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C. P. Wolcott (search for this): chapter 10
wkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by formal resolut
s. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T. Logan, John M. Palmer, Burton C. Cook, Thomas J. Turner. Iowa.--James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel H. Curtis, William Vandever. Kansas.--Thomas Ewing, Jr., J. C. Stone. H. J. Adams. M. F. Conway. When they were not appointed by Legislatures, they were chosen by the Governors. Many of these delegates were instructed, either by formal resolutions of the appointing power or by informal expressions of opinion. Much caution was exercised, because there were well-grounded
John Ellis Wool (search for this): chapter 10
handler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuel G. Arnold. Connecticut.--Roger S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield,
Augustus B. Wright (search for this): chapter 10
t, James Chesnut, Jr., W. P. Miles, T. J. Withers, R. W. Barnwell, C. G. Memminger, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce. Georgia.--Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Benjamin H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, Francis Barbour, Martin J. Crawford, E. A. Nisbett, Augustus B. Wright, Thomas R. R. Cobb, Augustus Keenan. Alabama.--Richard W. Walker, Robert H. Smith, Colin J. McRae, John Gill Shorter, S. F. Hale, David P. Lewis, Thomas Fearn, J. L. M. Curry, W. P. Chilton. Mississippi.--Willie P. Harris, Walker Brooke, Aombs, Barnwell, Kenner, Barry, and McRae. Commercial Affairs.--Messrs. Memminger, Crawford, Martin, Curry, and De Clouet. Judiciary.--Messrs. Clayton, Withers, Hale, T. R. Cobb, and Harris. Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, and Owens. Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Keenan, and Anderson. Postal Affairs.--Chilton, Hill, Boyce, Harrison, and Curry. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, was made Chairman of the Committee on Patents and Copyrights — a
Crafts J. Wright (search for this): chapter 10
t all difficulties by the same process, but with enlarged franchises for the slaveholders; while Missouri instructed its delegates to endeavor to agree upon some plan for the preservation or reconstruction of the Union. Its delegates were always to be subordinate to the General Assembly or the State Convention of Missouri. The Convention was permanently organized by the appointment of John Tyler, of Virginia (once President of the Republic), 1841-1845. as the presiding officer, and Crafts J. Wright, of Ohio, son of one of the delegates from that State, as secretary. Mr. Tyler delivered a short address on taking the chair, in which he said:--The eyes of the whole country are turned to this assembly, in expectation and hope. I trust that you may prove yourselves worthy of the great occasion. Our ancestors probably committed a blunder in not having fixed upon every fifth decade for a call of a general convention to amend and reform the Constitution. On the contrary, they have mad
John C. Wright (search for this): chapter 10
-William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C. Slaughter Illinois.--John Wood, Stephen T.ident, for the dignified and impartial manner in which he had presided over their deliberations, the delegates listened to a brief farewell address from Mr. Tyler, and then adjourned. During the session, a delegate from Ohio, the venerable John C. Wright, then seventy-seven years of age, and nearly blind, died quite suddenly. His death occurred on the 13th, when his son, who had been, appointed Secretary to the Convention, returned to Ohio with the remains of his father, and J. H. Puleston s
William L. Yancey (search for this): chapter 10
were hung, in unseemly intermingling, the portraits of George Washington and John C. Calhoun; of Andrew Jackson and William L. Yancey; of General Marion, Henry Clay, and the historian of Alabama, A. J. Pickett. Robert W. Barnwell, of South Carolina,mal recognition by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was tYancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a sense of his wisdom or the justice of his cause. Rost was a Frenchma
F. E. Zollicoffer (search for this): chapter 10
John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. Howard. Virginia.--John Tyler, Wm. C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, James A. Seddon. North Carolina.--George Davis, Thomas Ruffin, David S. Reid, D. M. Barringer, J. M. Morehead. Tennessee.--Samuel Milligan, Josiah M. Anderson, Robert L. Caruthers, Thomas Martin, Isaac R. Hawkins, A. W. O. Totten, R. J. McKinney, Alvin Cullum, William P. Hickerson, George W, Jones, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F. Bell, Charles S. Morehead, James Guthrie, Charles A. Wickliffe. Missouri.--John D. Coalter, Alexander W. Doniphan, Waldo P. Johnson, Aylett H. Buckner, Harrison Hough. Ohio.--Salmon P. Chase, John C. Wright, William S. Groesbeck, Franklin T. Backus, Reuben Hitchcock, Thomas Ewing, V. B. Horton, C. P. Wolcott. Indiana.--Caleb B. Smith, Pleasant A. Hackleman, Godlove S. Orth, E. W. H. Ellis, Thomas C
Felix R. Zollicoffer (search for this): chapter 10
ott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Tennessee, F. R. Zollicoffer; Missouri, A. W. Doniphan. and the subjects laid before it were duly discussed, sometimes with warmth, but always with courtesy. On the 15th, Mr. Guthrie, Chairman of the Committee, made a report, in which several amendments to the Constitution were offered. It was proposed- First, To re-establish the parallel of 36° 30‘ north latitude as a line, in the territory north of which Slavery should be prohibited; but in all territory south of it Slavery might live, without interference
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