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Erasmus W. Cooper (search for this): chapter 25
tone Bridge; and Early's brigade, composed of the Seventh and Twenty-fourth Virginia, and Seventh Louisiana Volunteers, with three rifled cannon of Walton's battery, held a position in the rear of Ewell's brigade.--Beauregard's Report to Adjutant-General Cooper. The run formed an admirable line of defense. Its steep, rocky, and wooded banks, and its deep bed, formed an almost impassable barrier to troops, excepting at the fords, which were a mile or two apart. They had reserves at Camp Pickens about equal, that of McDowell being seventy-three, and of Beauregard, seventy. Report of Colonel Richardson to General Tyler, July 19, 1861; Report of General Tyler to General McDowell, July 27, 1861; Report of General Beauregard to Adjutant-General Cooper, August, 1861; The C. S. A. and The Battle of Bull's Run: a Letter to an English Friend: by Major J. G. Barnard, who was with Tyler's division. The Nationals lost nineteen killed, thirty-eight wounded, and twenty-six missing; the Confed
Frederick F. Prime (search for this): chapter 25
no adequate conception of the grave duties laid upon it. The composition of this first great American army was as follows:-- McDowell's Staff.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General; Aids-de-camp--First Lieutenant Henry W. Kingsbury, Fifth United States Artillery, and Majors Clarence S. Brown and James S. Wadsworth, New York State Artillery; Acting Inspector-General--Major William H. Wood, Seventeenth United States Infantry; Engineers-Major John G. Barnard and First Lieutenant Frederick F. Prime; Topographical Engineers--Captain Amiel W. Whipple, First Lieutenant Henry L. Abbot, and Second Lieutenant Haldimand S Putnam; Quartermaster's Department-Captain O. H. Tillinghast; Commissary of Subsistence-Horace F. Clark; Surgeon — William S; King; Assistant Surgeon--David L. Magruder. First Division.--General Tyler. Four brigades. The First Brigade, commanded by Colonel Erasmus D. Keyes, of the Eleventh United States Infantry, was composed of the First, Second, and Thir
ows:-- McDowell's Staff.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General; Aids-de-camp--First Lieutenant Henry W. Kingsbury, Fifth United States Artillery, and Majors Clarence S. Brown and James S. Wadsworth, New York State Artillery; Acting Inspector-General--Major William H. Wood, Seventeenth United States Infantry; Engineers-Major John G. Barnard and First Lieutenant Frederick F. Prime; Topographical Engineers--Captain Amiel W. Whipple, First Lieutenant Henry L. Abbot, and Second Lieutenant Haldimand S Putnam; Quartermaster's Department-Captain O. H. Tillinghast; Commissary of Subsistence-Horace F. Clark; Surgeon — William S; King; Assistant Surgeon--David L. Magruder. First Division.--General Tyler. Four brigades. The First Brigade, commanded by Colonel Erasmus D. Keyes, of the Eleventh United States Infantry, was composed of the First, Second, and Third Regiments of Connecticut Volunteers, the Fourth Maine Volunteers, Captain Varian's Now York Battery, and Company B of t
David L. Magruder (search for this): chapter 25
ence S. Brown and James S. Wadsworth, New York State Artillery; Acting Inspector-General--Major William H. Wood, Seventeenth United States Infantry; Engineers-Major John G. Barnard and First Lieutenant Frederick F. Prime; Topographical Engineers--Captain Amiel W. Whipple, First Lieutenant Henry L. Abbot, and Second Lieutenant Haldimand S Putnam; Quartermaster's Department-Captain O. H. Tillinghast; Commissary of Subsistence-Horace F. Clark; Surgeon — William S; King; Assistant Surgeon--David L. Magruder. First Division.--General Tyler. Four brigades. The First Brigade, commanded by Colonel Erasmus D. Keyes, of the Eleventh United States Infantry, was composed of the First, Second, and Third Regiments of Connecticut Volunteers, the Fourth Maine Volunteers, Captain Varian's Now York Battery, and Company B of the Second United States Cavalry. The Second Brigade, under Brigadier-Genera, R. C. Schenck, consisted of the First and Second Ohio Volunteers, the Second New York Volunteers,
rst United States Artillery The Second Brigade, led by Colonel 0. B. Wilcox, of the Michigan Volunteers, was composed of the First Michigan Vand make the direct attack on Centreville. The brigades of Bee and Wilcox, with Stuart's cavalry (among whom was a dashing corps known as thecomplish it, five brigades, namely, Porter's, Howard's, Franklin's, Wilcox's, and Sherman's, with the batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arno Colburn's United States Cavalry, and led by Colonel J. H. Ward, of Wilcox's brigade, they attacked the Confederate horsemen and dispersed theish Regiment). Among the wounded were Colonels Hunter, Heintzelman, Wilcox, Gilman, Martin, Wood, H. W. Slocum, Farnham, and Corcoran, and Major James D. Potter. Wilcox, Corcoran, and Potter, were made prisoners. Such was the immediate and most dreadful result of this first greaPennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Colonel Gallup. Generals Heintzelman, Wilcox, and others, who fought in the battle, were present at the dedicati
A. G. Brackett (search for this): chapter 25
o'clock, when the sun had been shining on the Stone Bridge nearly two hours, before Tyler was ready to open fire on the Confederates there; and the forest road was so rough and obscure, and the distance so much greater than was expected, that Hunter and Heintzelman were. four hours behind the appointed time, when they crossed Bull's Run at and near Sudley's Ford. McDowell had become exceedingly impatient of delay, and at length he mounted his horse, and with his escort, composed of Captain A. G. Brackett's company of United States Cavalry, he rode forward, and overtook and passed Hunter and Heintzelman. McDowell and his attendants were the first in the open fields that became a battle-ground, and were the targets for the first bullets fired by the Confederates. Tyler placed Schenck's brigade on the left of the turnpike, in a position that menaced the Confederate battery at the Stone Bridge, and Sherman's was posted on the right, to be in a position to sustain Schenck or to cross
John Slocum (search for this): chapter 25
sted half an hour at the ford, and, being well supplied with water, was quite refreshed. The Second Rhode Island, Colonel John Slocum, led. As they approached the open fields he threw out skirmishers, and very soon his regiment, with Marston's Secotil that officer was wounded, when he devoted himself to having the wounded removed, and in attention to their wants. Colonel Slocum, of the Second Rhode Island, fell mortally wounded soon afterward, and his Major, Sullivan Ballou, had his. leg crush there soon afterward died, at the age of thirty-two years. He was buried near the church. In March, 1862, the bodies of Slocum, Ballou, and Captain Tower, of the same regiment (the latter was killed at the beginning of the battle), were disinterred Among the killed of the National Army were Colonel James Cameron, of the Seventy-ninth New York (Highlanders); Colonel John Slocum and Major Ballou, of the Second Rhode Island; and Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty, of the New York Sixty-ninth (Corcor
ion of the Carter family, with the battery behind a house, his right covered by a grove, and his left sheltered by shrubbery along the road. It was half-past 10 before the head of Hunter's column, led by Burnside, came in sight of Evans. The division had rested half an hour at the ford, and, being well supplied with water, was quite refreshed. The Second Rhode Island, Colonel John Slocum, led. As they approached the open fields he threw out skirmishers, and very soon his regiment, with Marston's Second New Hampshire, and Martin's Seventy-first New York, with Griffin's battery, and Major Reynolds's Marine Artillery, of Rhode Island, opened the battle. Evans was soon so hard pressed that his line was beginning to waver, when General Bee, who had advanced with the detachments of his own and Bartow's Georgia brigade, and Imboden's battery, to the northern verge of the plateau, just described, perceiving the peril, hurried down the slope, crossed Young's Branch valley, and gave the C
Sullivan Ballou (search for this): chapter 25
ion to their wants. Colonel Slocum, of the Second Rhode Island, fell mortally wounded soon afterward, and his Major, Sullivan Ballou, had his. leg crushed by a cannon-ball that killed his horse. Major Ballou was taken to Sudley Church, which was Major Ballou was taken to Sudley Church, which was used as a hospital, and there soon afterward died, at the age of thirty-two years. He was buried near the church. In March, 1862, the bodies of Slocum, Ballou, and Captain Tower, of the same regiment (the latter was killed at the beginning of the baBallou, and Captain Tower, of the same regiment (the latter was killed at the beginning of the battle), were disinterred and conveyed to Rhode Island. When their remains reached New York, General Sandford detailed the Sixty-ninth, Seventy-first, and Thirty-seventh New York Regiments to act as an escort. Porter was next in rank to Hunter, but hi of the National Army were Colonel James Cameron, of the Seventy-ninth New York (Highlanders); Colonel John Slocum and Major Ballou, of the Second Rhode Island; and Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty, of the New York Sixty-ninth (Corcoran's Irish Regiment).
harge upon the Confederate left, but without success. This march, which led Keyes a mile or more from the hottest of the battle on the western edge of the plateau, caused the Confederates to retire from the Stone Bridge, and gave Captain Alexander the opportunity to make a passage through the abatis, as we have observed. The struggle for the possession of the plateau, in the mean time, had been fearful. When the Zouaves gave way,. Heintzelman ordered up the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Gorman, to the support of the batteries, which were directed to take position on the extreme right. The infantry and the artillery did so at the double quick, when they found themselves suddenly confronted by troops less than a hundred feet from them. The Nationals were embarrassed, for an instant, by doubt whether they were friends or foes. Heintzelman himself was uncertain, and he rode in between the two lines. The problem was solved a moment afterward, when the colors of each were seen.