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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
, extending a mile north of Stewart's, and Bate's also on the crest of the hill, and extending a mile south of the gap. Stevenson's was formed across the valley east of the ridge, his left meeting Cheatham's right; Hindman in line with Stevenson andating that these were not unfavorable to an attack, Lieutenant-General Hood was directed to make one with Stewart's and Stevenson's divisions, strengthened by four brigades from the center and left. He was instructed to make a half change of front rps to our left, Wheelers troops occupying the ground it had left. On the 22d General Hood reported that Hindman's and Stevenson's divisions of his corps, having been attacked, had driven back the Federal troops and had taken a line of breastworks,were attacked in their rifle-pits by a Federal line of battle, and on the 25th a similar assault was made upon those of Stevenson's division. Both were repulsed, with heavy proportionate losses to the assailants. In the morning of the 27th, afte
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.36
at least a part of General Polk's troops to my command. Then the cavalry with convalescent horses was ordered to the front,--Martin's division to observe the Oostenaula from Resaca to Rome, and Kelly's little brigade to join the cavalry on the Cleveland road. On the 4th the Federal army, including the troops from Knoxville, was at Ringgold. Next day it skirmished until dark with our advanced guard of cavalry. This was repeated on the 6th. On the 7th it moved forward, driving our cavalry from Tunnel Hill, and taking a position in the afternoon in front of the railroad gap, and parallel to Rocky-face — the right a mile south of the gap, and the left near the Cleveland road. Until that day I had regarded a battle in the broad valley in which Dalton stands as inevitable. The greatly superior strength of the Federal army made the chances of battle altogether in its favor. It had also places of refuge in case of defeat, in the intrenched pass of Ringgold and in the fortress of
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 5.36
ll he gives many others, most of which, depend on misrepresentations of the strength of the positions I occupied. They were not stronger than General Lee's; indeed, my course was as like his as the dissimilarity of the two Federal commanders permitted. As his had increased his great fame, it is not probable that the people, who admired his course, condemned another similar one. As to Georgia, the State most interested, its two most influential citizens, Governor Joseph E. Brown and General Howell Cobb, remonstrated against my removal. The assertions in Mr. B. H. Hill's letter [of October 12th, 1.878] quoted by Mr. Davis [ I. And F., Vol. II., p. 557] do not agree with those in his oration delivered in Atlanta in 1875. Mr. Hill said in the oration: I know that he (Mr. Davis) consulted General Lee fully, earnestly, and anxiously before this perhaps unfortunate removal. That assertion is contradicted by one whose testimony is above question — for in Southern estimation he has no
John R. Polk (search for this): chapter 5.36
army was forming in front of them. The left of Polk's corps occupied the west face of the intrenchmss the Oostenaula about midnight,--Hardee's and Polk's corps by the railroad and trestle bridges, anivision from Dodge's corps. The height held by Polk was carried, and the position intrenched under my would follow each road, it was arranged that Polk's corps should engage the column on the direct Its length was equal to the front of Hood's and Polk's and half of Hardee's corps. They were placedld-pieces freely. During the evening Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hood, the latter being spokesman, was placed with its center at New Hope Church, Polk's on his left, and Hardee's prolonging the linebliquely to it, and attack at dawn — Hardee and Polk to join in the battle successively as the succe (not reported); Hardee's corps, 286; Loring's (Polk's), 522,--total, 808. This, no doubt, is a trussippi and east Louisiana given me by Lieutenant-General Polk, just from the command of that depart[9 more...]
n valley in front, and a deep one in rear of it. Its length was equal to the front of Hood's and Polk's and half of Hardee's corps. They were placed in that order from right to left. As I rode along the line while the troops were forming, General Shoup, chief of artillery, pointed out to me a space of 150 or 200 yards, which he thought might be enfiladed by artillery on a hill a half mile beyond Hood's right and in front of the prolongation of our line, if the enemy should clear away the therwise very dangerous, two new positions for the army were chosen, one nine or ten miles south of Marietta, and the other on the high ground near the Chattahoochee. Colonel Presstman was desired to prepare the first for occupation, and Brigadier-General Shoup, commander of the artillery, was instructed to strengthen the other with a line of redoubts devised by himself. The troops took the first position in the morning of the 3d, and as General Sherman was strengthening his right greatly, t
te most interested, its two most influential citizens, Governor Joseph E. Brown and General Howell Cobb, remonstrated against my removal. The assertions in Mr. B. H. Hill's letter [of October 12th, 1.878] quoted by Mr. Davis [ I. And F., Vol. II., p. 557] do not agree with those in his oration delivered in Atlanta in 1875. Mr.Mr. Hill said in the oration: I know that he (Mr. Davis) consulted General Lee fully, earnestly, and anxiously before this perhaps unfortunate removal. That assertion is contradicted by one whose testimony is above question — for in Southern estimation he has no superior as gentleman, soldier, and civilian--General Hampton. General l Sherman appreciated its strength, for he made no attack, although he was before it about six weeks. I was a party to no such conversations as those given by Mr. Hill. No soldier above idiocy could express the opinions he ascribes to me. Mr. Davis condemned me for not fighting. General Sherman's testimony and that of the
John B. Hood (search for this): chapter 5.36
ngaged with those troops until dark. Lieutenant-General Hood was dispatched to Resaca with three drous attack being made on Hindman's division of Hood's corps, which was handsomely repulsed. In these were not unfavorable to an attack, Lieutenant-General Hood was directed to make one with Stewartme to hope for a more important success; so General Hood was directed to renew the fight next mornino Lay's Ferry immediately, and the order to General Hood was revoked; also, Lieutenant-Colonel S. W.d crossed the Oostenaula was untrue. Lieutenant-General Hood was therefore again ordered to assailnorth of the river, and the orders to Lieutenant-General Hood were countermanded, but the order froe eighty yards and began to intrench them. General Hood had their fire opened at once. A ravine ley has been compelled to advance much General John B. Hood, C. S. A. From a photograph. more slowegarded as evidence of competence. General. Hood came to my quarters early in the morning of the[4 more...]
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 5.36
Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. by Joseph E. Johnston, General, C. S. A. Buzzard-Roost Gap. From a War-time sct prescribed to him by General Grant was to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of td, he could have there easily withstood the attack of all Johnston's army. Had he done so, all Johnston's army would have bJohnston's army would have been upon him at the dawn of the next day, the cannon giving General Sherman intelligence of the movement of that army. Aboulevation they occupied, In his published Narrative General Johnston says: On riding from the right to the left, afterrs Sherman says, in continuation of the quotation made by Johnston: This was the hardest fight of the campaign up to that date, and it is well described by Johnston in his Narrative [pp. 342, 343], where he admits his loss in killed and woundeds, no doubt, is a true and fair statement; but, as usual, Johnston over-estimates our loss, putting it at 6000, whereas our
Daniel McCook (search for this): chapter 5.36
it was utterly impossible. There would have been much more exposure in that than in mounting and crossing the little rebel parapet ; but at one point, seventy-five yards in front of Cheatham's line, a party of Federal soldiers, finding themselves sheltered from his missiles by the form of the ground, made a parapet there which became connected with the main work. Surgeon Joseph A. Stillwell, 22d Indiana Volunteers, writes to the editors that the point referred to was in front of General Daniel McCook's brigade, and was seventy-five feet from the enemy, and commanded by half a mile of the Confederate works. As the extension of the Federal intrenched line to their right had brought it nearer to Atlanta than was our left, and had made our position otherwise very dangerous, two new positions for the army were chosen, one nine or ten miles south of Marietta, and the other on the high ground near the Chattahoochee. Colonel Presstman was desired to prepare the first for occupation
Carter L. Stevenson (search for this): chapter 5.36
the hill, extending a mile north of Stewart's, and Bate's also on the crest of the hill, and extending a mile south of the gap. Stevenson's was formed across the valley east of the ridge, his left meeting Cheatham's right; Hindman in line with Stevenson and on his right; Cleburne behind Mill Creek and in front of Dalton. Walker's division was in reserve. Cantey with his division arrived at Resaca that evening (7th) and was charged with the defense of the place. During the day our cavalry e also p. 282.] editors. but no attempt was made to retake it. Sherman also says that Hooker's corps had also some handsome fighting on the left, . . . capturing a 4-gun intrenched battery. . . . From our view in the morning of the 15th, Major-General Stevenson advanced four guns some eighty yards and began to intrench them. General Hood had their fire opened at once. A ravine leading from the Federal line within easy musket-range enabled the Federal troops to drive away the gunners; but thei
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