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Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 10
having assumed for their league a national character, at once presented their claims to recognition as such by the powers of the earth. They sent commissioners to Europe to secure formal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchman, who emigrated to Louisiana in early life, married a woman of f
Davis journeys to Montgomery his reception and inauguration, 257. Davis's Cabinet, 258. sketch of Davis and Stephens, 259.--Confederate Commissioners sent to Europe Stephens expounds the principles of the New Government, 260. On Monday, the 4th of February, 1861, the day on which Slidell and Benjamin left the Senate, a Coaving assumed for their league a national character, at once presented their claims to recognition as such by the powers of the earth. They sent commissioners to Europe to secure formal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P.tate. Mann was a dull statistician of very moderate ability; and King was an extensive farmer and slaveholder. These men so fitly represented their bad cause in Europe, that confidence in the justice or the ultimate success of that cause was speedily so impaired, that they went wandering about, seeking in vain for willing listen
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ar, by instructing the Military and Naval Committees to report plans for the organization of an army and navy, and to make provision for the officers in each service who had deserted their flag and were seeking employment from the Confederates at Montgomery. Preparations were now February 15, 1861. made for the reception and inauguration of Davis. He was at his home near Vicksburg when apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February 15. At Opelika, two companies from Columbus, Georgia, joined the escort. He reached his destination at ten o'clock
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 10
which now link together the various parts. Washington's Farewell Address to his countrymen. On the same day when the Peace Convention assembled at Washington to deliberate upon plans for preserving the Union, a band of usurpers, chosen by the secession conventions of six States without the consent or sanction of the people, met in the State House at Montgomery, in Alabama (a city of sixteen thousand inhabitants, on the Alabama River, and over three hundred miles by water from the Gulf of Mexico), for the purpose of perfecting schemes for the destruction of the Union. They were forty-two in number, and represented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. The following are the names of the delegates:-- South Carolina.--R. B. Rhett, James Chesnut, Jr., W. P. Miles, T. J. Withers, R. W. Barnwell, C. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.--Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Benjamin H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, F
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
epresentatives. The following are the names of the delegates:-- Maine.--William P. Fessenden, Lott M. Morrill, Daniel E. Somes, John J. Pllowing are the names of the delegates who composed the Committee:--Maine, Lott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; States against ten. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes-hirteen States against eight. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--DelawareStates against nine. Ayes--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaand thirty-three commissioners, representing the following States:--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,fense, will not a shout of welcome, going up from the Rio Grande to Maine, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, rekindle in patriotic hearts
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
French, Freeman H. Morse, Stephen Coburn, Stephen C. Foster. New Hampshire.--Amos Tuck, Levi Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland delegates who composed the Committee:--Maine, Lott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crm one Slave-labor State to another. On the 18th, Amos Tuck, of New Hampshire, submitted an address and resolutions. In the former, the distticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missos--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missoticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, three commissioners, representing the following States:--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York,
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
head, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Wallarged franchises for the slaveholders; while Missouri instructed its delegates to endeavor to agreee General Assembly or the State Convention of Missouri. The Convention was permanently organized everdy Johnson; Tennessee, F. R. Zollicoffer; Missouri, A. W. Doniphan. and the subjects laid beforensas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvan Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvan voted for Seddon's resolution were Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Virginia. James B. Clay The five that voted for it were Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee. and Virginia. Mrrmont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvanirginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
phen C. Foster. New Hampshire.--Amos Tuck, Levi Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland Hall, Lucius E. Chittenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Haho composed the Committee:--Maine, Lott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Amticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Cs--Connecticut, Illinois. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--8. Noes--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Ct, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, three commissioners, representing the following States:--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania
Alabama river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts. Washington's Farewell Address to his countrymen. On the same day when the Peace Convention assembled at Washington to deliberate upon plans for preserving the Union, a band of usurpers, chosen by the secession conventions of six States without the consent or sanction of the people, met in the State House at Montgomery, in Alabama (a city of sixteen thousand inhabitants, on the Alabama River, and over three hundred miles by water from the Gulf of Mexico), for the purpose of perfecting schemes for the destruction of the Union. They were forty-two in number, and represented the disloyal politicians of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. The following are the names of the delegates:-- South Carolina.--R. B. Rhett, James Chesnut, Jr., W. P. Miles, T. J. Withers, R. W. Barnwell, C. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.--Robert
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
him to that high station. He was in an embarrassing position. His Union speeches in November and January See pages 54 to 57, inclusive. were yet ringing in the ears of the people, and his present attitude needed explanation. He thought it prudent not to attempt any explanation, and simply remarked: It is sufficient for me to say, that it may be deemed questionable if any good citizen can refuse to discharge any duty which may be assigned him by his country in her hour of need. At Milledgeville, in November, See page 54. Mr. Stephens's vision of his c country embraced the whole Republic, from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean, and from the region of ice to the region of perpetual bloom, with a population of more than thirty millions. At Montgomery, in February--ninety dayslater — he saw his country dwarfed to the insignificant area of six Cotton-producing States on the coast, with a population of four millions five hundred thousand, nearly one-half of whom were bond-slaves,
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