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Benjamin C. Howard (search for this): chapter 10
kton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A. Seddon. North Carolina.--George Davis, Thomas Ruffin, David S. Reid, D. M. Barringer, J. M. Morehead. Tennessee.--Samuel Milligan, Josiah M. Anderson, Robert L. Caruthers, Thomas Martin, Isaac R. Hawkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bel
William Bigler (search for this): chapter 10
his father, and J. H. Puleston served the Convention as Secretary during the remainder of the session. On the following day, one hundred guns were fired in Washington in honor of the Convention Compromise. The President of the Convention immediately sent a copy of the proposed amendments to the Constitution, adopted by that body, to Vice-President Breckinridge, who laid the matter before the Senate. March 2, 1861. It was referred to a Committee of Five, consisting of Senators Crittenden, Bigler, Thomson, Seward, and Trumbull, with instructions to report the next day. Mr. Crittenden reported the propositions of the Convention, when Mr. Seward, for himself and Mr. Trumbull, presented as a substitute a joint resolution, that whereas the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Congress to call a convention of the States, for the purpose of proposing amendments to the Constitution, the Legislatures of the other States should be invited to consider
V. B. Horton (search for this): chapter 10
in, Isaac R. Hawkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 10
of a speech to the citizens of Savannah, Georgia, March 21, 1861. the opportunity for giving that exposition to the world. He declared that the immediate cause of the rebellion was African Slavery existing in the United States; and said that Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this as the rock on which the Union would split. He doubted whether Jefferson understood the truth on which that rock stood. He, and most of the leaders at the time of the formation of the old Constitution, eJefferson understood the truth on which that rock stood. He, and most of the leaders at the time of the formation of the old Constitution, entertained the erroneous idea that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. They erroneously believed that in the order of Providence the institution would be evanescent and pass away. That, he said, was the prevailing idea of the fathers, who rested upon the false assumption put forth in the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal. This was in flat contradiction of the ext
C. M. Conrad (search for this): chapter 10
--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, A. M. Clayton, W. S. Barry, J. T. Harrison, J. A. P. Campbell, W. S. Wilson. Louisiana.--John Perkins, Jr., Duncan F. Kenna, C. M. Conrad, E. Spencer, Henry Marshall. Florida.--Jacksoa Morton, James Powers, W. B. Ochiltree. For days heavy rains had been flooding the whole State House at Montgoich they rest, and with them exhibit the highest type of civilization which it is possible for human society to reach. He was followed by Keitt, and Chesnut, and Conrad, who all made predictions of the future grandeur of the nation they were then attempting to create. On the following day, Stephens formally accepted the officeAffairs.--Messrs. Memminger, Crawford, Martin, Curry, and De Clouet. Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, T. R. Cobb, and Harris. Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, and Owens. Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Keenan, and Anderson. Postal Affairs.--Chilton, Hill, Boyce, Harr
David L. Swain (search for this): chapter 10
Constitution of the United States; that the committee consist of thirteen members; and that all propositions in reference to a provisional government be referred to that committee. Alexander H. Stephens then moved that the word Congress be used instead of Convention, when applied to the body then in session, which was agreed to. On the following day, February 6, 1861. commissioners from North Carolina ap. peared, and were invited to seats in the Convention. The Commissioners were David L. Swain, M. W. Ransom, and John L. Bridges. They came only as commissioners from a State yet a part of the Federal Union, and had no right to appear as delegates. Their object was, according to instructions, See page 198. to effect an honorable and amicable adjustment of all the difficulties that distract the country, upon the basis of the Crittenden Resolutions, as modified by the Virginia Legislature. They soon perceived that their mission would be fruitless, and they returned to their ho
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 10
pted, 251. South Carolinians rebellious Jefferson Davis elected President, and Alexander H. StephSovereignty South Carolinians offended, 256. Davis journeys to Montgomery his reception and inauguration, 257. Davis's Cabinet, 258. sketch of Davis and Stephens, 259.--Confederate CommissionerDavis and Stephens, 259.--Confederate Commissioners sent to Europe Stephens expounds the principles of the New Government, 260. On Monday, the 4t, no reconstruction can now be entertained. Davis was conducted from the station to the Exchanged in front of the portico of the State House. Davis and Stephens, with the Rev. Dr. Manly, riding ddress, the oath of office was administered to Davis by Howell Cobb, the President of the Conventioacious mansion was soon afterward provided for Davis and his. family, and it became distinguished aitle of The white House than by any other. Davis chose, from among the most active of his felloplied with places of honor and profit. Jefferson Davis was about fifty-four years of age at the [13 more...]
Robert L. Caruthers (search for this): chapter 10
Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A. Seddon. North Carolina.--George Davis, Thomas Ruffin, David S. Reid, D. M. Barringer, J. M. Morehead. Tennessee.--Samuel Milligan, Josiah M. Anderson, Robert L. Caruthers, Thomas Martin, Isaac R. Hawkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcoc
A. Wickliffe (search for this): chapter 10
ut allow him protection for his slaves, as property, while on the sea on such journey. He also proposed an amendment that should forever exclude from the ballot-box and public office, persons who are in whole or in part of the African race. He also proposed another that should recognize the right of peaceable secession. He offered his propositions as a substitute for the majority report, well knowing that they would not be adopted by the Convention. In the open Convention, Charles. A. Wickliffe, of Kentucky, proposed that that body should request the several States which had passed obnoxious Personal Liberty Acts to repeal them, and to allow slaves to cross their territory when being taken from one Slave-labor State to another. On the 18th, Amos Tuck, of New Hampshire, submitted an address and resolutions. In the former, the distractions of the country were deplored and the right of secession denied; in the latter, it was proposed that the Convention should recognize the fact
John C. Wright (search for this): chapter 10
-William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T.ident, for the dignified and impartial manner in which he had presided over their deliberations, the delegates listened to a brief farewell address from Mr. Tyler, and then adjourned. During the session, a delegate from Ohio, the venerable John C. Wright, then seventy-seven years of age, and nearly blind, died quite suddenly. His death occurred on the 13th, when his son, who had been, appointed Secretary to the Convention, returned to Ohio with the remains of his father, and J. H. Puleston s
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