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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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Bolton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. by Joseph E. Johnston, General, C. S. A. Buzzard-Roost Gap. From a War-time sketch. President Davis transferred me from the Department of Mississippi to the command of the Army of Tennessee by a telegram received December 18th, 1863, in the camp of Ross's brigade of cavalry near Bolton. I assumed that command at Dalton on the 27th, and received there, on the 1st of January, a letter from the President dated December 23d, purporting to be instructions. In it he, in Richmond, informed me of the encouraging condition of the army, which induced him to hope that I would soon be able to commence active operations against the enemy,--the men being tolerably well clothed, with a large reserve of small-arms, the morning reports exhibiting an effective total that exceeded in number that actually engaged on the Confederate side in any battle of the war. Yet this army itself had lost in the recent campaign at least 25,000 men in action, whil
Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
Atlanta. This brought the left of Hardee's corps to Gilgal Church, Polk's right near the Marietta and Ackworth road and Hood's corps massed beyond that road. Pine Mountain, a detached hill, was held by a division. On the 11th of June the left of the Federal army was on the high ground beyond Noonday Creek, its center a third of a mile in front of Pine Mountain and its right beyond the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road. In the morning of the 14th General Hardee and I rode to the summit of Pine Mountain to decide if the outpost there should be maintained. General Polk accompanied us. After we had concluded our examination and the abandonment of the hill tPine Mountain to decide if the outpost there should be maintained. General Polk accompanied us. After we had concluded our examination and the abandonment of the hill that night had been decided upon, a few shots were fired at us from a battery of Parrott guns a quarter of a mile in our front; the third of these passed through General Polk's chest, from left to right, killing him instantly. This event produced deep sorrow in the army, in every battle of which he had been distinguished. Major-Ge
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
irit of the army were much improved between the 1st of January and the end of April, and its numbers were increased. The efforts for the latter object brought back to the ranks about five thousand of the men who had left them in the rout of Missionary Ridge. On the morning report of April 30th the totals were: 37,652 infantry, 2812 artillery with 112 guns, and 2392 cavalry. This is the report as corrected by Major Kinloch Falconer, assistant adjutant-general, from official records in his offi into the interior of the enemy's country as far as he could, inflicting all the damage possible on their war resources. The occupation of Dalton by General Bragg had been accidental. He had encamped there for a night in his retreat from Missionary Ridge, and had remained because it was ascertained next morning that the pursuit had ceased. Dalton is in a valley so broad as to give ample room for the deployment of the largest American army. Rocky-face, which bounds it on the the west, termi
Noses Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
esaw from end to end, the other division being on its right, and Hood's corps on the right of it, Hardee's extending from Loring's left across the Lost Mountain and Marietta road. The enemy approached as usual, under cover of successive lines of intrenchments. In these positions of the two armies there were sharp and incessant partial engagements until the 3d of July. On the 21st of June the extension of the Federal line to the south which had been protected by the swollen condition of Noses Creek, compelled the transfer of Hood's corps to our left, Wheelers troops occupying the ground it had left. On the 22d General Hood reported that Hindman's and Stevenson's divisions of his corps, having been attacked, had driven back the Federal troops and had taken a line of breastworks, from which they had been driven by the artillery of the enemy's main position. Subsequent detailed accounts of this affair prove that after the capture of the advanced line of breastworks General Hood direc
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
ough Snake Creek Gap to the railroad bridge at Resaca, a light intrenchment to cover 3000 or 4000 mertin's division to observe the Oostenaula from Resaca to Rome, and Kelly's little brigade to join thrk. Lieutenant-General Hood was dispatched to Resaca with three divisions immediately. The next moConfederate army moved from Dalton and reached Resaca just as the Federal troops approaching from Sn occupied the west face of the intrenchment of Resaca. Hardee's corps, also facing to the west, fored before being recalled. The occupation of Resaca being exceedingly hazardous, I determined to a supplies of intrenching tools. Two events at Resaca were greatly magnified to him. He says that to march by two good roads direct from Dalton to Resaca; and. the further fact that our post at ResacaResaca could hold out a longer time than our march to that point would require. Mr. Davis and General Sorks, not on ridges and ravines. In leaving Resaca I hoped to find a favorable position near Calh[2 more...]
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
were in a valley where their batteries were completely commanded by ours. The army abandoned the ground before daybreak and crossed the Etowah after noon, and encamped near the railroad. Wheeler's cavalry was placed in observation above, and Jackson's below our main body. No movement of the enemy was discovered until the 22d, when General Jackson reported their army moving toward Stilesboro‘, as if to cross the Etowah near that place; they crossed on the 23d. On the 24th Hardee's and Poup Kenesaw Mountain. From the Valentine, published by the Western & Atlantic R. R. Co. facing to the west. The right of the Federal army made a corresponding change of front by which it faced to the east. It was opposed in this manoeuvre by Jackson's cavalry as well as 2500 men can resist 30,000. The angle where Hardee's right joined Loring's left was soon found to be a very weak point, and on the 17th another position was chosen, including the crest of Kenesaw, which Colonel Presstman pr
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
oad is Rocky-face, which aided the Federals. The small military value of mountains is indicated by the fact that in the Federal attack on June 27th our troops on Kenesaw suffered more than those on the plain. During the previous winter Major-General Gilmer, chief engineer, had wisely made an admirable base for our army by intre. The angle where Hardee's right joined Loring's left was soon found to be a very weak point, and on the 17th another position was chosen, including the crest of Kenesaw, which Colonel Presstman prepared for occupation by the 19th, when it was assumed by the army. In this position two divisions of Loring's corps occupied the crest of Kenesaw from end to end, the other division being on its right, and Hood's corps on the right of it, Hardee's extending from Loring's left across the Lost Mountain and Marietta road. The enemy approached as usual, under cover of successive lines of intrenchments. In these positions of the two armies there were sharp and ince
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
Resaca to Rome, and Kelly's little brigade to join the cavalry on the Cleveland road. On the 4th the Federal army, including the troops from Knoxville, was at Ringgold. Next day it skirmished until dark with our advanced guard of cavalry. This was repeated on the 6th. On the 7th it moved forward, driving our cavalry from Tunerior strength of the Federal army made the chances of battle altogether in its favor. It had also places of refuge in case of defeat, in the intrenched pass of Ringgold and in the fortress of Chattanooga; while we, if beaten, had none nearer than Atlanta, 100 miles off, with three rivers intervening. General Sherman's course in, the great numerical superiority of the enemy made the chances of battle much against us, and even if beaten they had a safe refuge behind the fortified pass of Ringgold and in the fortress of Chattanooga. Our refuge, in case of defeat, was in Atlanta, 100 miles off, with three rivers intervening. Therefore victory for us could
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
th, when General Bragg [see note, Vol. III., p. 711] wrote a plan of campaign which was delivered to me on the 18th by his secretary, Colonel Sale. It prescribed my invasion of Tennessee with an army of 75,000 men, including Longstreet's corps, then near Morristown, Tennessee. When necessary supplies and transportation were collected at Dalton, the additional troops, except Longstreet's, would be sent there; and this army and Longstreet's corps would march to meet at Kingston, on the Tennessee River, and thence into the valley of Duck River. Being invited to give my views, I suggested that the enemy could defeat the plan, either by attacking one of our two bodies of troops on the march, with their united forces, or by advancing against Dalton before our forces there should be equipped for the field; for it was certain that they would be able to take the field before we could be ready. I proposed, therefore, that the additional troops should be sent to Dalton in time to give us
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
ro‘, as if to cross the Etowah near that place; they crossed on the 23d. On the 24th Hardee's and Polk's corps encamped on the road from Stilesboro' to Atlanta, south-east of Dallas, and Hood's four miles from New Hope Church, on the road from Allatoona. On the 25th the Federal army was a little east of Dallas, and Hood's corps was placed with its center at New Hope Church, Polk's on his left, and Hardee's prolonging the line to the Atlanta road, which was held by its left. A little before 6not prevent the desultory fighting, which was kept up while daylight lasted. In this the great inequality of force compelled us to employ dismounted cavalry. On the 4th or 5th of June the Federal army reached the railroad between Ackworth and Allatoona. The Confederate forces then moved to a position carefully marked out by Colonel Presstman, its left on Lost Mountain, and its right, of cavalry, beyond the railroad and somewhat covered by Noonday Creek, a line much too long for our strength.
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