hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,436 total hits in 369 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ce movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. Assembling of the Peace Conventionhad been flooding the whole State House at Montgomery. region between the Savannah and Tombigbee counseled its seizure. In the Convention at Montgomery, Rhett urged that policy with vehemence, andConstitution declared that the Convention at Montgomery was a Congress, vested with all the legislatwhen it was unfurled over the State House at Montgomery. The first assumption of sovereignty on t seeking employment from the Confederates at Montgomery. Preparations were now February 15, 1861apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way othe Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. Februarytting agents to assist >the white House at Montgomery. him in his nefarious work, and ostentatiouthern steel, Jefferson Davis's speech at Montgomery. See page 257. mankind were plainly notifi[6 more...]
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfieldirginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Tennessee, F. R. Zollicoffer; Min the District of Columbia, without the consent of Maryland and the slaveholders concerned; and, in case of thre, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsre, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsmpshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennscut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Min the District of Columbia, without the consent of Maryland, and without the consent of the owners, or making siness of the Convention, when Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland, one of the leading members of that body, asked an
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. estly urged the adoption of the Crittenden Compromise. Pennsylvania declared its willingness to make any honorable concessiw York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Sm, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. On the same, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania Rhode Islaad, Tennessee, Virginia. Kansas--13. Mr. Sedd, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. When these ome modifications, was adopted. Then T. E. Franklin of Pennsylvania, moved, as the sense of the Convention, that the highessetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennesse
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tucky, who offered a resolution that a committee of one from each State be appointed by the delegates thereof, to be nominated to the President of the Convention, and to be appointed by him, to whom should be referred the resolutions of the State of Virginia, and the other States represented, and all propositions for the adjustment of existing difficulties between the States; the committee to have authority to report what it might deem right, necessary, and proper, to restore harmony and preserffered a preamble to the propositions agreed to, which was adopted; The following is Mr. Guthrie's plan, as adopted, with the preamble:-- To the Congress of the United States:-- The Convention assembled upon the invitation of the State of Virginia, to adjust the unhappy differences which now disturb the peace of the Union and threaten its continuance, make known to the Congress of the United States, that their body convened in the city of Washington on the 4th instant, and continued
Pacific Ocean (search for this): chapter 10
ive. were yet ringing in the ears of the people, and his present attitude needed explanation. He thought it prudent not to attempt any explanation, and simply remarked: It is sufficient for me to say, that it may be deemed questionable if any good citizen can refuse to discharge any duty which may be assigned him by his country in her hour of need. At Milledgeville, in November, See page 54. Mr. Stephens's vision of his c country embraced the whole Republic, from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean, and from the region of ice to the region of perpetual bloom, with a population of more than thirty millions. At Montgomery, in February--ninety dayslater — he saw his country dwarfed to the insignificant area of six Cotton-producing States on the coast, with a population of four millions five hundred thousand, nearly one-half of whom were bond-slaves, and a seventh (Texas) just marching up to join the sad assemblage of recusants. After the election of Davis and Stephens, the Convent
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ohn Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.- White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virgini rejected by eleven States against ten. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delawcted by a vote of thirteen States against eight. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiy a vote of eleven States against nine. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, irginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith submitted, and respectfully reques
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Robert H. Smith, Colin J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powers, W. B. Ochiltree. For days heavy rains had been flooding the whole State House at Montgomery. region between the Savannah and Tombigbee Rivers, damaging railways, and making traveling perilous. The train that conveyed Stephens, and Toombs, and T. R. Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, and Withers, and Rhett, of South Carolina, was thrown from the track between West Point and Montgomery, a nd badly broken up. Everybody was frightened, but nobody was hurt; and at a late hour, on the 4th, these leaders in conspiracy entered Montgomery. Not long afterward the Convention assembled in the Legislative Hall, around which
Hudson (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
profit. Jefferson Davis was about fifty-four years of age at the time we are considering. His person was sinewy and light, a little above the middle hight, and erect in posture. His features were regular and well-defined; his face was thin and much wrinkled; one eye was sightless, and the other was dark and piercing. He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in early boyhood. He was educated at the Military John H. Reagan. Academy at West Point, on the Hudson River; served under his father-in-law, General Taylor, in the war with Mexico; occupied a seat in the National Senate, and was a member of President Pierce's Cabinet, as Secretary of War. He was a man of much ability, and considerable refinement of manner when in good society. As a politician, he was utterly unscrupulous. In public life, he was untruthful and treacherous. He was not a statesman, nor a high-toned partisan. He was calm, audacious, reticent, polished, cold, sagacious, rich in
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
l wing of the Anti-slavery party, in an address in Boston, on the Political lessons of the hour, declared himself to be a disunion man, and was glad to see South Carolina and other Slave-labor States had practically initiated a disunion movement. He hoped that all the Slave-labor States would leave the Union, and not stand upon the order of their going, but go at once. He denounced the compromise spirit manifested by Mr. Seward and Charles Francis Adams, with much severity of language.--Springfield (Mass.) Republican, January 23, 1861. and Lieutenant-General Scott, who knew what were the horrors Winfield Scott in 1865. of war, seems to have contemplated this alternative without dread. In a letter addressed to Governor Seward, on the day preceding Mr. Lincoln's inauguration, March 3, 1861. he suggested a limitation of the President's field of action in the premises to four measures, namely:--1st, to adopt the Crittenden Compromise; 2d, to collect duties outside of the ports of s
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
esented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. Tarnwell, C. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.--Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Benjamin H. Hill, Alet conveyed Stephens, and Toombs, and T. R. Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, and Withers, and Rhett, of South Caroanized by the appropriate choice of Howell Cobb, of Georgia, as presiding officer. Johnson F. Hooper, of Montgumber) for President, and Alexander H. Stephens, of Georgia, the same number, for Vice-President. The announceade on the 16th of February, when J. M. Waldron, of Georgia, asked leave to file a caveat and drawings, settingssistant Secretary of State, and Philip Clayton, of Georgia, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. He offered J few years the junior of Davis, having been born in Georgia in 1812. He had climbed to distinction from obscurA. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...