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Hanovertown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
The landing was covered by Captain Babcock of the U. S. Navy, in command of an old New York ferry-boat on which were mounted some bow and stern guns. The whirligig of time had brought me back to the Army of the Potomac, and that army to its campaigning grounds of 1862, it having in the interim traced a path resembling that reputed to have been made by the Israelites in the wilderness. During the night of the 30th and the morning of the 31st I received three copies of an order dated Hanovertown, 1 p. M., May 28th, and signed by General Rawlins, chief-of-staff, directing me to leave a garrison at White House and move with the remainder of tile command to New Castle, on the south side of the Pamunkey River. As none of the wagons or reserve ammunition had as yet arrived, and as some of the troops were still behind, I at once sent a confidential aide (Major P. C. F. West) to ask if the necessities were such as to make it incumbent on me to move as I then stood with reference to men
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
nd ready for removal by water to a point opposite White House on the Pamunkey, there to protect a corps of bridtion in going up the Pamunkey and in getting into White House. The torpedoes on the water or a well-arranged snkey, I determined to land the troops directly at White House, and the debarkation began there on the morning oief-of-staff, directing me to leave a garrison at White House and move with the remainder of tile command to Ne. Leaving General Adelbert Ames with 2500 men at White House, I marched at 3:30 P. m. with about 10,000 infantneral Meade to inform him that, having moved from White House before the arrival of transportation or supplies,having been relieved by other troops from duty at White House.--W. F. S. There was very little straggling dcorps being near Bethesda Church. On that day at White House, fifteen miles to the left, the Eighteenth Army Csame distance to, move. The Eighteenth Corps, at White House, about thirteen miles from Cold Harbor, moved on
Shady Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
f the fact that any movement of the enemy toward you cannot fail to be noticed and followed up from here, will make your advance secure. The position of the Army of the Potomac this evening is as follows: The left of the Fifth Corps is on the Shady Grove road, extending to the Mechanicsville-road and about three miles south of the Totopotomoy. The Ninth Corps is to the right of the Fifth; then. comes the Second and Sixth, forming a line being on the road from Hanover Court-House to Cold Harbrmation of the lines of battle. A hasty reconnoissance of the ground showed that the enemy were posted in a wood in front, which was to be reached by crossing a wide open field. On the right two broad roads, leading from Mechanicsville and Shady Grove, united on an open plain which dominated the ground over which the attack was to be made. That point required a division to hold it, leaving only two divisions, numbering about six thousand men, for the assault. While preparations were being
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
ey and in getting into White House. The torpedoes on the water or a well-arranged surprise on land would bring your expedition to grief, as you will not have the advantage in going away which we had coming. Your destination will be exactly known by the rebels the moment you start. Indeed, they have already predicted it in their newspapers. . . . Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. In half an hour after the receipt of this order my troops were moving to Bermuda Hundred and City Point for embarkation. Learning at Fort Monroe by a telegram on the 29th that the Army of the Potomac had crossed the Pamunkey, I determined to land the troops directly at White House, and the debarkation began there on the morning of the 30th and proceeded as rapidly as the limited wharf facilities would admit. The landing was covered by Captain Babcock of the U. S. Navy, in command of an old New York ferry-boat on which were mounted some bow and stern guns. The whirligig of time had bro
New Castle, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
directing me to leave a garrison at White House and move with the remainder of tile command to New Castle, on the south side of the Pamunkey River. As none of the wagons or reserve ammunition had as tation for the supplies. Fearing that there might be some urgent reason for the appearance at New Castle of such a force as I could gather, and in such condition as I could move it, I decided not to eneral: Triplicated orders have been sent to you to march up the south bank of the Pamunkey to New Castle, there to await further orders. I send with this a brigade of cavalry to accompany you on thelock that night the command encamped at Bassett's, near Old Church, and about three miles from New Castle. The troops were not inured to long marches and suffered greatly from the heat. From Bassett, at White House, about thirteen miles from Cold Harbor, moved on the 31st, at 3:30 P. M., for New Castle, fifteen miles up the Pamunkey, and thence, on the 1st of June, about twelve miles to Cold Har
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
is attack without reference to your advance, and the commanding general directs that your assault be continued without reference to General Wright's. General Wright has, but a very short time before the receipt of your communication through Major West, reported that he was waiting your advance to enable him to assault. My right was held by General Devens, and his troops could not be spared for an assault. Of General Martindale's two brigades, Stannard's had been thoroughly used up, and Stedman, in addition to having been repulsed, was holding the line between Martindale and Devens, and also endeavoring to keep down the cross-fire from the right. Two of Brooks's brigades had suffered severely in the first advance and through holding their position under the terrible cross-fire. This left but one brigade of fresh troops, under General Burnham. I had had but about ten thousand men with me on the 1st of June, on my arrival, and had already lost heavily in killed and wounded. On
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
be some urgent reason for the appearance at New Castle of such a force as I could gather, and in such condition as I could move it, I decided not to await an answer to my letter but to move at once. Leaving General Adelbert Ames with 2500 men at White House, I marched at 3:30 P. m. with about 10,000 infantry and artillery, but without wagons to carry supplies or ammunition. During the march I received the following autograph letter from General Grant: headquarters, armies of the United States, near Hawes's Shop, Va., May 30th, 1864, 7:30 P. M. Major-General W. F. Smith, Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps. General: Triplicated orders have been sent to you to march up the south bank of the Pamunkey to New Castle, there to await further orders. I send with this a brigade of cavalry to accompany you on the march. As yet no further directions can be given you than is contained in your orders. The movements of the enemy this evening on our left, down the Mechanicsville roa
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
l Rawlins, chief-of-staff, directing me to leave a garrison at White House and move with the remainder of tile command to New Castle, on the south side of the Pamunkey River. As none of the wagons or reserve ammunition had as yet arrived, and as some of the troops were still behind, I at once sent a confidential aide (Major P. C.7:30 P. M. Major-General W. F. Smith, Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps. General: Triplicated orders have been sent to you to march up the south bank of the Pamunkey to New Castle, there to await further orders. I send with this a brigade of cavalry to accompany you on the march. As yet no further directions can be given ve been some mistake in my order, and asking that it be rectified. Uncertain as to the position of the enemy, I began the construction of a bridge across the Pamunkey River, and while so engaged a staff-officer arrived front General Grant to say that there had been a mistake in my order, and that it should have read Cold Harbor i
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. by William Farrar Smith, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. On the 27th of May an order came from Washington to me near Bermuda Hundred to concentrate sixteen thousand men under my command ready for removal by water to a point opposite White House on the Pamunkey, there to protect a corps of bridge-builders. On the 28th I received the following order: Headquarters, in the field, May 28th, 1864. Major-General Smith, Commanding Eighteenth Corps: exactly known by the rebels the moment you start. Indeed, they have already predicted it in their newspapers. . . . Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. In half an hour after the receipt of this order my troops were moving to Bermuda Hundred and City Point for embarkation. Learning at Fort Monroe by a telegram on the 29th that the Army of the Potomac had crossed the Pamunkey, I determined to land the troops directly at White House, and the debarkation began there on the morni
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
on that left four exposed flanks The wide gap between the Eighteenth and the Fifth corps made two additional flanks.--W. F. S. in close proximity to the enemy, caused a delay of many hours in the attack of the 1st of June, made that attack fruitless in results, and gave to us the murderous order of parallel advance to battle of June 3d. In conclusion, let us review the logistics of Cold Harbor. On the 30th of May, the line held by the Army of the Potomac ran along the road from Hanover Court House to Cold Harbor, beginning at a point about six miles south of the Court House, where the right of the Sixth Corps rested. To the left came the Second, Ninth, and Fifth corps in the order named, the left of the latter corps being near Bethesda Church. On that day at White House, fifteen miles to the left, the Eighteenth Army Corps was debarking. On the 31st Sheridan, with two divisions of cavalry, had engaged and driven the enemy from their rifle-pits at Cold Harbor. The force he e
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