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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
that most lamentable and pregnant error of the attack on Fort Sumter had been committed, says Professor Morse, in a letter toith ludicrous solemnity laid aside his judicial robes at Charleston, See page 48. sent word that he would like to put thee from the beginning. From the hour when Anderson entered Sumter, See page 129. they had counseled its seizure. In the tes there as cowards and imbeciles. If the people of Charleston, he said, should burn the whole crew in effigy, I should Mr. Memminger. One of them was from some young women of Charleston, and was composed of a blue cross on a red field, with ssion from a. gentleman of taste and skill in the city of Charleston, who offers another model, which embraces the same idea usurpers at Montgomery. It declared February 14. that Fort Sumter belonged to South Carolina alone. It was the pet victimrts, said the Mercury, to obtain peaceable possession of Fort Sumter, and a submission, for two months, to the insolent milit
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
15, 1861. made for the reception and inauguration of Davis. He was at his home near Vicksburg when apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convens face was thin and much wrinkled; one eye was sightless, and the other was dark and piercing. He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in early boyhood. He was educated at the Military John H. Reagan. Academy at West Point, on the Hudson River; served under his father-in-law, General Taylor, in the war with Mexico; occupied a seat in the National Senate, and was a member of President Pierce's Cabinet, as Secretary of War. He was a man of much ability, and consid
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
on of the people, met in the State House at Montgomery, in Alabama (a city of sixteen thousand inhabitants, on the Alabama Riented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. The following are, Augustus B. Wright, Thomas R. R. Cobb, Augustus Keenan. Alabama.--Richard W. Walker, Robert H. Smith, Colin J. McRae, Johnancey; of General Marion, Henry Clay, and the historian of Alabama, A. J. Pickett. Robert W. Barnwell, of South Carolina, wasans seem to have been special objects of Rhett's dislike. Alabama, he said, has the meanest delegation in this body. There resented with highly commendatory words by Mr. Chilton, of Alabama. They were sent in almost daily from various parts of the was Walker, whose social and professional position in northern Alabama was inferior to but few. Reagan was a lawyer of abilints there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia;
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chostates against ten. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tennesse Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania Rhode Islaad, Tennessee, Virginia. Kansas--13. Mr. Seddon then offered his substitute. It was rejected by a vote of sixteen States against four. The four StatePennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith submitted, and respectfully request that your honorable body will submit it to conv
Opelika (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
pprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February 15. At Opelika, two companies from Columbus, Georgia, joined the escort. He reached his destination at ten o'clock at night, where he was received with unbounded enthusiasm. Cannon thundered a welcome, and the shouts of a vast multitude filled his ears. At the railway station he was formally received, and made a speech, in which he briefly reviewed the then position of the South, and said the time for compromises had passed. We are now determined, he said, to maintain our position, and make all who op
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nspirators utterly disregarded the will of the people. On the same day, the Convention commenced preparations for war, by instructing the Military and Naval Committees to report plans for the organization of an army and navy, and to make provision for the officers in each service who had deserted their flag and were seeking employment from the Confederates at Montgomery. Preparations were now February 15, 1861. made for the reception and inauguration of Davis. He was at his home near Vicksburg when apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
astened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February 15. At Opelika, two companies from Columbus, Georgia, joined the escort. He reached his destination at ten o'clock at night, where he was received with unbounded enthusiasm. Cannon thundered a welcome, and the shouts of a vast multitude filled his ears. At the railway station he was formally received, and made a speech, in which he briefly reviewed the then position of the South, and said the time for compromises had passed. We are now determined, he said, to maintain our position, and make all who oppose us smell Southern powder and
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 10
onfederates, having assumed for their league a national character, at once presented their claims to recognition as such by the powers of the earth. They sent commissioners to Europe to secure formal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchman, who emigrated to Louisiana in early life, married
France (France) (search for this): chapter 10
Government. The Confederates, having assumed for their league a national character, at once presented their claims to recognition as such by the powers of the earth. They sent commissioners to Europe to secure formal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchman, who emigrated to Louisiana in
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuelssociation of delegates from such States, and to report to the Legislature. Rhode Island said:--Agree, if practicable, upon some amicable adjustment of present diffi, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; Nentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. On the same day, Mr. Guthrie's majority reportentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. When these substitutes were thus disposed of, enting the following States:--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virgin
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