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The Nationals were embarrassed, for an instant, by doubt whether they were friends or foes. Heintzelman himself was uncertain, and he rode in between the two lines. The problem was solved a moment afterward, when the colors of each were seen. .Then a blaze of fire flashed from each line, and terrible slaughter ensued. Both batteries were disabled by the first volley, for it prostrated a greater portion of the cannoneers and one-half of the horses. Captain Ricketts was wounded, and Lieutenant D. Ramsay was killed. The Confederates were there in overwhelming numbers. The Minnesota regiment was compelled to retire. The First Michigan and Fourteenth New York were likewise repulsed. The Confederates, too, were often pushed back, and both sides fought with the greatest bravery. Stonewall Jackson had dashed forward and attempted to carry off the guns, but was driven back by the Thirty-eighth New York and the. Zouaves, and the latter dragged three of Ricketts' pieces away, but not far
re there in much greater force than was expected. The gallant Cameron was killed, The biographer of Colonel Cameron says: No mortal man could stand the fearful storm that swept them. As they fell back, Cameron again and again led them up, his Scots, follow me! ringing above the din of battle, till at last Wade Hampton, who had marked his gallant bearing, and fired rifle after rifle at him, as his men handed them up, accomplished his murderous purpose. He was buried near the house of Mr. Dogan. and for the third time they were repulsed. Then Corcoran led his Sixty-ninth to the charge, and the roar of cannon and musketry was incessant. The regiment received and repelled a furious charge of the Black Horse Cavalry, whose ranks were terribly shattered by the murderous fire of the Irish and some Zouaves who had joined them.. They held their position for some time, but were compelled at length to give way before fresh troops in overwhelming numbers, who were pouring in and turning
James D. Potter (search for this): chapter 25
the Second Rhode Island; and Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty, of the New York Sixty-ninth (Corcoran's Irish Regiment). Among the wounded were Colonels Hunter, Heintzelman, Wilcox, Gilman, Martin, Wood, H. W. Slocum, Farnham, and Corcoran, and Major James D. Potter. Wilcox, Corcoran, and Potter, were made prisoners. Such was the immediate and most dreadful result of this first great conflict of the Civil War, known as the battle of Bull's Run. The Confederate commanders, and the writers in tPotter, were made prisoners. Such was the immediate and most dreadful result of this first great conflict of the Civil War, known as the battle of Bull's Run. The Confederate commanders, and the writers in their interest, call it the battle of Manassas. It was fought much nearer Bull's Run than Manassas, and the title above given seems the most correct. About four years after the battle, when the war had ceased, National soldiers erected on the spot where the conflict raged most fiercely, a very few yards southward from the site of Mrs. Henry's House, a substantial monument of stone, in commemoration of their compatriots who fell there. A picture of it is given on the preceding page. It is made
James McCallom (search for this): chapter 25
including the base, and it stands upon an elevated mound. On each corner of the base is a block of sandstone, on which rest elongated conical 100-pounder shells, the cone pointing upward. The top of the shaft is also surmounted by one. On one side of the monument are these words:--in memory of the patriots who fell at Bull Run, July 21, 1861. On the other side:--erected June 10, 1865. It was constructed by the officers and soldiers of the Sixteenth Massachusetts Light Battery, Lieutenant James McCallom (who conceived the idea), and the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Colonel Gallup. Generals Heintzelman, Wilcox, and others, who fought in the battle, were present at the dedication of the monument at the date above named. The picture is from a photograph by Gardner, of Washington City. A hymn, written for the occasion by the Rev. John Pierpont, then eighty years of age, was sung. The services were opened by Rev. Dr. McMurdy, of Kentucky; and several officers made speeches. W
s of the Sixteenth Massachusetts Light Battery, Lieutenant James McCallom (who conceived the idea), and the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Colonel Gallup. Generals Heintzelman, Wilcox, and others, who fought in the battle, were present at the dedication of the monument at the date above named. The picture is from a photograph by Gardner, of Washington City. A hymn, written for the occasion by the Rev. John Pierpont, then eighty years of age, was sung. The services were opened by Rev. Dr. McMurdy, of Kentucky; and several officers made speeches. We shall hereafter observe its effects upon public sentiment — how it increased the arrogance of the conspirators, and the number of their adherents — how it quickened into powerful and practical action the feeling of nationality and intense love for the Union latent in the hearts of all loyal Americans — how it produced another and more important uprising of the faithful People in defense of the Republic, and how it made the enemies of <
June 10th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 25
eding page. It is made of ordinary sandstone, found near Manassas Junction. Its total hight is twenty-seven feet, including the base, and it stands upon an elevated mound. On each corner of the base is a block of sandstone, on which rest elongated conical 100-pounder shells, the cone pointing upward. The top of the shaft is also surmounted by one. On one side of the monument are these words:--in memory of the patriots who fell at Bull Run, July 21, 1861. On the other side:--erected June 10, 1865. It was constructed by the officers and soldiers of the Sixteenth Massachusetts Light Battery, Lieutenant James McCallom (who conceived the idea), and the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Colonel Gallup. Generals Heintzelman, Wilcox, and others, who fought in the battle, were present at the dedication of the monument at the date above named. The picture is from a photograph by Gardner, of Washington City. A hymn, written for the occasion by the Rev. John Pierpont, then eighty years
Youngs Branch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ow wooded bottom for half a mile, and then, passing over a gentle hill, crossed, in a hollow beyond, a brook known as Young's Branch. Following the little valley of this brook, the road went up an easy slope to a plain in the direction of Groveton, wo miles from the Stone Bridge, where a road from Sudley's Spring crossed it. Between that road and the Stone Bridge, Young's Branch, bending northward of the turnpike, forms a curve, from the outer edge of which the ground rises gently to the northwslope was the scene of the earliest sharp conflict on the eventful 21st of July. From the inner edge of the curve of Young's Branch, southward, the ground rises quite abruptly to an altitude of about a hundred feet, and spreads out into a plateau, avans was posting his troops in a commanding position on the north side of the Warrenton turnpike, within the curve of Young's Branch. The re-enforcements ordered by Johnston had not reached him when he commenced this movement. He sent word to Gener
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
zy's Brigade. Johnston received him at The portico with joy, and ordered him to attack the right flank of the Nationals immediately. In doing so he fell, severely wounded, when Colonel Elzy executed the order promptly. Map illustrating the battle of Bull's Run. When Johnson saw his re-enforcements coming, he ordered Colonel Cocke's brigade up from Bull's Run, to join in the action, and within a half an hour the South Carolina regiments of Cash and Kershaw, of Bonham's brigade, with Fisher's North Carolina regiment, were also pressing hard upon the right of the Nationals. With all these re-enforcements, Beauregard's army of twelve regiments, with which he began the battle, had been increased to the number of twenty-five. These were now all concentrating on the right and rear of McDowell's forces. The woods on his flank and rear were soon swarming with Confederates, who were pouring destructive volleys of musketry and cannon-shot upon him. The blow was sudden, unexpected, he
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
command the entire plateau. Ricketts and Griffin were ordered to seize it, and plant their batteries there. The Eleventh New York (Ellsworth's Fire Zouaves), Colonel Farnham, were assigned to their immediate support; and the Twenty-seventh New York, Fifth and Eleventh Massachusetts, the Second Minnesota, and Corcoran's Sixty-ninth New York, were moved up to the left of the batteries. The Artillery and the Zouaves went boldly forward in the face of a severe cannonade, until an ambushed Alabama regiment suddenly came oat from a clump of pines partly on their flank, and poured upon them a terrible shower of bullets. This hot and unexpected attack made the Zouaves, who had never been under fire, recoil, when two companies of the fine corps of Stuart's horsemen, known as the Black Horse Cavalry (Carter's and Hoge's), dashed furiously upon their rear from the woods on the Sudley's Spring Road. A portion of the Zouaves' line now broke in some confusion, and the cavalry went entirely
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
h, dated July 22, 1861. His wish was soon more than satisfied. Just then, a cloud of dust was seen in the direction of the Manassas Gap Railway. Johnston had already been informed that United States troops were on that road. He believed Patterson had outmarched his oncoming Army of the Shenandoah, and with fresh troops would easily gain a victory for the Nationals. The story was untrue. They were Johnston's own troops, about four thousand in number, under General E. Kirby Smith, of Connecticut. They had come down by the Manassas Gap Railway; and when Smith heard the thunder of cannon on his left, he stopped the cars, and leaving them, he hurried across the country with his troops in the direction of the conflict, with three regiments of Elzy's Brigade. Johnston received him at The portico with joy, and ordered him to attack the right flank of the Nationals immediately. In doing so he fell, severely wounded, when Colonel Elzy executed the order promptly. Map illustrating t
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