hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,436 total hits in 369 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
se was speedily so impaired, that they went wandering about, seeking in vain for willing listeners among men of character in diplomatic circles; and, finally, they abandoned their missions in disgust, to the relief of statesmen who were wearied with their importunities and offended by their duplicity: Mr. Stephens assumed the office of expounder of the principles upon which the new government was founded and was to be established. He made the occasion of a speech to the citizens of Savannah, Georgia, March 21, 1861. the opportunity for giving that exposition to the world. He declared that the immediate cause of the rebellion was African Slavery existing in the United States; and said that Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this as the rock on which the Union would split. He doubted whether Jefferson understood the truth on which that rock stood. He, and most of the leaders at the time of the formation of the old Constitution, entertained the erroneous idea that the en
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H.vention, but felt satisfied with the Constitution as it was; while Indiana instructed its delegates not to commit that State to any action uny, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Dcted by eleven States against ten. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kanassachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pote of eleven States against nine. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont-nd, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith subm
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ey were forty-two in number, and represented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. The following are the names of the delegates:-- South Carolina.--R. B. Rhett, James Chesnut, Jr., Wissippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powersngements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mamore sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchman, who emigrated to Louisiana in early life, married a woman of fortune, and finally reached a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of that State.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
lled against his Government. The Confederates, having assumed for their league a national character, at once presented their claims to recognition as such by the powers of the earth. They sent commissioners to Europe to secure formal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchman, who emigrated
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houstoonstitution, even to the full execution of the Fugitive Slave Act. Delaware simply declared its devotion to the Union, and instructed its delea, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James AMassachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, P, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolinaine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ey can freely come in on our terms. Our separation from the old Union is complete, and no compromise, no reconstruction can now be entertained. Davis was conducted from the station to the Exchange Hotel, where a large crowd, many of them women, awaited his arrival. He made a speech from the balcony or gallery to the assembled populace, while on each side of him stood a negro, with a candle, that the people might see his face. He addressed them as Brethren of the confederated States of America. He expressed undoubting confidence in the success of the revolution they had just inaugurated. They had nothing to fear at home, for they were united as one people; and they had nothing to fear from abroad, for if war should come, their valor would be sufficient for any occasion. The inaugural ceremonies took place at noon on the 18th, February. upon a plat-form erected in front of the portico of the State House. Davis and Stephens, with the Rev. Dr. Manly, riding in an open barouch
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powers, W. B. Ochiltree. For days heavy rains had been flooding the whole State House at Montgomery. region between the Savannah and Tombigbee Rivers, damaging railways, and making traveling perilous. The train that conveyed Stephens, and Toombs, and T. R. Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, and Withers, and Rhett, of South Carolina, was thrown from the track between West Point and Montgomery, a nd badly broken up. Everybody was frightened, but nobody was hurt; and at a late hour, on the 4th, these leaders in conspiracy entered Montgomery. Not long afterward the Convention assembled in the Legislative Hall, around which were hung, in unseemly intermingling, the portraits of George Washington and John C. Calhoun; of Andrew Jackson and William L. Yancey; of General Marion, Henry Clay, and the historian of Alabama, A. J. Pickett. Robert W. Barnwell, of South Caroli
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tary and Naval Committees to report plans for the organization of an army and navy, and to make provision for the officers in each service who had deserted their flag and were seeking employment from the Confederates at Montgomery. Preparations were now February 15, 1861. made for the reception and inauguration of Davis. He was at his home near Vicksburg when apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February 15. At Opelika, two companies from Columbus, Georgia, joined the escort. He reached his destination at ten o'clock at night, where he was rec
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ned them. He counseled them to assume all responsibility necessary to the accomplishment of the work they had entered upon. With a consciousness of the justice of our cause, he said, and with confidence in the guidance and blessings of a kind Providence, we will this day inaugurate for the South a new era of peace, security, and prosperity. As the delegates assumed to be representatives of Sovereign States, it was agreed that all votes should be taken by States. Having adopted rules for ththe old Constitution, entertained the erroneous idea that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. They erroneously believed that in the order of Providence the institution would be evanescent and pass away. That, he said, was the prevailing idea of the fathers, who rested upon the false assumption put forth in the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal. This was in flat co
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
of the Virginia politicians suspected instructions to Massachusetts and New York delegates, 236. other delegates instructenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Harris. Massachusetts.--John Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, e outset was candid, if not modest and conciliatory. Massachusetts instructed its delegates to confer with the General Govrrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; C. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Denst eight. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, I. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delawarrancis Adams, with much severity of language.--Springfield (Mass.) Republican, January 23, 1861. and Lieutenant-General Scott
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...