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Millwood (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
Shenandoah to join that of the Potomac at Manassas at once. Johnston received the dispatch at one o'clock on the morning Joseph E. Johnston. of the 18th. It was necessary to fight and defeat General Patterson or to elude him. The latter was accomplished, and Johnston, with six thousand infantry, reached Manassas Junction at about noon on the 20th. His whole army, excepting about two thousand of his sick and a guard of militia, who had been left at Winchester, had marched by the way of Millwood through Ashby's Gap to Piedmont, See map on page 586. Beauregard sent Colonel Chisholm, one of his aids, to meet Johnston, and suggest the propriety of his sending down a part of his force by the way of Aldie, to fall upon the flank and rear of the Nationals at Centreville. Lack of transportation prevented that movement. See Beauregard's Report, August 26, 1861. whence the infantry were conveyed by railway, while the cavalry and artillery, because of a lack of rolling stock This tec
Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
otomac at Manassas at once. Johnston received the dispatch at one o'clock on the morning Joseph E. Johnston. of the 18th. It was necessary to fight and defeat General Patterson or to elude him. The latter was accomplished, and Johnston, with six thousand infantry, reached Manassas Junction at about noon on the 20th. His whole army, excepting about two thousand of his sick and a guard of militia, who had been left at Winchester, had marched by the way of Millwood through Ashby's Gap to Piedmont, See map on page 586. Beauregard sent Colonel Chisholm, one of his aids, to meet Johnston, and suggest the propriety of his sending down a part of his force by the way of Aldie, to fall upon the flank and rear of the Nationals at Centreville. Lack of transportation prevented that movement. See Beauregard's Report, August 26, 1861. whence the infantry were conveyed by railway, while the cavalry and artillery, because of a lack of rolling stock This technical term means the engines an
Stone Bridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
man's brigade, from Tyler's right wing, led by Colonel Corcoran, with his New York Sixty-ninth, sixteen hundred strong. Using a high tree for an observatory, an officer of Tyler's staff had watched the movements of the columns of Hunter and Heintzelman from the moment when they crossed Bull's Run; and when there seemed danger that the tide of battle might be turned against the attacking force of his division, Tyler promptly ordered Sherman to cross just above the Michael Corcoran. Stone Bridge to their assistance. He did so without much molestation, when his advance (the Sixty-ninth) soon encountered some of the Confederates flying before Hunter's forces. Sherman's approach was timely. Those in conflict, having been on their feet most of the time since midnight, and having fought for an hour in the scorching sun, were much exhausted. Sherman's troops were fresh, and the Confederates knew it. Menaced by these on their right, heavily pressed by Burnside and Sykes on their c
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
s strongly intrenched at Winchester, in the Shenandoah Valley; and General Patterson was at Martinsburg, a few miles below him, charged with the duty of keeping Johnston from re-enforcing Beauregard at Bull's Run. The subjoined map indicates the theater of operations on which the four armies were about to perform. Orders for the advance were given on the 15th, July, 1861. and at half-past 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the next day, Tyler's column, forming the right wing, went forward to Vienna, and encamped for the night. At sunrise the next morning, July 17. the whole army moved in four columns. The men were in light marching order, with cooked provisions for three days in their knapsacks. The village of Fairfax Court House was their destination, where, it was expected, the Confederates would offer battle. Beauregard's Headquarters at Manassas. Tyler, with the right wing, moved along the Georgetown Road. Hunter, with the center, advanced by the Leesburg and Centrevil
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ng for information and advice. He had been informed by General Scott on the 12th, July. that Manassas would be attacked on Tuesday, the 16th. On the 13th, he was directed by his Chief to make demonstrations to keep Johnston at Winchester, if he (Patterson) did not feel strong enough to attack him. Patterson made the demonstration, accordingly, on the day when Manassas was to be attacked, and drove Johnston's pickets within their intrenchments. On the following day he moved his army to Charlestown, where he could more, easily re-enforce McDowell, if called to do so; and at the same time he received a dispatch from Scott, July 17. saying--McDowell's first day's work has driven the enemy beyond Fairfax Court House. Tomorrow, probably, the Junction will be carried. Johnston was still at Winchester, with full thirty thousand troops, and Patterson, supposing that the work at Manassas would be completed on the morrow, felt a satisfaction in having accomplished what he was ordered to
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ages. Near there, Daniel Tyler. at Weir's house, at the junction of the Centreville and Union Mill roads, Beauregard had his Headquarters. The Confederates had an outpost, with fortifications, at Centreville, and strong pickets and slight fortifications at Fairfax Court House, a village, ten miles from the main army, in the direction of Washington City. General Johnston, as we have observed, was strongly intrenched at Winchester, in the Shenandoah Valley; and General Patterson was at Martinsburg, a few miles below him, charged with the duty of keeping Johnston from re-enforcing Beauregard at Bull's Run. The subjoined map indicates the theater of operations on which the four armies were about to perform. Orders for the advance were given on the 15th, July, 1861. and at half-past 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the next day, Tyler's column, forming the right wing, went forward to Vienna, and encamped for the night. At sunrise the next morning, July 17. the whole army moved in
National (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
These re-enforcements consisted of two Georgia regiments (Seventh and Eighth), under Bartow, the Fourth Alabama, and some Mississippians, while Imboden's battery, on the plateau, poured a destructive fire upon the Nationals. Burnside called for help; and Colonel Andrew Porter, whose brigade was marching down the Sudley's Spring Road, immediately furnished it, by sending a battalion of regulars Georgia heavy Infantry. under Major Sykes, of the Third Infantry, to his aid. These made the National line firm, and while the battle was raging with equal vigor on both sides, Colonel Hunter was so severely wounded that he was compelled to leave the field. Isaac N. Arnold, a member of the National House of Representatives, was a volunteer aid to Colonel Hunter, and remained on the field until that officer was wounded, when he devoted himself to having the wounded removed, and in attention to their wants. Colonel Slocum, of the Second Rhode Island, fell mortally wounded soon afterward, a
Bull Run Mountains (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
t battery with Company G of the Second United States Artillery. The foregoing was compiled from the General Orders of the Commander-in-chief, dated 8th of July, 1861. commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Daniel Tyler and Theodore Runyon, and Colonels David Hunter, Samuel P. Heintzelman, and Dixon S. Miles. The Confederate force against which this army was to move was distributed along Bull's Run, This is an inconsiderable stream, which rises in the range of hills known as Bull's Run Mountains. See map on page 586. It empties into the Occoquan River about twelve miles from the Potomac. from Union Mill, where the Orange and Alexandria Railway crosses that stream, to the Stone Bridge of the Warrenton Turnpike, the interval being about eight miles. The disposition of the Confederate forces was as follows:-- Ewell's brigade occupied a position near the Union Mill Ford, and was composed of the Fifth and Seventh Alabama, and Fifth Louisiana Volunteers, with four 12-pound h
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
nnoissance to be made on the 19th with the intention of attacking his foe on Saturday, the 20th. But his needful supplies did not arrive until Friday night, and he was compelled to remain at Centreville a day longer than he expected to. On that evening, his army began to melt away. The term of service of the Fourth Pennsylvania and Varian's battery of the New York Eighth expired that day, and neither the persuasions of the Commanding General, nor those of the Secretary of War, who was at Headquarters, could induce them to remain. They turned their faces homeward that evening, and a few hours later they heard the thunders of the battle at their backs, in which their brave companions were engaged. On the evening of the 20th, McDowell's force consisted of about twenty-eight thousand men and forty-nine cannon. The reconnoissance on the 19th satisfied McDowell that an attack on the Confederate front would not be prudent, and he resolved to attempt to turn their left, drive them from t
Union Mill (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
of the Commander-in-chief, dated 8th of July, 1861. commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Daniel Tyler and Theodore Runyon, and Colonels David Hunter, Samuel P. Heintzelman, and Dixon S. Miles. The Confederate force against which this army was to move was distributed along Bull's Run, This is an inconsiderable stream, which rises in the range of hills known as Bull's Run Mountains. See map on page 586. It empties into the Occoquan River about twelve miles from the Potomac. from Union Mill, where the Orange and Alexandria Railway crosses that stream, to the Stone Bridge of the Warrenton Turnpike, the interval being about eight miles. The disposition of the Confederate forces was as follows:-- Ewell's brigade occupied a position near the Union Mill Ford, and was composed of the Fifth and Seventh Alabama, and Fifth Louisiana Volunteers, with four 12-pound howitzers of Walton's battery of the Washington Artillery of New Orleans, and three companies of Virginia cavalry. D
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