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ourtesy of the Convention by talking of the horrors of disunion, was asking forgiveness in an abject manners, Halstead's History of the National Political Conventions in 1860, page 158. the Convention adjourned, to meet at the same place on the 21st of the month. June, 1860. Most of the delegates then hastened to Baltimore, pursuant to the plan of the Congressional conspirators, while the South Carolina delegation, who assumed to be special managers of the treasonable drama, remained in Richated for the Vice-presidency; and after a session of only a few hours, the business was ended and the Convention adjourned. June 23, 1860. The South Carolina delegation, who remained in Richmond, formally assembled at Metropolitan Hall on the 21st, according to appointment, and adjourned from day to day until the evening of the 26th, when Mr. Yancey and many others arrived from Baltimore. The Convention then organized for business, which was soon dispatched. The platform and candidates of
December, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
he Ashley and Cooper Rivers, on the seacoast of South Carolina, and far away from the centers of population and the great forces of the Republic. The delegates, almost six hundred in number, and representing thirty-two States, assembled on the 23d of April 1860. in the great hall of the South Carolina Institute, This building, in which the famous South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was signee (it was adopted in St. Andrew's Hall), late in December, 1860, was destroyed by fire in December, 1861. St. Andrew's Hall, in which the conspirators against the Republic who seceded from the Democratic Convention now under consideration assembled, and in which the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was adopted by the unanimous voice of a Convention, was destroyed at the same time. Everything about the site of these buildings, made in famous in history because of the wicked acts performed in them, yet (1865) exhibits a ghastly picture of desolation. on Meeting Street, in which three th
Stephen A. Douglas (search for this): chapter 1
. another Secession, 26. nomination of Stephen A. Douglas for the Presidency, 27. nomination of J determined to prevent the nomination of Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois (an able statesman, and effendred votes were necessary to a choice. Stephen A. Douglas led off with at least fifty less than thntion, if possible defeat the nomination of Mr. Douglas, and thus, as they said, with well-feigned majority report recommending the admission of Douglas delegates (in place of seceders) from Louisiaplaces of most of the seceders were filled by Douglas men. Again there was rebellion against the fates from the Free-labor States, in favor of Mr. Douglas; and of one hundred and ninety-four and a hf the opposing candidates of that party (Stephen A. Douglas and John C. Breckinridge) went into the would be imperiled by the election of either Douglas, Breckinridge, or the nominee of the Republic The wing of the Democratic party led by Stephen A. Douglas, whose platform of principles assumed no
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 1
were led by such men as John Slidell, of Louisiana, and William L. Yancey, of Alabama, then, and long before, arch-conspirators against the life of the Republic. In June, 1856, a National Democratic Convention was held at Cincinnati, when James Buchanan was nominated for President of the United States. A platform was then framed, composed of many resolutions and involved declarations of principles, drawn by the hand of Benjamin F. Hallet, of Boston. These embodied the substance of resolutione standing pre-eminently before this country — a young and gallant son of the South. He then named John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, as a nominee for the Presidency. Mr. Breckinridge was then Vice-president of the United States under President Buchanan, and subsequent events show that he was a co-worker with Davis and others against the Government. He joined the insurgents, and, during a portion of the civil war that ensued, he was the socalled Secretary of War of Jefferson Davis. Veheme
Hannibal Hamlin (search for this): chapter 1
s of the Convention. Then that body proceeded to the choice of a Presidential candidate, and on the third ballot Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, was nominated. The announcement of the result caused the most uproarious applause; and, from the common center at Chicago, the electric messengers flew with the intelligence, almost as quick as thought, to every part of the vast Republic, eastward of the Rocky Mountains, before sunset. The Convention took a recess, and in the evening nominated Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, for Vice-president. Their labors were now done, and, after a brief speech by their presiding officer, the Convention adjourned, with nine cheers for the ticket. Mr. Lincoln, the nominee, was at his home in Springfield, Illinois, at this time. He had been in the telegraph-office during the first and second ballotings, when he left, went to the office of the State Journal, and was conversing with friends when the third balloting occurred. The result was known at Springfie
Robert Toombs (search for this): chapter 1
to meet in the city of Richmond, in Virginia, on the second Monday of June following, for further action. To that Convention they invited the Democracy of the country who might sympathize with their movement and their platform to send representatives. The seceders reassembled in Metropolitan Hall (on Franklin Street, near Governor), in Richmond, at the appointed time, namely, on Monday, the 11th day of June. In the mean time some of the leading Southern Congressmen, among whom were Robert Toombs, of Georgia, and other conspirators, had issued an address from Washington City, urging that the Richmond Convention should refrain from all important action, and adjourn to Baltimore, and there, re-entering the regular Convention, if possible defeat the nomination of Mr. Douglas, and thus, as they said, with well-feigned honesty of expression, make a final effort to preserve the harmony and unity of the Democratic party The consequence was, that the Convention at Richmond was respectabl
Edwin D. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1
seven thousand dollars, for the special use of the Convention. It was tastefully decorated within, and was spacious enough to hold ten thousand persons. A rustic seat, made of a huge knot of a tree, was prepared for the use of the President of the Convention; and everything about the affair was rough and President's chair. rural in appearance. The Convention met in the Wigwam, on the 16th day of May. Not more than one-third of the vast gathering of people could enter the building. E. D. Morgan, of New York, Chairman of the National Republican Executive Committee, called the Convention to order, and David Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, was chosen temporary chairman. In due time, George Ashmun, of Massachusetts, was chosen permanent President. It was a wise choice. His voice could be heard above any clamor that might be raised in the assembly, and he was remarkable for coolness, clearness of judgment, and executive ability. He was presented with a gavel made of a piece of the oak t
David Tod (search for this): chapter 1
a majority of the Massachusetts delegation, also withdrew. We put our withdrawal before you, said Mr. Butler, of that delegation, upon the simple ground, among others, that there has been a withdrawal, in part, of a majority of the States, and, further (and that, perhaps, more personal to myself), upon the ground that I will not sit in a Convention where the African Slave-trade — which is piracy by the laws of my country — is approvingly advocated. On the retirement of Mr. Cushing, Governor David Tod, of Ohio, one of the vice-presidents, took the chair, and the Convention proceeded to ballot for a Presidential candidate. A considerable number of Southern delegates, who were satisfied with the Cincinnati platform, remained in the Convention, and, as their respective States were called, some of them made brief speeches. One of these was Mr. Flournoy, of Arkansas, the temporary Chairman of the Convention at Charleston. I am a Southern man, he said, born and reared amid the institut
Madison S. Perry (search for this): chapter 1
ew York, Chairman of the National Republican Executive Committee, called the Convention to order, and David Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, was chosen temporary chairman. In due time, George Ashmun, of Massachusetts, was chosen permanent President. It was a wise choice. His voice could be heard above any clamor that might be raised in the assembly, and he was remarkable for coolness, clearness of judgment, and executive ability. He was presented with a gavel made of a piece of the oak timber of Perry's flag-ship, Lawrence; and with this emblem of authority, inscribed with the words, Don't give up the ship! he called the Convention to order, and invited the delegates to business. A committee on resolutions, composed of one delegate from each State represented, was appointed, and on the following morning May 17, 1860. it submitted to the Convention a platform of principles, in the form of seventeen resolutions. After affirming that the maintenance of the principles promulgated in the
Norman J. Hall (search for this): chapter 1
th place in which the conspirators met in the course of forty-eight hours. All of these. public buildings are now (1865) in ruins. The dress circle was crowded with the women of Charleston. They had hitherto filled the galleries of the Institute Hall. Their sympathies were with the seceders, and they now followed them. President Bayard, a dignified, courtly gentleman, sat near the foot-lights of the stage. The painted scene behind him was that of the Borgia Palace, History of the Natiolaware, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Oregon. On the evening of the 23d, the Convention made a final adjournment. The Maryland Institute in 1860. The seceders, new and old assembled at noon on Saturday, the 23d, in the Maryland Institute Hall, situate on Baltimore Street and Marsh Market Space, a room more than three hundred feet in length and seventy in breadth, with a gallery extending entirely around. It was capable of seating five thousand people; and it was almost full when the C
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