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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
an, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. d received permission to commit it to proposed measures. Illinois wished it to be understood that its willingness to conferhomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel Mected by eleven States against ten. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampse of thirteen States against eight. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vervote of eleven States against nine. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampsh Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith submie Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Congress to call a convention of the State
Winnsboro (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
gloried more a thousand times in the Palmetto flag of his State. He had regarded, from his youth, the Stars and Stripes as the emblem of oppression and tyranny. This bold conspirator was so warmly applauded, that menaced Brooke, at the suggestion of a friend, withdrew his motion. W. W. Boyce, of South Carolina, who had been a member of the National Congress for seven years, presented a model for a flag, which he had received, with a letter, from a woman of his State (Mrs. C. Ladd, of Winnsboroa), who described it as tri-colored, with a red union, seven stars, and the crescent moon. She offered her three boys to her country ; and suggested Washington Republic as the name of the new nation. Many members liked the suggestion, but the more radical men, like Rhett and Toombs, opposed it, probably because it might have such strong associations with the old Government as to cause a desire for reconstruction. So powerful became the feeling in the Convention in favor of the name of W
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Thomas Ruffin, David S. Reid, D. M. Barringer, J. M. Morehead. Tennessee.--Samuel Milligan, Josiah M. Anderson, Robert L. Caruthers, Thomawith the Crittenden Compromise, according to the Virginia model. Tennessee was willing to adjust all difficulties by the same process, but wes A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Tennessee, F. R. Zollicoffer; Missouri, A. W. Doniphan. and the subjects lari, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. On the same day, Mr. Guthrie's majority reporte five that voted for it were Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee. and Virginia. Mr. Tuck then offered his resolutions as a substiri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--11. When these substitutes were thus disposed of, rsey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They
Tombigbee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Colin J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powers, W. B. Ochiltree. For days heavy rains had been flooding the whole State House at Montgomery. region between the Savannah and Tombigbee Rivers, damaging railways, and making traveling perilous. The train that conveyed Stephens, and Toombs, and T. R. Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, and Withers, and Rhett, of South Carolina, was thrown from the track between West Point and Montgomery, a nd badly broken up. Everybody was frightened, but nobody was hurt; and at a late hour, on the 4th, these leaders in conspiracy entered Montgomery. Not long afterward the Convention assembled in the Legislative Hall, around which were hung, in un
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F.r amending the Constitution for the purpose. Kentucky would be satisfied with the Crittenden Comproconclusion of this address, Mr. Wickliffe, of Kentucky, offered a resolution that the Convention sho the Convention was opened by Mr. Guthrie, of Kentucky, who offered a resolution that a committee ofna, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Te proposed that the several States should join Kentucky in this request. to consider amendments to thmpshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Caroliaryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kanhat whereas the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Cong other was dark and piercing. He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in ea[5 more...]
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Gto do all in their power for its preservation. Ohio was willing to meet its fellow States in conventhe presiding officer, and Crafts J. Wright, of Ohio, son of one of the delegates from that State, aey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; IllinoiMaryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tennessee, VirginiMaryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania Rhode Islaad, Tennessee, VirginiaMaryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virgini North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have apjourned. During the session, a delegate from Ohio, the venerable John C. Wright, then seventy-sevointed Secretary to the Convention, returned to Ohio with the remains of his father, and J. H. Pules[1 more...]
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, t an honorable settlement of the national difficulties. New Jersey earnestly urged the adoption of the Crittenden Compromisecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomaansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Tenne. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania Rhode Islaad, Tennesermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennent, Massachu setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolthat whereas the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Congress to call a conventi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Assembling of the Peace Convention at Washington City, 235. Sincerity of the Virginia politicinference, assembled in Willard's Hall, in Washington City, a large room in a building originally ertes, that their body convened in the city of Washington on the 4th instant, and continued in session alluded to. The following is a copy:-- Washington, February 22, 1861. my dear Sir:--I foundthe parade. The day is the anniversary of Washington's birth — a festive occasion throughout the hich now link together the various parts. Washington's Farewell Address to his countrymen. One day when the Peace Convention assembled at Washington to deliberate upon plans for preserving the rchives of the Confederate Government, at Washington City. It was discussed that day and a part of rchives of the Confederate Government, at Washington City. The Committee finally made an elaborate of the President of the United States, at Washington City, being white, has always been better know[4 more...]
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nd represented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. The following are the names of the delegates:-- er, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison of a President and Vice-President of the Confederacy. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, received six votes (the whole number) for President, and Alexander H. Stephostal Affairs.--Chilton, Hill, Boyce, Harrison, and Curry. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, was made Chairman of the Committee on Patents and Copyrights — an almost <* Messrs. Shorter, Morton, Bartow, Sparrow, Harris, and Miles. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, offered a resolution to instruct the Committee to report a design for a fla was dark and piercing. He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in early boyhood. He was educated at the Military John H. Reagan. Ac
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
coast, with a population of four millions five hundred thousand, nearly one-half of whom were bond-slaves, and a seventh (Texas) just marching up to join the sad assemblage of recusants. After the election of Davis and Stephens, the Convention diung ladies. They offer one with seven stars-six for the States already represented in this Congress, and the seventh for Texas, whose deputies we hope will soon be on their way to join us. He offers a flag which embraces the whole fifteen States. , as we shall observe, were gratified in their belligerent desires. On the 13th, John Gregg, one of the delegates from Texas. appeared The delegation was composed of Louis T. Wigfall, J. H. Reagan, J. Hemphill, T. N. Waul, John Gregg, W. S. Oand professional position in northern Alabama was inferior to but few. Reagan was a lawyer of ability, and was a judge in Texas when he rebelled against his Government. The Confederates, having assumed for their league a national character, at on
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