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Willie P. Harris (search for this): chapter 10
Richard W. Walker, Robert H. Smith, Colin J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E.arry, and McRae. Commercial Affairs.--Messrs. Memminger, Crawford, Martin, Curry, and De Clouet. Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, T. R. Cobb, and Harris. Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, and Owens. Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Keenan, and Anderson. Postal Affaiegate from each State, was appointed to report upon a device for a national flag and seal. The Committee consisted of Messrs. Shorter, Morton, Bartow, Sparrow, Harris, and Miles. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, offered a resolution to instruct the Committee to report a design for a flag as similar as possible to that of the United
onfederate Government for a patent was made on the 16th of February, when J. M. Waldron, of Georgia, asked leave to file a caveat and drawings, setting forth an improvement he had made in railroad switches. and Printing. The most important committees were constructed as follows:-- Foreign Affairs.--Messrs. Rhett, Nisbett, Perkins, Walker, and Keitt. Finance.--Messrs. Toombs, Barnwell, Kenner, Barry, and McRae. Commercial Affairs.--Messrs. Memminger, Crawford, Martin, Curry, and De Clouet. Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, T. R. Cobb, and Harris. Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, and Owens. Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Keenan, and Anderson. Postal Affairs.--Chilton, Hill, Boyce, Harrison, and Curry. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, was made Chairman of the Committee on Patents and Copyrights — an almost <*>seless office. All the laws of the United States, not incompatible with the new order of things, were cont
William P. Fessenden (search for this): chapter 10
uld secure pacification, the great object sought. The Legislatures of most of the States were in session when the proposition went forth, and the response was so general and so prompt, that delegates from twenty-one States--fourteen of them Free-labor and seven of them Slave-labor States--appeared in the Convention. Some of the delegates were then members of Congress, both of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The following are the names of the delegates:-- Maine.--William P. Fessenden, Lott M. Morrill, Daniel E. Somes, John J. Perry, Ezra B. French, Freeman H. Morse, Stephen Coburn, Stephen C. Foster. New Hampshire.--Amos Tuck, Levi Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland Hall, Lucius E. Chittenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Harris. Massachusetts.--John Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, Theophilus P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W
Charles J. McCurdy (search for this): chapter 10
ephen C. Foster. New Hampshire.--Amos Tuck, Levi Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland Hall, Lucius E. Chittenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Harris. Massachusetts.--John Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, Theophilus P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuel G. Arnold. Connecticut.--Roger S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, Wil
John Tyler President (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. Assembling of the Peace Convention at Washington City, 235. Sincerity of the Virginia politicians suspected instructions to Massachusetts and New York delegates, 236. other delegates instructed John Tyler President of the Convention, 237. Mr. Guthrie's report, 238. other propositions, 239. adoption of Guthrie's report, 240. Reverdy Johnson's resolution proposed articles of amendment, 241. action of Congress on compromises, 242. the people and the failure of the Peace Conference, 243. Tyler's treachery General Scott's desire for Peace indicated, 244. his letter to Mr. Seward Professor Morse's plan for reconciliation, 245. meeting of conspirators at Montgomery, 248. policy of South Carolinians a Confederacy of seceded States proposed, 250. a Provisional Constitution adopted, 251. South Carolinians rebellious Jefferson Davis elected President, and Alexander H. Stephens Vice-President o
W. S. Wilson (search for this): chapter 10
. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.--Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Benjamin H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, Francis Barbour, Martin J. Crawford, E. A. Nisbett, Augustus B. Wright, Thomas R. R. Cobb, Augustus Keenan. Alabama.--Richard W. Walker, Robert H. Smith, Colin J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powers, W. B. Ochiltree. For days heavy rains had been flooding the whole State House at Montgomery. region between the Savannah and Tombigbee Rivers, damaging railways, and making traveling perilous. The train that conveyed Stephens, and Toombs, and T. R. Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, and Withers, and Rhett, of South Carolina, was thrown from the track between
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 10
lican, January 23, 1861. and Lieutenant-General Scott, who knew what were the horrors Winfield Scott in 1865. of war, seems to have contemplated this alternative without dread. In a letter addressed to Governor Seward, on the day preceding Mr. Lincoln's inauguration, March 3, 1861. he suggested a limitation of the President's field of action in the premises to four measures, namely:--1st, to adopt the Crittenden Compromise; 2d, to collect duties outside of the ports of seceding States, or ter to Mr. Seward was read to a large public meeting of the friends of Horatio Seymour, during the canvass of that leader for the office of Governor of New York. The letter was used as an implied censure of the policy of the Administration of Mr. Lincoln. General Scott, in vindication of himself, then published a Report on the public defenses, which he had submitted to Mr. Buchanan before he left office, which occasioned a spicy newspaper correspondence between these venerable men. See Nationa
Stephen T. Logan (search for this): chapter 10
.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by formal resolutions of the appointing power or by informal expressions of opinion. Much caution was exercised, because there were well-grounded suspicions that
Thomas J. Stryker (search for this): chapter 10
r S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A. Seddon. North Car
James W. Grimes (search for this): chapter 10
rles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by formal resolutions of the appointing power or by informal expressions of opinion. Much caution was exercised, because there were well-grounded suspicions that the Virginia politicians, who had proposed the Convention, were adroitly playing into the
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