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A. A. Gibson (search for this): chapter 7.53
is pleasing respite from prison life, and expressed our gratitude to the kind-hearted captain. But we were awakened early on the following morning by the announcement from the distressed captain, who had had a second interview with the admiral, that we were all to be placed in irons and conveyed to Boston by rail. We remonstrated gently against this unprecedented mode of treating prisoners of war, but to no purpose. When we reached the wharf at Fort Warren, the commanding officer, Major A. A. Gibson, inquired the cause of our being in irons, and upon being informed that they were placed upon us by order of Admiral Paulding, he made the further inquiry whether or, not we had been guilty of any rebellious conduct as prisoners of war; this being answered in the negative, he replied that he had never heard of such treatment, and that we could not be landed on the island until the irons were removed. Soon after becoming settled in my new quarters I addressed a communication to the S
Percival Drayton (search for this): chapter 7.53
s own. I remained on board six days, during which time I was visited by nearly all the commanding officers of the fleet. Within an hour after I was taken on board the Ossipee Admiral Farragut sent for me to be brought on board his flag-ship, and when I reached her deck he expressed regret at meeting me under such circumstances, to which I replied that he was not half as sorry to see me as I was to see him. Surrender of the Tennessee. from a War-time sketch. His flag-captain, Percival Drayton, remarked, You have one consolation, Johnston; no one can say that you have not nobly defended the honor of the Confederate flag to-day. I thanked him, but gave all the honor due to its defense to Admiral Buchanan, who was the true hero of the battle; and when the disparity between the forces engaged is duly considered, I am constrained to believe that history will give him his just meed of praise. The casualties on board the Tennessee were two killed and nine wounded. Her armor was
James C. Palmer (search for this): chapter 7.53
tally inadequate to the performance of the work expected of it. After I left the Tennessee Admiral Buchanan was transferred to a small transport steamer and taken to the hospital in the navy yard at Pensacola, where he was accompanied by his own fleet-surgeon, Dr. D. B. Conrad, and his aides. Five days after the admiral's departure I was transported to Pensacola and transferred to the receiving-ship Potomac, lying off the navy yard; but as soon as Admiral Farragut's fleet-surgeon, Dr. James C. Palmer, heard of my arrival he had me removed to the hospital, owing to the fact of my suffering at the time with a painful disease. On reaching the hospital I found myself placed in a room near to that occupied by Admiral Buchanan, and immediately adjoining that of Captain J. R. M. Mullany, who had commanded the steamer Oneida of the fleet, and had had the misfortune to have his left arm shot away during the action. I had known him long before the war, and called upon him at once to offer
Stephen R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 7.53
en General B. F. Butler, whose lines were between us and that point, was advised of our presence he refused to allow us to pass through them, on account of President Davis's proclamation declaring him an outlaw. The Commissioner of Exchange informed General Grant of the fact, and he came alongside the Assyrian with his steamer, and informed us that we should be forwarded to Richmond on the following day. True to his promise, he had us landed near Dutch Gap the next morning, whence we were conveyed Commander J. D. Johnston, C. S. N. in ambulances to Varina Landing, where we found a Confederate steamer awaiting us with the Federal prisoners on board. We soon exchanged places to the tune of Dixie. After a delightful visit of five days at the house of Mrs. Stephen R. Mallory, the charming wife of the Secretary of the Confederate Navy, I was ordered to return to Mobile and report for duty under Commodore Ebenezer Farrand, who had succeeded Admiral Buchanan in command of that station.
George W. Fox (search for this): chapter 7.53
ding, he made the further inquiry whether or, not we had been guilty of any rebellious conduct as prisoners of war; this being answered in the negative, he replied that he had never heard of such treatment, and that we could not be landed on the island until the irons were removed. Soon after becoming settled in my new quarters I addressed a communication to the Secretary of the Navy, inquiring whether or not he had authorized the action of Admiral Paulding, which was answered by Assistant-Secretary Fox, who disavowed the act, but excused it on the ground of repeated attempts of prisoners to escape. An order for the exchange of all the prisoners in the fort had reached the commanding officer previous to our arrival, and after ten days we left for City Point on the steamer Assyrian. We naturally supposed that on our arrival at City Point we would be immediately forwarded to the landing on James River, at which exchanges were usually made. But when General B. F. Butler, whose li
Roger Jones (search for this): chapter 7.53
ral Buchanan to charter two steamboats and proceed with them to Selma, to tow her down to Mobile, as soon as she was launched. I found on arrival at Selma that every preparation had been made for that purpose by the naval constructor in charge (Mr. Henry Pearce). She was immediately taken in tow by the steamboats and towed down to Mobile, to receive her machinery and battery, the latter having been cast at the Government foundry in Selma, under the superintendence of Commander Catesby ap Roger Jones, late commander of the Merrimac, who had acquired great distinction as an ordnance officer of the United States navy. The armor plating had been prepared at the rolling-mills of Atlanta, and was rapidly arriving. It consisted of plates of exceedingly tough and malleable iron seven inches wide, two inches thick, and 21 feet long. Three layers of the 2-inch plates were bolted on the forward end of the shield as far as the after end of the pilot-house (which extended about two feet above
D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 7.53
The Confederate naval force at Mobile at the time of Admiral Farragut's attack was commanded by Admiral Franklin Buchanan, The entire force of officers and men was about 470. Admiral Farragut's fleet consisted of six first-class steam sloops of undoubtedly mistook the Lackawanna for the Hartford. Admiral Farragut in his report (ibid., p. 402) says: The Lackawann not sustained by the official records of the fight. Admiral Farragut in his report says: She [the ram] was at this timWithin an hour after I was taken on board the Ossipee Admiral Farragut sent for me to be brought on board his flag-ship, andthe iron plating. The Board of Survey appointed by Admiral Farragut, and consisting of Captain T. A. Jenkins, Captain Jamship Potomac, lying off the navy yard; but as soon as Admiral Farragut's fleet-surgeon, Dr. James C. Palmer, heard of my arrton of the Tennessee, accompanied by my servant (whom Admiral Farragut had kindly allowed me to retain), for transportation
William E. Roy (search for this): chapter 7.53
m his just meed of praise. The casualties on board the Tennessee were two killed and nine wounded. Her armor was never penetrated, although she was under the heaviest fire for nearly four hours. One solid 15-inch shot struck her shield, at point-blank range, between two of the ports and caused an indentation of about twelve inches, but did not break the iron plating. The Board of Survey appointed by Admiral Farragut, and consisting of Captain T. A. Jenkins, Captain James Alden, Commander W. E. Le Roy, and Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson, reported in part as follows on the injuries received in the action, by the Tennessee. On the port side of the casemate the armor is also badly damaged from shot. On that side nearly amidship of the casemate, and between the two broadside guns, a 15-inch solid shot knocked a hole through the armor and backing, leaving on the inside an undetached mass of oak and pine splinters, about three by four feet, and projecting inside of the casemate a
P. U. Murphy (search for this): chapter 7.53
hree hastily improvised wooden vessels of our squadron. The Selma was speedily captured by one of these, the Metacomet, after a gallant resistance, during which seven of her crew and her executive officer were killed, and her commander, Lieutenant P. U. Murphy, was slightly wounded. The Gaines, commanded by Lieutenant John W. Bennett, which was run ashore near Fort Morgan to prevent her from sinking, had. received several shots below the water-line, and at night was burned by her own crew. T shot away during the action. I had known him long before the war, and called upon him at once to offer my condolence. After remaining in the hospital about three weeks I was placed on board a small ordnance steamer in company with Lieutenant-Commanding Murphy, late of the Selma, with Lieutenants Bradford and Wharton of the Tennessee, accompanied by my servant (whom Admiral Farragut had kindly allowed me to retain), for transportation to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. We reached our destination af
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 7.53
wered by Assistant-Secretary Fox, who disavowed the act, but excused it on the ground of repeated attempts of prisoners to escape. An order for the exchange of all the prisoners in the fort had reached the commanding officer previous to our arrival, and after ten days we left for City Point on the steamer Assyrian. We naturally supposed that on our arrival at City Point we would be immediately forwarded to the landing on James River, at which exchanges were usually made. But when General B. F. Butler, whose lines were between us and that point, was advised of our presence he refused to allow us to pass through them, on account of President Davis's proclamation declaring him an outlaw. The Commissioner of Exchange informed General Grant of the fact, and he came alongside the Assyrian with his steamer, and informed us that we should be forwarded to Richmond on the following day. True to his promise, he had us landed near Dutch Gap the next morning, whence we were conveyed Command
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