hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 618 0 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 585 15 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 560 2 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 372 0 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 333 11 Browse Search
George G. Meade 325 5 Browse Search
Winfield S. Hancock 321 3 Browse Search
Philip H. Sheridan 313 7 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 278 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

Found 83 total hits in 29 results.

1 2 3
Bethany (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
ting-point, and on the following night it encamped at Stubb's Farm, fourteen miles south from Ripley. At 5 o'clock on the morning of June 10th Waring's brigade, in advance, moved southward in the direction of Brice's plantation, followed by Winslow's brigade, the infantry, and the train, the latter guarded by the brigade of colored troops. The advance found the fences down, as if for an engagement, and two small bridges over the road taken up. About half-past 9 o'clock it reached Brice's Cross-roads, about eleven miles from Stubb's Farm. [See map, p. 414.] The road on which the command was marching ran nearly north and south, and about a mile and a half north of the cross-roads it passed through a wooded bottom and over a swampy piece of ground and took somewhat the character of a causeway, in length nearly three-quarters of a mile. After passing this, and for about a third of a mile, the ground rose somewhat, so that at the cross-roads it was perhaps twenty feet above the c
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
neral Sherman ordered an expedition from Memphis to defeat Forrest's cavalry, then in northern Mississippi, and thereby prevent its descent upon his line of advance. Accordingly, on the 1st of June, a small but well-organized force began its march from White's Station, near Memphis. On the following day General Samuel D. Sturgis was placed in command. Some weeks earlier he had commanded an expedition sent out from Memphis to intercept Forrest on his march southward after his capture of Fort Pillow and the massacre of its garrison, but had been unable to do so. On the 8th of June, before the enemy had been met, Sturgis, although he had supplies sufficient for eleven days, desired to give up the expedition, but was dissuaded. The cavalry was commanded by General B. H. Grierson, and consisted of two brigades: Waring's, 1600 men, two rifled guns, and four small howitzers, and Winslow's, 1800 men and a light battery. There were three brigades of infantry, two white and one colored.
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
the troops that had been longer in action. This line stayed the pursuit for but a space and then became a part of the retreating force. Through the hours of the late afternoon and all through the night the beaten men kept on their way, reaching Ripley, 24 miles from the field, by early morning of June 11th. During the retreat the enemy had captured 14 pieces of artillery, the entire train of 250 wagons, with 10 days rations and a large supply of ammunition, and over 1500 prisoners. At Ripley an attempt was made to form the command gathered there into companies and regiments, but the enemy appeared on two sides and were checked only until the retreat could be resumed. It continued via Collierville to Memphis. The bitter humiliation of this disaster rankles after a quarter of a century. Our loss in killed and wounded was 23 officers and 594 men. The captured or missing amounted to 52 officers and 1571 men, making a total loss of 2240. The enemy may have numbered more than 35
White's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
Forrest's defeat of Sturgis at Brice's cross-roads (June 10th, 1864). by E. Hunn Hanson, Adjutant, 4TH Missouri cavalry, U. S. V., A. D. C. Waring's Brigade. In May, 1864, in order to protect his long line of communication, General Sherman ordered an expedition from Memphis to defeat Forrest's cavalry, then in northern Mississippi, and thereby prevent its descent upon his line of advance. Accordingly, on the 1st of June, a small but well-organized force began its march from White's Station, near Memphis. On the following day General Samuel D. Sturgis was placed in command. Some weeks earlier he had commanded an expedition sent out from Memphis to intercept Forrest on his march southward after his capture of Fort Pillow and the massacre of its garrison, but had been unable to do so. On the 8th of June, before the enemy had been met, Sturgis, although he had supplies sufficient for eleven days, desired to give up the expedition, but was dissuaded. The cavalry was commanded by
Ripley (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
s commanded by Colonel W. L. McMillen. The expedition had a new and complete supply train with eighteen days rations. Adding regimental wagons, there were in all 250, exclusive of ambulances and medical wagons. June 8th the command reached Ripley, about eighty miles from its starting-point, and on the following night it encamped at Stubb's Farm, fourteen miles south from Ripley. At 5 o'clock on the morning of June 10th Waring's brigade, in advance, moved southward in the direction of Ripley. At 5 o'clock on the morning of June 10th Waring's brigade, in advance, moved southward in the direction of Brice's plantation, followed by Winslow's brigade, the infantry, and the train, the latter guarded by the brigade of colored troops. The advance found the fences down, as if for an engagement, and two small bridges over the road taken up. About half-past 9 o'clock it reached Brice's Cross-roads, about eleven miles from Stubb's Farm. [See map, p. 414.] The road on which the command was marching ran nearly north and south, and about a mile and a half north of the cross-roads it passed through
Guntown (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
nd one each on the roads to the west and to the east; the latter led in the direction of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, distant about six miles, at which point was Guntown — a station and small village. The last-mentioned squadron, after going about a mile, commenced to skirmish with a small mounted force, some of which dismounted ess than three hundred, moved against the extreme left of Waring's brigade, but was easily repulsed. An officer who rode with the squadron sent eastward on the Guntown road had remarked as it emerged from the timber, and about a mile to the northward, a road which seemed to lead to the right and rear of the enemy's position. Thed more than 3500 or 4000, but it must be reluctantly confessed that not more than this number is believed to have been in action. If there was, during the war, another engagement like this, it is not known to the writer; and in its immediate results there was no success among the many won by Forrest comparable to that of Guntown
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
Forrest's defeat of Sturgis at Brice's cross-roads (June 10th, 1864). by E. Hunn Hanson, Adjutant, 4TH Missouri cavalry, U. S. V., A. D. C. Waring's Brigade. In May, 1864, in order to protect his long line of communication, General Sherman ordered an expedition from Memphis to defeat Forrest's cavalry, then in northern Mississippi, and thereby prevent its descent upon his line of advance. Accordingly, on the 1st of June, a small but well-organized force began its march from White's Station, near Memphis. On the following day General Samuel D. Sturgis was placed in command. Some weeks earlier he had commanded an expedition sent out from Memphis to intercept Forrest on his march southward after his capture of Fort Pillow and the massacre of its garrison, but had been unable to do so. On the 8th of June, before the enemy had been met, Sturgis, although he had supplies sufficient for eleven days, desired to give up the expedition, but was dissuaded. The cavalry was commanded by
Collierville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.61
e beaten men kept on their way, reaching Ripley, 24 miles from the field, by early morning of June 11th. During the retreat the enemy had captured 14 pieces of artillery, the entire train of 250 wagons, with 10 days rations and a large supply of ammunition, and over 1500 prisoners. At Ripley an attempt was made to form the command gathered there into companies and regiments, but the enemy appeared on two sides and were checked only until the retreat could be resumed. It continued via Collierville to Memphis. The bitter humiliation of this disaster rankles after a quarter of a century. Our loss in killed and wounded was 23 officers and 594 men. The captured or missing amounted to 52 officers and 1571 men, making a total loss of 2240. The enemy may have numbered more than 3500 or 4000, but it must be reluctantly confessed that not more than this number is believed to have been in action. If there was, during the war, another engagement like this, it is not known to the writer;
W. L. McMillen (search for this): chapter 8.61
eir artillery got with precision the range of the cross-roads. At first sullenly, and then rapidly, the whole line fell back to the cross-roads, and with cavalry, ambulances, artillery, and wagons of the train began a disordered retreat along the causeway. The enemy followed with eagerness, and utter disorganization succeeded disorder as piece after piece of artillery became the spoil of the fast-pursuing enemy, some of which was turned upon the huddled mass of fleeing men. Sturgis and McMillen made strenuous efforts to form a line some two miles northward of the lost field with the colored brigade and a part of the troops that had been longer in action. This line stayed the pursuit for but a space and then became a part of the retreating force. Through the hours of the late afternoon and all through the night the beaten men kept on their way, reaching Ripley, 24 miles from the field, by early morning of June 11th. During the retreat the enemy had captured 14 pieces of artiller
William L. McMillen (search for this): chapter 8.61
een met, Sturgis, although he had supplies sufficient for eleven days, desired to give up the expedition, but was dissuaded. The cavalry was commanded by General B. H. Grierson, and consisted of two brigades: Waring's, 1600 men, two rifled guns, and four small howitzers, and Winslow's, 1800 men and a light battery. There were three brigades of infantry, two white and one colored. In all, over five thousand men with two 6-gun batteries. The whole, as a division, was commanded by Colonel W. L. McMillen. The expedition had a new and complete supply train with eighteen days rations. Adding regimental wagons, there were in all 250, exclusive of ambulances and medical wagons. June 8th the command reached Ripley, about eighty miles from its starting-point, and on the following night it encamped at Stubb's Farm, fourteen miles south from Ripley. At 5 o'clock on the morning of June 10th Waring's brigade, in advance, moved southward in the direction of Brice's plantation, follow
1 2 3