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Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
rom that quarter; while Hooker, Palmer, and myself, under Thomas, were to control the infantry and artillery of the Army of the Cumberland. In a few days I moved Wagner's (afterward Newton's) division and T. J. Wood's of my new corps to Cleveland, east Tennessee. Rations, clothing, transportation, and ammunition came pouring in nd opened; and quickly the enemy's skirmish-line was drawn back to their main work. Harker, commanding one brigade, led his column rapidly over the open ground. Wagner did the same on Harker's left, and Kimball put his brigade in close support. The enemy's fire was terrific. Our men did not stop till they had gained the edge o corps, Osterhaus temporarily commanding the Fifteenth, and Ransom the Seventeenth. Thomas went to Chattanooga to defend the communications with Sherman's army. Wagner's division was sent to Chattanooga, and Corse's division to Rome. Colonel John E. Tourtellotte had a detachment garrisoning the works at Allatoona Pass. Hood
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
wheel of his armies. Schofield this time clung to the pivot. My command described an are of 25 miles radius aiming at Jonesboro‘, while Thomas followed the middle course. Both southern railways were to be seized, and the stations and road destroyncreasing fire from hostile cavalry and infantry, but did not stop till Logan had reached the wooded ridge beyond, near Jonesboro‘. The command was soon put into position, and worked all night and during the next morning to intrench, and build the required bridges. Hood had sent Hardee by rail, with perhaps half of his command, to hold Jonesboro‘. My Confederate classmate, S. D. Lee, who had had the immediate assault at Ezra Church, here appeared again, commanding Cheatham's corps. At 3 P. Met by Logan and Ransom, and thoroughly repulsed. Hood now abandoned Atlanta, and united with Hardee in the vicinity of Jonesboro‘, near Love-joy's Station. Thomas, joining my left flank, fought mainly the battle of September 1st. During the rest
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
and Army, of the Cumberland, October 19th, 1863.--editors. near Chattanooga; that of the Tennessee, under McPherson, scattered front Huntsvi our line of supply which ran through Louisville, Nashville, and Chattanooga, guarding it against enemies within and without his boundaries, Clay, toward. Dalton, Georgia. The three railway lines uniting Chattanooga, Cleveland, and Dalton form an almost equilateral triangle. Dalw deemed strong enough to operate alone; hence he was brought to Chattanooga instead, and sent thence to Villanow, soon after to pass throughnding the Fifteenth, and Ransom the Seventeenth. Thomas went to Chattanooga to defend the communications with Sherman's army. Wagner's division was sent to Chattanooga, and Corse's division to Rome. Colonel John E. Tourtellotte had a detachment garrisoning the works at Allatoonaaimed for Resaca. Schofield was warned, and got ready to defend Chattanooga, while Sherman now made forced marches so as to overtake his ene
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
The struggle for Atlanta. by Oliver O. Howard, Major-General, U. S. A. The forces under Generaas, on the pivot, taking the shortest line to Atlanta; McPherson, on the outer flank, coming by Ros McPherson's left, had gone diagonally toward Atlanta, sweeping the hostile cavalry of Wheeler befoets and well secured by infantry supports. Atlanta appeared to us like a well-fortified citadel n as Hood, from a prominent point in front of Atlanta, beheld Hardee's lines emerging from the thicn to attack Logan all along the east front of Atlanta. At the time, I sat beside Schofield and Sherps, in the Foreground. From the Panorama of Atlanta. till night, when Hood again yielded the as, in order to throw itself forward close to Atlanta on the south-west side, near Ezra Church. Sk and thoroughly repulsed. Hood now abandoned Atlanta, and united with Hardee in the vicinity of JoEtowah. Now, leaving one corps, Slocum's, at Atlanta, he followed Hood with the remainder of his f[6 more...]
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
e reentrant angles on Hardee's front. Schofield's right division, under Judah, had a fearful struggle, losing six hundred men; the others, coming to its help, captured and secured a part of the enemy's intrenchments. Hood assailed my left after 3 P. M. The front attack was repulsed, but heavy columns came surging around Stanley's left. Everybody, battery men and supporting infantry, did wonders; still, but for help promptly rendered, Sherman's whole line, like the left of Wellington's at Waterloo, would soon have been rolled up and displaced. But Colonel Morgan of my staff, who had been sent in time, brought up Williams's division from Hooker's corps as quickly as men could march. Stanley's brave artillerymen were thus succored before they were forced to yield their ground, and Hood, disappointed, returned to his trenches. The next day, the 15th, came Hooker's attack. He advanced in a column of deployed brigades. Both armies watched with eager excitement this passage-at-arms.
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
or held in reserve under capable chiefs. Besides an equal number of guards of his large depots and long line of supply, Sherman had an effective field force of 100,000,—50,000 with Thomas, 35,000 with McPherson, 15,000 with Schofield. Sherman was gratified at the number of his force; for two years before, he had been held up as worthy of special distrust because he had declared to Secretary Cameron that before they were done with offensive operations on the line from the Big Sandy to Paducah, 200,000 men would be required. A few changes of organization were made. Slocum's corps, the Twelfth, and mine, the Eleventh, were consolidated, making a new Twentieth, and Hooker was assigned to its command. I went at once to Loudon, east Tennessee, to take the Fourth Corps and relieve General Gordon Granger, to enable him to have a leave of absence. Slocum was sent to Vicksburg, Mississippi, to watch the great river from that quarter; while Hooker, Palmer, and myself, under Thomas,
Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
rave, determined, and rash man.--editors. Thomas, on the pivot, taking the shortest line to Atlanta; McPherson, on the outer flank, coming by Roswell to Decatur, with Schofield between. As the several columns were crossing the famous Peach Tree Creek my corps was divided. I was sent, with Stanley and Wood, to connect with Schofield, causing a gap of two miles. Newton remained on Thomas's left; on Newton's right was Ward; next, Geary; then, Williams; last, Palmer's corps; all, having cro ground, mostly woodland, and very uneven with cross-ravines. Just at this time, much to our comfort and to his surprise, Johnston was removed, and Hood placed in command of the Confederate army. Johnston had planned to attack Sherman at Peach Tree Creek, expecting just such a division between our wings as we made. Hood endeavored to carry out the plan. A. P. Stewart now had Polk's corps, and Cheatham took Hood's. Hardee on the right and Stewart on his left, in lines that overlapped Newt
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
e treated in the most honorable manner as prisoners of war. I have the honor to be, very respectfully yours, S. G. French, Major-General Commanding Forces, Confederate States. To which I made the following reply: headquarters, Fourth division, Fifteenth Army Corps, Allatoona, Georgia, 8:30 A. M., October 5th, 1864. Major-General S. G. French, Confederate States Army, etc.: Your comnlnunication demanding surrender of my command I acknowledge receipt of, and respectfully reply that we are prepared for the needless effusion of blood whenever it is agreeable to you. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John M. Corse, Brigadier-General Commanding Forces, United States. I then hastened to my different commands, informing them of the object of the flag, etc., my answer, and the importance and necessity of their preparing for hard fighting. . . . I had hardly issued the incipient orders when the storm broke in all its fury. . . . The fighting up to . . . about
Cincinnati, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
commander engaged. Similarly, but with easier approaches than ours, Schofield kept Johnston's attention at the east and north. Such was the demonstration, while McPherson was making his long detour through Villanow, Snake Creek Part of the battle-field of Resaca, from a War-time photograph Gap, and out into Sugar Valley. He found the gap unoccupied; and so, with Kilpatrick's small cavalry detachment ahead, Lieutenant James Oates wrote to the editors on July 8th, 1887, from Cincinnati, Ark., as follows: General Howard is in error in the above statement. On May 1st the 9th Illinois Mounted Infantry broke camp at Decatur, Alabama, to take part in the Atlanta campaign. On the afternoon of May 8th the regiment came up with General McPherson at Villanow. Lieutenant-Colonel J. J. Phillips, who was in command, received orders to take the advance of the Army of the Tennessee, and did so at once, Company K, Lieutenant James Oates in command, taking the lead through Snake Cre
Peach Tree (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.40
Pherson, to get a better left, ordered Blair to seize Bald Hill. General Force, of Leggett's division, supported by Giles A. Smith, who now had Gresham's place, charged the hill and carried it, though with a heavy loss. No time ran to waste till this point was manned with batteries protected by thick parapets and well secured by infantry supports. Atlanta appeared to us like a well-fortified citadel with outer and inner works. After Thomas had beaten him, Hood resolved to give up the Peach Tree line; so, after dark, he drew back two corps into those outer works. Hardee, however, was destined to a special duty. About midnight he gathered his four divisions into Atlanta: Bate led the way; Walker came next; Cleburne, having now left the vicinity of Bald Hill (for he was soon to go beyond it), followed; then came Maney in rear. They pushed out far south and around Gresham's sleeping soldiers; they kept on eastward till Hardee's advance was within two miles of Decatur, and his re
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