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Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 6.49
r the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, the gossip of camps and capitals, and the misstatements of well-known facts that go to make up the old story of many versions of an arrangement at Washington whereby Kirby Smith's army was to recede before the army of General Banks, falling back through the State of Texas, and finally to disband. In anticipation of this, the story continues, Confederate cotton to an amount named, believed to be 25,000 bales, was to be gathered at points convenient for transportation and taken by three commissioners, residents of New Orleans, who would accompany the expedition under Banks, and sold by them; the proceeds to be divided like naval prize money, and to go to make a fu
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 6.49
he Atchafalaya, the high water of that stream would have arrested my farther progress. An intercepted dispatch from General Sherman to General A. J. Smith, directing the immediate return of his force to Vicksburg, removed the last doubt in my mind ower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith from obeying Sherman's order to return to Vicksburg in time for the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after ShermSherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, the gossip of camps and capitals, and the misstatements of well-known facts that go to make up the old story of many versions of an arrangement at Washington whereby Kirby Smith's army was to recede before the army of General Banks, falling back thr
John S. Marmaduke (search for this): chapter 6.49
nsports. The construction of the dam, aided by a temporary rise in Red River, enabled Admiral Porter to get his fleet over the falls. Had he delayed but one week longer, our whole infantry force would have been united against him. Banks evacuated Alexandria on the 12th and 13th of May, the fleet quitted the Red River, and the campaign ended with the occupation of all the country we had held at its beginning, as well as of the lower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith from obeying Sherman's order to return to Vicksburg in time for the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, the gossip of camps and capitals, and the misstatements of well
Hamilton P. Bee (search for this): chapter 6.49
on the 28th, and the battle of Jenkins's Ferry on the Saline, April 30th, completed his discomfiture. [See p. 375.] He retreated to Little Rock. Churchill, Parsons, and Walker were Brigadier-General C. J. Polignac, C. S. A. From a photograph. at once marched across country to the support of Taylor, but before the junction could be effected Banks had gone. To return to Taylor, after the enemy left Grand Ecore General Taylor attacked his rear at Cloutierville, whilst a detachment under Bee held the Federal advance in check at Monette's Ferry. General Taylor's force was, however, too weak to warrant the hope that he could seriously impede the march of Banks's column. After the latter reached Alexandria, General Taylor transferred a part of his command to the river below Alexandria, and with unparalleled audacity and great ability and success operated on the enemy's gun-boats and transports. The construction of the dam, aided by a temporary rise in Red River, enabled Admiral
Henry Goddard Thomas (search for this): chapter 6.49
him. Banks evacuated Alexandria on the 12th and 13th of May, the fleet quitted the Red River, and the campaign ended with the occupation of all the country we had held at its beginning, as well as of the lower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith from obeying Sherman's order to return to Vicksburg in time for the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, the gossip of camps and capitals, and the misstatements of well-known facts that go to make up the old story of many versions of an arrangement at Washington whereby Kirby Smith's army was to recede before the army of General Banks, falling back through the State of Texas, and finally to disb
Richard Taylor (search for this): chapter 6.49
Fort De Russy, taking it in reverse, that General Taylor was not allowed time to concentrate and cos of his transports, to Alexandria, placed General Taylor in a very embarrassing position. He extrihe coast, I reduced the number Lieutenant-General Richard Taylor. From a photograph. of men holrms could be brought to oppose his movements. Taylor had at Mansfield, after the junction of Green,f vital importance. All the infantry not with Taylor, opposed to Banks, was directed on Shreveport.field. I returned to Shreveport and wrote General Taylor not to risk a general engagement, but to sh his infantry under Tappan and Parsons joined Taylor that night. The next morning Taylor, advancinTaylor, advancing in force, found the enemy in position at Pleasant Hill. Our troops attacked with vigor and at firHaving ridden forward at 2 A. M. on receipt of Taylor's report of the battle of Mansfield, I joined Taylor after dark on the 8th, a few yards in rear of the battle-field of that day. Polignac's (previ[18 more...]
Andrew J. Smith (search for this): chapter 6.49
12th of March a column of ten thousand men, composed of portions of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Army Corps under General A. J. Smith, moved down from Vicksburg to Simsport, and advanced with such celerity on Fort De Russy, taking it in reverse, thigh water of that stream would have arrested my farther progress. An intercepted dispatch from General Sherman to General A. J. Smith, directing the immediate return of his force to Vicksburg, removed the last doubt in my mind that Banks would withng, as well as of the lower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith from obeying Sherman's order to return to Vicksburg in time for the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin ShA. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail th
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 6.49
ntrepidity of Mouton's division resulted in a complete victory over the forces engaged. The battle of Mansfield was not an intentional violation of my instructions on General Taylor's part. The Federal cavalry had pushed forward so far in advance of their column as to completely cover its movement, and General Taylor reported to me by dispatch at 12 meridian of the day on which the battle took place, that there was no advance made from Grand Ecore except of cavalry. In fact, however, General Franklin with his infantry was on the march and at once pushed forward to the support of the cavalry. When General Mouton with his division drove in the cavalry, he struck the head of Franklin's troops, and by a vigorous and able attack, without waiting for orders from Taylor, repulsed and drove back Franklin's advance and opened the battle of Mansfield, which, when Taylor came to the front, with his accustomed boldness and vigor he pushed to a complete success. [See p. 353.] Churchill, wi
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 6.49
lligence of the debarkation of the enemy at Simsport, I ordered General Price, who commanded in Arkansas, to dispatch his entire infantry, cons's divisions, to Shreveport, and General Maxey to move toward General Price, and, as soon as Steele advanced, to join Price with his whole Price with his whole command, Indians included. The cavalry east of the Ouachita was directed to fall back toward Natchitoches, and subsequently to oppose, as faer the junction of Green, 11,000 effectives with 5000 infantry from Price's army in one day's march of him at Keachie. Price, with 6000 or 8Price, with 6000 or 8000 cavalry, was engaged in holding in check the advance of Steele, whose column, according to our information, did not number less than 15,0try not with Taylor, opposed to Banks, was directed on Shreveport. Price with his cavalry command was instructed to delay the march of Steelver at Fulton, the other direct to Shreveport. I consequently held Price's infantry, under Churchill, a few days at Shreveport. Steele's he
Thomas J. Churchill (search for this): chapter 6.49
dered General Price, who commanded in Arkansas, to dispatch his entire infantry, consisting of Churchill's and Parsons's divisions, to Shreveport, and General Maxey to move toward General Price, and, river at Fulton, the other direct to Shreveport. I consequently held Price's infantry, under Churchill, a few days at Shreveport. Steele's hesitation and the reports of the advance of Banks's cavalry caused me, on the 4th of April, to move Churchill to Keachie, a point twenty miles in rear of Mansfield, where the road divides to go to Marshall and Shreveport. He was directed to report to Gennt, with his accustomed boldness and vigor he pushed to a complete success. [See p. 353.] Churchill, with his infantry under Tappan and Parsons joined Taylor that night. The next morning Taylore Saline, April 30th, completed his discomfiture. [See p. 375.] He retreated to Little Rock. Churchill, Parsons, and Walker were Brigadier-General C. J. Polignac, C. S. A. From a photograph. at
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