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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1..

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Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1
Benjamin F. Hallet, of Boston. These embodied the substance of resolutions on the subject of Slavery, drawn up by Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts (afterwards a major-general in the armies of the Republic), and adopted by the Democratic Convente Democratic party throughout the Union, as a true exposition of their principles and policy. With this understanding, Mr. Butler, now a member of the Committee on Resolutions sitting in Masonic Hall, on that warm April evening in 1860, proposed as as Personal Liberty Laws, as hostile in character, subversive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effects. Mr. Butler was opposed to making even this concession, and adhered to his proposition for a simple affirmance of the Cincinnati pl, drawn by H. B. Payne, of Ohio, and a resolution for the affirmance of the Cincinnati platform without alteration, by B. F. Butler. Mr. Avery opened debate on the subject, by frankly assuring the Convention that if the doctrine of Popular Soverei
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1
e final vote of the Convention on the resolutions was awaited with the most lively interest. The hour for that decision at length arrived. It was on the morning of the 30th. April, 1860. The Hall was densely crowded. A vote was first taken on Butler's resolution. It was rejected by a decisive majority. The minority report — the Douglas platform — which had been slightly modified, was now offered by B. M. Samuels, of Iowa. It was adopted by a handsome majority. In the Convention now, as iunity of the Democratic party. On the following morning, their hopes were utterly blasted when Mr. Cushing, the President of the Convention, and a majority of the Massachusetts delegation, also withdrew. We put our withdrawal before you, said Mr. Butler, of that delegation, upon the simple ground, among others, that there has been a withdrawal, in part, of a majority of the States, and, further (and that, perhaps, more personal to myself), upon the ground that I will not sit in a Convention wh
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 1
n A. Douglas for the Presidency, 27. nomination of John C. Breckinridge for the Presidency, 28. National constitutional Un young and gallant son of the South. He then named John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, as a nominee for the Presidency. MMr. Breckinridge was then Vice-president of the United States under President Buchanan, and subsequent events show that he waent applause followed. A vote by States was taken, and Breckinridge received eighty-one ballots against twenty-four for Dane latter candidate was withdrawn, and the nomination of Breckinridge was declared. Joseph Lane, of Oregon, was nominated fong candidates of that party (Stephen A. Douglas and John C. Breckinridge) went into the canvass with great bitterness of feet would be imperiled by the election of either Douglas, Breckinridge, or the nominee of the Republican party, whoever he migarer. 2. The wing of the Democratic party led by John C. Breckinridge, who declared that no power existed that might lawf
ber, 1860. The seceding delegates partially organized a convention at St. Andrew's Hall, on the evening after their withdrawal from the regular body. On the following day, at noon, they assembled at Military Hall, when they chose James A. Bayard, of Delaware, to be their president. They declared themselves, by resolution offered by Mr. Yancey, to be entitled to the style of the Constitutional Convention, and sneeringly called those whom they had abandoned, the Rump Convention. On the second day of their session they met in the Theater. This was the fourth place in which the conspirators met in the course of forty-eight hours. All of these. public buildings are now (1865) in ruins. The dress circle was crowded with the women of Charleston. They had hitherto filled the galleries of the Institute Hall. Their sympathies were with the seceders, and they now followed them. President Bayard, a dignified, courtly gentleman, sat near the foot-lights of the stage. The painted s
April 23rd (search for this): chapter 1
ty moved first. Its representatives were summoned to assemble in Charleston, a pleasant city of forty thousand inhabitants, and a considerable commercial mart. It is spread over the point of a low sandy cape, at the confluence of the waters of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, on the seacoast of South Carolina, and far away from the centers of population and the great forces of the Republic. The delegates, almost six hundred in number, and representing thirty-two States, assembled on the 23d of April 1860. in the great hall of the South Carolina Institute, This building, in which the famous South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was signee (it was adopted in St. Andrew's Hall), late in December, 1860, was destroyed by fire in December, 1861. St. Andrew's Hall, in which the conspirators against the Republic who seceded from the Democratic Convention now under consideration assembled, and in which the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was adopted by the unanimous voice of a Conve
four for Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York. The latter candidate was withdrawn, and the nomination of Breckinridge was declared. Joseph Lane, of Oregon, was nominated for the Vice-presidency; and after a session of only a few hours, the business was ended and the Convention adjourned. June 23, 1860. The South Carolina delegation, who remained in Richmond, formally assembled at Metropolitan Hall on the 21st, according to appointment, and adjourned from day to day until the evening of the 26th, when Mr. Yancey and many others arrived from Baltimore. The Convention then organized for business, which was soon dispatched. The platform and candidates offered to the party by the seceders' Convention at Baltimore were adopted by unanimous vote, with great cheering by the delegates and the crowd who filled the galleries. Then the Convention adjourned. So ended the Conventions of the divided Democratic party, in the early summer-time of 1860. The respective friends of the opposing c
June 25th (search for this): chapter 1
in favor of Mr. Douglas; and of one hundred and ninety-four and a half votes cast, on the second ballot, he received one hundred and eighty-one and a half, when he was declared duly nominated for the Presidency. James Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, was nominated for Vice-president. Two days afterward, Fitzpatrick declined the nomination, when the National Committee substituted Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia. The National Committee assembled at the National Hotel, in Washington City, on the 25th of June. In it all the States were represented, excepting Delaware, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Oregon. On the evening of the 23d, the Convention made a final adjournment. The Maryland Institute in 1860. The seceders, new and old assembled at noon on Saturday, the 23d, in the Maryland Institute Hall, situate on Baltimore Street and Marsh Market Space, a room more than three hundred feet in length and seventy in breadth, with a gallery extending entirely around. It was capable of sea
federacy the real object. The next pretext will be the Negro or Slavery, question. The seceders were confident that their work had been effectually performed, and their desired object attained. They well knew that their class held such absolute political control in the Slave-labor States, that the great mass of their constituency would applaud their action and follow their lead. Reposing upon this knowledge, they could afford to wait for further developments; so, on the evening of the 3d of May, 1860. they adjourned to meet in the city of Richmond, in Virginia, on the second Monday of June following, for further action. To that Convention they invited the Democracy of the country who might sympathize with their movement and their platform to send representatives. The seceders reassembled in Metropolitan Hall (on Franklin Street, near Governor), in Richmond, at the appointed time, namely, on Monday, the 11th day of June. In the mean time some of the leading Southern Congress
December, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 1
ape, at the confluence of the waters of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, on the seacoast of South Carolina, and far away from the centers of population and the great forces of the Republic. The delegates, almost six hundred in number, and representing thirty-two States, assembled on the 23d of April 1860. in the great hall of the South Carolina Institute, This building, in which the famous South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was signee (it was adopted in St. Andrew's Hall), late in December, 1860, was destroyed by fire in December, 1861. St. Andrew's Hall, in which the conspirators against the Republic who seceded from the Democratic Convention now under consideration assembled, and in which the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was adopted by the unanimous voice of a Convention, was destroyed at the same time. Everything about the site of these buildings, made in famous in history because of the wicked acts performed in them, yet (1865) exhibits a ghastly picture of desolat
April 30th (search for this): chapter 1
innati platform without alteration, by B. F. Butler. Mr. Avery opened debate on the subject, by frankly assuring the Convention that if the doctrine of Popular Sovereignty should be adopted as the doctrine of the Democratic party, the members of the Convention from the Slave-labor States, and their constituents, would consider it as dangerous and subversive of their rights, as the adoption of the principle of Congressional interference or prohibition. From that time until Monday, the 30th of April, 1860. the debate was continued, in the midst of much confusion and disorder in the Convention. The streets of Charleston in the pleasant evenings resounded with music, the speeches of politicians, and the huzzas of the multitude. Society there was in a bubble of excitement, and the final vote of the Convention on the resolutions was awaited with the most lively interest. The hour for that decision at length arrived. It was on the morning of the 30th. April, 1860. The Hall was dens
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