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Sumner H. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 5.35
He reached the capital on the 7th, had an interview for the first time with Mr. Lincoln, and on the 9th received his commission at the hands of the President, who mhe science of war of which I had knowledge; and, better still, I had pleased Mr. Lincoln, who wanted success very much. But I had not accomplished all, for Hood's a to Raleigh, became vastly important, if not actually conclusive of the war. Mr. Lincoln was the wisest man of our day, and more truly and kindly gave voice to my seourself to decide. So highly do I prize this testimonial that I preserve Mr. Lincoln's letter, every word in his own handwriting, unto this day; and if I know myould have been adjudged ungenerous and unmilitary in me; but the result, and Mr. Lincoln's judgment after the event, demonstrated that my division of force was liberory and peace from Virginia to Texas. He was one of the many referred to by Mr. Lincoln who sat in darkness, but after the event saw a great light. He never reveal
James B. McPherson (search for this): chapter 5.35
dian expedition. On February 3d, 1864, General Sherman started from Vicksburg with two columns of infantry under Generals McPherson and Hurlbut, and marched to Meridian, Mississippi, to break up the Mobile and Ohio and the Jackson and Selma railrocontinued until June 27th, when I ordered a general assault, with the full cooperation of my great lieutenants, Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, as good and true men as ever lived or died for their country's cause; but we failed, losing 3000 men, tto us to be a fighter, a graduate of West Point of the class of 1853, No. 44, of which class two of my army commanders, McPherson and Schofield, were No. 1 and No. 7. The character of a leader is a large factor in the game of war, and I confess I w fell back within the intrenchments of Atlanta. Their losses are reported 8499 to ours of 3641; but among our dead was McPherson, the commander of the Army of the Tennessee. While this battle was in progress, Schofield at the center and Thomas on
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 5.35
he armies of the United States, and give his personal supervision to the Army of the Potomac. On the 10th he visited General Meade at Brandy Station, and saw many of his leading officers, but he returned to Washington the next day and went on to Naame the season for action, and by the 4th all his armies were in motion. The army of Butler at Fort Monroe was his left, Meade's army the center, and mine at Chattanooga his right. Butler was to move against Richmond on the south of James River, MMeade straight against Lee, intrenched behind the Rapidan, and I to attack Joe Johnston and push him to and beyond Atlanta. This was as far as human foresight could penetrate. Though Meade commanded the Army of the Potomac, Grant virtually controllMeade commanded the Army of the Potomac, Grant virtually controlled it, and on the 4th of May, 1864, he crossed the Rapidan, and at noon of the 5th attacked Lee. He knew that a certain amount of fighting, killing, had to be done to accomplish his end, and also to pay the penalty of former failures. In the wilder
nty-five miles south-west of Atlanta, on the Montgomery and Selma railroad, where he began systematic preparations for an aggressive campaign against our communications to compel us to abandon our conquests. Here he was visited by Mr. Davis, who promised all possible cooperation and assistance in the proposed campaign; and here also Mr. Davis made his famous speech, which was duly reported to me in Atlanta, assuring his army that they would make my retreat more disastrous than was that of Napoleon from Moscow. Forewarned, I took immediate measures to thwart his plans. One division was sent back to Rome, another to Chattanooga; the guards along our railroad were reenforced and warned of the coming blow. General Thomas was sent back to the headquarters of his department at Nashville, Schofield to his at Knoxville, while I remained in Atlanta to await Hood's initiative. This followed soon. Hood, sending his cavalry ahead, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Campbelltown with his mai
ury magazine for February, 1888, and from a letter by General Sherman to the editor, printed in that periodical for July, 1887. the figures in the text are from Phisterer's Statistical record. (Charles Scribner's Sons.) by William T. Sherman, General, U. S. A. On the 4th day of March, 1864, General U. S. Grant was summoned to W In the wilderness there was no room for grand strategy, or even minor tactics; but the fighting was desperate, the losses to the Union army being, according to Phisterer, 18,387, Later official compilation, 17, 666.--editors. to the Confederate loss of 11,400--the difference due to Lee's intrenchments and the blind nature of tth, during which time there was incessant fighting, because he was compelled to attack his enemy behind these improvised intrenchments. His losses, according to Phisterer, were 12,564, Later official compilation, 18,399.--editors. while the Confederates lost 9000. Nevertheless, his renewed order, Forward by the left flank, com
Benjamin H. Porter (search for this): chapter 5.35
e year 1864 the conflict at the West was concluded, leaving nothing to be considered in the grand game of war but Lee's army, held by Grant in Richmond, and the Confederate detachments at Mobile and along the sea-board north of Savannah. Of course Charleston, ever arrogant, felt secure; but it was regarded by us as a dead cock in the pit, and fell of itself when its inland communications were cut. In January Fort Fisher was captured by a detachment from the Army of the Potomac, aided by Admiral Porter's fleet, and Wilmington was occupied by Schofield, who had been brought by Grant from Nashville to Washington and sent down the Atlantic coast to prepare for Sherman's coming to Goldsboro‘, North Carolina,--all converging on Richmond. Preparatory to the next move, General Howard was sent from Savannah to secure Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, as a point of departure for the north, and General Slocum to Sister's Ferry, on the Savannah River, to secure a safe lodgment on the north bank f
John A. Rawlins (search for this): chapter 5.35
and as I learned subsequently, finding that he could not move me, he appealed to the authorities at Washington to stop it. I had been acquainted with General John A. Rawlins, General Grant's chief-of-staff, from the beginning of the war. He was always most loyal and devoted to his chief, an enthusiastic patriot, and of real abtances rather than of education or practice, yet of infinite use to his chief throughout the war and up to the hour of his death as Secretary of War, in 1869. General Rawlins was enthusiastically devoted to his friends in the Western army, with which he had been associated from Cairo to Vicksburg and Chattanooga, and doubtless, likf 65,000 of the best soldiers which America had ever produced, to remain idle when an opportunity was offered such as never occurs twice to any man on earth. General Rawlins was right according to the light he possessed, and I remember well my feeling of uneasiness that something of the kind might happen, and how free and glorious
John M. Schofield (search for this): chapter 5.35
my great lieutenants, Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, as good and true men as ever lived or died ass two of my army commanders, McPherson and Schofield, were No. 1 and No. 7. The character of a lnnessee. While this battle was in progress, Schofield at the center and Thomas on the right made er rapid and skillful, I detached by rail General Schofield and two of my six corps to Nashville, ale every preparation. Hood first encountered Schofield at Franklin, November 30th, 1864, attacked hime sketch. killed on the very parapets, to Schofield's loss of 2326. Nevertheless he pushed on trter's fleet, and Wilmington was occupied by Schofield, who had been brought by Grant from Nashvilllt and hostile country, making junction with Schofield at a safe base with two good railroads back n I reached Goldsboro‘, made junction. with Schofield, and moved forward to Raleigh, I was willingavannah to Goldsboro‘, or of the transfer of Schofield from Nashville to cooperate with me in North[1 more...]<
Charles Scribner (search for this): chapter 5.35
The Grand strategy of the last year of the War. re-arranged from the Grand strategy of the War of the rebellion, by General Sherman, printed in the century magazine for February, 1888, and from a letter by General Sherman to the editor, printed in that periodical for July, 1887. the figures in the text are from Phisterer's Statistical record. (Charles Scribner's Sons.) by William T. Sherman, General, U. S. A. On the 4th day of March, 1864, General U. S. Grant was summoned to Washington from Nashville to receive his commission of lieutenant-general, the highest rank then known in the United States, and the same that was conferred on Washington in 1798. He reached the capital on the 7th, had an interview for the first time with Mr. Lincoln, and on the 9th received his commission at the hands of the President, who made a short address, to which Grant made a suitable reply. He was informed that it was desirable that he should come east to command all the armies of the United Sta
Philip H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 5.35
suitable commander for this field of operations, and settled upon Major-General Philip H. Sheridan, whom he had brought from the West to command the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac. Sheridan promptly went to his new sphere of operations, quickly ascertained its strength and resources, and resolved to attack Early in t the 19th of October, at Cedar Creek, gaining a temporary advantage during General Sheridan's absence; but on his opportune return his army resumed the offensive, defd of operations, eliminating that army from the subsequent problem of the war. Sheridan's losses were 5995 to Early's 4200 ; but these losses are no just measure of te base of supplies and as an easy route for raids within the Union lines. General Sheridan then committed its protection to detachments, and with his main force rejoreasons, and waited for the inevitable. At last, on the 1st day of April, General Sheridan, by his vehement and most successful attack on the Confederate lines at th
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