Selma in favor of General Canby's operations against Mobile and Central Alabama. [See p. 411.] . . . The instructions of Lieutenant-General Grant, transmitted to me by General Thomas, allowed me the amplest discretion as an independent commander. The movement was delayed nearly three weeks by heavy r of Tuscaloosa, two days before. Thus assured of Croxton's success and safety, I determined to lose no further time in crossing to the south side of the Alabama. I had also satisfied myself in the meantime that Canby had an ample force to take Mobile and march to central Alabama. On the 8th and 9th the entire cavalry corps, excepting Croxton's brigade, crossed the Alabama, and General Wilson, believing that he had rendered Selma valueless by his thorough destruction of railroads and suppl
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
Wilson's raid through Alabama and Georgia. see General James H. Wilson's article, the Union cavalry in the Hood campaign, p. 465.--editors. In the spring of 1865 the cavalry corps commanded by General James H. Wilson was encamped at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, Alabama [see map, p. 414], on the north bank of the Tennessee, with a base of supplies at Eastport, Mississippi. The following condensation of General Wilson's report of June 29th, 1865, summarizes the final operations of his corps: On the 23d of February, 1865] General Thomas arrived at Eastport with instructions directing me to fit out an expedition of five or six thousand cavalry for the purpose of making a demonstration upon Tuscaloosa and Selma in favor of General Canby's operations against Mobile and Central Alabama. [See p. 411.] . . . The instructions of Lieutenant-General Grant, transmitted to me by General Thomas, allowed me the amplest discretion as an independent commander. The movement was delay
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
necessary to scatter the troops over a wide extent of country, and march as rapidly as circumstances would permit. This was rendered safe by the fact that Forrest's forces were at that time near West Point, Mississippi, 150 miles south-west of Eastport, while Roddey's occupied Montevallo, on the Alabama and Tennessee River railroad, nearly the same distance to the south-east. By starting on diverging roads the enemy was left in doubt as to our real object, and compelled to watch equally Columbus, Tuscaloosa, and Selma. The command moved southward in three columns [see map, p. 414], General Emory Upton's division by Barton's Station, Russellville, and Mount Hope to Jasper, near the Black Warrior River; General Eli Long's, by Cherokee Station, Frankfort, and Thorn Hill to the same point; while General Edward M. McCook's, following Long's route as far as Bear Creek, continued southward to Eldridge, thence moving east to Jasper. From Jasper the whole command moved across the two f
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 18.114
of making a demonstration upon Tuscaloosa and Selma in favor of General Canby's operations againstled to watch equally Columbus, Tuscaloosa, and Selma. The command moved southward in three colue road, and rejoin it at or in the vicinity of Selma. Besides covering our trains and inflicting aoining Forrest in my front, or in the works at Selma. I also learned that a force of dismounted meless than an hour, the enemy retreating toward Selma. The whole corps bivouacked at sundown about Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma. With almost constant fighting the enemy had been drivech and complete description of the defenses of Selma, I directed General Long, marching by the flan General Upton's division was dispatched from Selma, on April 3d, to open communications with McCo had returned east of the Cahawba. He reached Selma in company with Upton on the 6th. Nothing wasGeneral Wilson, believing that he had rendered Selma valueless by his thorough destruction of railr[2 more...]
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