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John H. Reagan (search for this): chapter 10
n the 13th, John Gregg, one of the delegates from Texas. appeared The delegation was composed of Louis T. Wigfall, J. H. Reagan, J. Hemphill, T. N. Waul, John Gregg, W. S. Oldham, and W. B. Ochiltree. and took a seat in the Convention, although tecretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, as Secretary of War ; Stephen R. Mallory, as Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, as Postmaster-General. Afterward, Judah P. Benjamin was appointed to be Attorney-General. William M. Browne, late He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in early boyhood. He was educated at the Military John H. Reagan. Academy at West Point, on the Hudson River; served under his father-in-law, General Taylor, in the war with Mexent as a lawyer. So also was Walker, whose social and professional position in northern Alabama was inferior to but few. Reagan was a lawyer of ability, and was a judge in Texas when he rebelled against his Government. The Confederates, having as
William C. Alexander (search for this): chapter 10
Connecticut.--Roger S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A.
E. W. H. Ellis (search for this): chapter 10
, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by formal resolutions of the appointing power or by informal expressions of opinion. Much caution was
Daniel E. Somes (search for this): chapter 10
ject sought. The Legislatures of most of the States were in session when the proposition went forth, and the response was so general and so prompt, that delegates from twenty-one States--fourteen of them Free-labor and seven of them Slave-labor States--appeared in the Convention. Some of the delegates were then members of Congress, both of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The following are the names of the delegates:-- Maine.--William P. Fessenden, Lott M. Morrill, Daniel E. Somes, John J. Perry, Ezra B. French, Freeman H. Morse, Stephen Coburn, Stephen C. Foster. New Hampshire.--Amos Tuck, Levi Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland Hall, Lucius E. Chittenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Harris. Massachusetts.--John Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, Theophilus P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuel G
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 10
f the National Capital by increasing the military force there; and Tyler seems to have gone so far as to have given President Buchanan to understand that the appearance of National troops as participators in the celebration of Washington's Birthday, nal Anniversary by the military arm of the Government as a matter of course. From your friend, very respectfully, James Buchanan. President Tyler. The failure of the Peace Conference caused much disappointment throughout the country among a n. General Scott, in vindication of himself, then published a Report on the public defenses, which he had submitted to Mr. Buchanan before he left office, which occasioned a spicy newspaper correspondence between these venerable men. See National Inth P. Benjamin was appointed to be Attorney-General. William M. Browne, late editor of the Washington Constitution, President Buchanan's official organ, was appointed Assistant Secretary of State, and Philip Clayton, of Georgia, Assistant Secretary o
John Jay Crittenden (search for this): chapter 10
Seddon's resolution were Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Virginia. James B. Clay then offered as a substitute Mr. Crittenden's Compromise plan, pure and undefiled, without the crossing of a 't' or the dotting of an i. It was rejected by a vidge, who laid the matter before the Senate. March 2, 1861. It was referred to a Committee of Five, consisting of Senators Crittenden, Bigler, Thomson, Seward, and Trumbull, with instructions to report the next day. Mr. Crittenden reported the propMr. Crittenden reported the propositions of the Convention, when Mr. Seward, for himself and Mr. Trumbull, presented as a substitute a joint resolution, that whereas the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Congress to call a convention of- I. Throw off the old and assume a new designation — the Union Party; adopt the conciliatory measures proposed by Mr. Crittenden, or the Peace Convention, and, my life upon it, we shall have no new case of secession; but, on the contrary, an earl
F. E. Zollicoffer (search for this): chapter 10
John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A. Seddon. North Carolina.--George Davis, Thomas Ruffin, David S. Reid, D. M. Barringer, J. M. Morehead. Tennessee.--Samuel Milligan, Josiah M. Anderson, Robert L. Caruthers, Thomas Martin, Isaac R. Hawkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C
J. H. Puleston (search for this): chapter 10
the president, for the dignified and impartial manner in which he had presided over their deliberations, the delegates listened to a brief farewell address from Mr. Tyler, and then adjourned. During the session, a delegate from Ohio, the venerable John C. Wright, then seventy-seven years of age, and nearly blind, died quite suddenly. His death occurred on the 13th, when his son, who had been, appointed Secretary to the Convention, returned to Ohio with the remains of his father, and J. H. Puleston served the Convention as Secretary during the remainder of the session. On the following day, one hundred guns were fired in Washington in honor of the Convention Compromise. The President of the Convention immediately sent a copy of the proposed amendments to the Constitution, adopted by that body, to Vice-President Breckinridge, who laid the matter before the Senate. March 2, 1861. It was referred to a Committee of Five, consisting of Senators Crittenden, Bigler, Thomson, Seward, a
Peter D. Vroom (search for this): chapter 10
New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Frwho composed the Committee:--Maine, Lott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland,
Amos S. Treat (search for this): chapter 10
i Chamberlain, Asa Fowler. Vermont.--Hiland Hall, Lucius E. Chittenden, Levi Underwood, H. Henry Baxter, B. D. Harris. Massachusetts.--John Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, Theophilus P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuel G. Arnold. Connecticut.--Roger S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Tho
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