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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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William B. Bate (search for this): chapter 5.36
r side of the ridge. For that object A. P. Stewart's division was placed in the gap, Cheatham's on the crest of the hill, extending a mile north of Stewart's, and Bate's also on the crest of the hill, and extending a mile south of the gap. Stevenson's was formed across the valley east of the ridge, his left meeting Cheatham's rign, but the Federal troops were defeated with a loss proportionate to their courage. Assaults as vigorous and resolute were made at the same time on Stewart and on Bate, and were handsomely repulsed. The Confederates, who fought under cover, had but trifling losses in these combats, but the Federal troops, fully exposed, must havetween the two places. Spirited fighting was renewed in and near the gap as well as on the northern front. The most vigorous of them was made late in the day, on Bate's division, and repulsed. At night information was received from our scouts near the south end of Rocky-face, that the Army of the Tennessee was intrenching in Sn
Joseph E. Brown (search for this): chapter 5.36
ow in the army, in every battle of which he had been distinguished. Major-General W. W. Loring succeeded to the command of the corps. A division of Georgia militia under Major-General G. W. Smith, transferred to the Confederate service by Governor Brown, was charged with the defense of the bridges and ferries of the Chattahoochee, for the safety of Atlanta. On the 16th Hardee's corps was placed on the high ground east of Mud Creek, Confederates dragging guns up Kenesaw Mountain. From the Federal commanders permitted. As his had increased his great fame, it is not probable that the people, who admired his course, condemned another similar one. As to Georgia, the State most interested, its two most influential citizens, Governor Joseph E. Brown and General Howell Cobb, remonstrated against my removal. The assertions in Mr. B. H. Hill's letter [of October 12th, 1.878] quoted by Mr. Davis [ I. And F., Vol. II., p. 557] do not agree with those in his oration delivered in Atlan
William A. Quarles (search for this): chapter 5.36
, which induced him to hope that I would soon be able to commence active operations against the enemy,--the men being tolerably well clothed, with a large reserve of small-arms, the morning reports exhibiting an effective total that exceeded in number that actually engaged on the Confederate side in any battle of the war. Yet this army itself had lost in the recent campaign at least 25,000 men in action, while 17,000 had been transferred from it in Longstreet's corps, and the two brigades (Quarles's and Baldwin's) that had been sent to Mississippi; so that it was then weaker by 40,000 men than it had been when engaged on the Confederate side in the battle of Chickamauga, in the September preceding. In the inspections, which were made as soon as practicable, the appearance of the army was very far from being matter of much congratulation. Instead of a reserve of muskets there was a deficiency of six thousand and as great a one of blankets, while the number of bare feet was painful
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 5.36
d in mountains, ravines, and streams, and General Sherman claims that those features of the country and found them too strong to be seized. General Sherman says that if McPherson had placed his whoe dawn of the next day, the cannon giving General Sherman intelligence of the movement of that armyne made those manoeuvres free from risk. General Sherman thinks that the impracticable nature of ts is proved by the name Hell hole, which, General Sherman says, was given the place by the Federal d prisoners in the hollow before them. General Sherman does not refer to this combat in his Memo1864. from a sketch made at the time. General Sherman is the slenderer figure, on the right. Hhomas lost nearly 2000 men. In his Memoirs Sherman says, in continuation of the quotation made banded by Major-General G. W. Smith. As General Sherman says, i.t was really a continuous battle Mr. Davis condemned me for not fighting. General Sherman's testimony and that of the Military Ceme[16 more...]
John C. Brown (search for this): chapter 5.36
Hardee was requested to send Granbury's Texan brigade to the help of our people, and to take command there himself. These accessions soon decided the contest, and the enemy was driven down the hill. A. sharp engagement was occurring at the same time on the crest of the mountain, where our right and center joined, between Pettus's brigade holding that point and troops of the Fourth Corps attacking it. The assailants were repulsed, however. The vigor of this attack suggested the addition of Brown's brigade to Pettus's. On the 9th a much larger force assailed the troops at the angle, and with great determination, but the Federal troops were defeated with a loss proportionate to their courage. Assaults as vigorous and resolute were made at the same time on Stewart and on Bate, and were handsomely repulsed. The Confederates, who fought under cover, had but trifling losses in these combats, but the Federal troops, fully exposed, must have lost heavily — the more because American sol
D. H. Maury (search for this): chapter 5.36
ty in the passage of Peach Tree Creek, I expected to attack him. If successful, we should obtain important results, for the enemy's retreat would be on two sides of a triangle and our march on one. If we should not succeed, our intrenchments would give us a safe refuge, where we could hold back the enemy until the promised State troops should join us; then, placing them on the nearest defenses of the place (where there were, or ought to be, seven sea-coast rifles, sent us from Mobile by General Maury), I would attack the Federals in flank with the three Confederate corps. If we were successful, they would be driven against the Chattahoochee below the railroad, where there are no fords, or away from their supplies, as we might fall on their left or right flank. If unsuccessful, we could take refuge in Atlanta, which we could hold indefinitely; for it was too strong to be taken by assault, and too extensive to be invested. This would win the campaign, the object of which the country
Oliver L. Baldwin (search for this): chapter 5.36
d him to hope that I would soon be able to commence active operations against the enemy,--the men being tolerably well clothed, with a large reserve of small-arms, the morning reports exhibiting an effective total that exceeded in number that actually engaged on the Confederate side in any battle of the war. Yet this army itself had lost in the recent campaign at least 25,000 men in action, while 17,000 had been transferred from it in Longstreet's corps, and the two brigades (Quarles's and Baldwin's) that had been sent to Mississippi; so that it was then weaker by 40,000 men than it had been when engaged on the Confederate side in the battle of Chickamauga, in the September preceding. In the inspections, which were made as soon as practicable, the appearance of the army was very far from being matter of much congratulation. Instead of a reserve of muskets there was a deficiency of six thousand and as great a one of blankets, while the number of bare feet was painful to see. The a
William H. Jackson (search for this): chapter 5.36
he armies confronted each other the advantages of ground were equal and unimportant, both parties depending for protection on earth-works, not on ridges and ravines. In leaving Resaca I hoped to find a favorable position near Calhoun, but there was none; and the army, after resting 18 or 20 hours near that place, early in the morning of the 17th moved on seven or eight miles to Adairsville, where we were joined by the cavalry of General Polk's command, a division of 3700 men under General W. H. Jackson. Our map represented the valley in which the railroad lies as narrow enough for our army formed across it to occupy the heights on each side with its flanks, and therefore I intended to await the enemy's attack there; but the breadth of the valley far exceeded the front of our army in order of battle. So another plan was devised. Two roads lead southward from Adairsville,--one directly through Cassville; the other follows the railroad through Kingston, turns to the left there, and
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 5.36
sertions in Mr. B. H. Hill's letter [of October 12th, 1.878] quoted by Mr. Davis [ I. And F., Vol. II., p. 557] do not agree with those in his oration delivered in Atlanta in 1875. Mr. Hill said in the oration: I know that he (Mr. Davis) consulted General Lee fully, earnestly, and anxiously before this perhaps unfortunate removal. That assertion is contradicted by one whose testimony is above question — for in Southern estimation he has no superior as gentleman, soldier, and civilian--General Hampton. General Lee had a conversation with him on the subject, of which he wrote to me: On that occasion he expressed great regret that you had been removed, and said that he had done all in his power to prevent it. The Secretary of War had recently been at his Headquarters near Petersburg to consult as to this matter, and General Lee assured me that he had urged Mr. Seddon not to remove you from command, and had said to him that if you could not command the army we had no one who could.
taff-officer General Bragg, I pointed out the necessity of great preparations to take the offensive, such as large additions to the number of troops, an ample supply of field transportation, subsistence stores, and forage, a bridge equipage, and fresh artillery horses. This letter was acknowledged on the 4th of March, but not really replied to until the 12th, when General Bragg [see note, Vol. III., p. 711] wrote a plan of campaign which was delivered to me on the 18th by his secretary, Colonel Sale. It prescribed my invasion of Tennessee with an army of 75,000 men, including Longstreet's corps, then near Morristown, Tennessee. When necessary supplies and transportation were collected at Dalton, the additional troops, except Longstreet's, would be sent there; and this army and Longstreet's corps would march to meet at Kingston, on the Tennessee River, and thence into the valley of Duck River. Being invited to give my views, I suggested that the enemy could defeat the plan, eithe
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