hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,197 total hits in 243 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
rictions. On the 1st of April he wrote to Lieutenant-General Scott, saying, after referring to the fact that he had been at times cut off from all communication with Washington: I think the Government has left me too much to myself. It has given me no instructions, even when I have asked for them, and I think that responsibilities of a higher and more delicate character have devolved upon me than was proper. He wrote to Adjutant-General Thomas (the successor of Cooper, the traitor), on the 5th, because of rumors from the North, and the non-reception of replies to earnest letters for advice, saying: I am sure that I shall not be left without instructions, even though they may be confidential. After thirty odd years of service, I do not wish it to be said that I have treasonably abandoned a post, and turned over to unauthorized persons public property intrusted to my charge. I am entitled to this act of justice at the hands of my Government, and I feel confident that I shall not be
ed over to unauthorized persons public property intrusted to my charge. I am entitled to this act of justice at the hands of my Government, and I feel confident that I shall not be. disappointed. What to do with the public property, and where to take my command, are questions to which answers will, I hope, be at once returned. Unless we receive supplies, I shall be compelled to stay here without food or to abandon this fort very early next week. Anderson's Ms. Letter-book. Again, on the 6th, he wrote, The truth is, that the sooner we are out of this harbor, the better. Our flag runs an hourly risk of being insulted, and my hands are tied by my orders; and even if that were not the case, I have not the power to protect it. God grant that neither I nor any other officer of our Army may be again placed in a position of such humiliation and mortification. Whilst. Anderson was thus chafing in Fort Sumter, the Government at Washington, as we have observed, was very much perplexed,
cerning the sending of supplies to Fort Sumter, was made known on the morning of the 8th. April. It produced the most intense excitement. Beauregard immediately sent the electrograph to Montgomery, already noticed, and the reply came back on the 10th, conditionally authorizing him to demand the surrender of Fort Sumter. See note 1, page 305. The demand will be made to-morrow at twelve o'clock, replied Beauregard. The news of this determination spread instantly over the city, and to the var passion into the throne of judgment. It was believed by many that this could be done only by shedding blood. Pryor and Ruffin were self-constituted preachers of the sanguinary doctrine. They were earnest missionaries; and on the evening of the 10th, while the city was rocked with excitement, a rare opportunity was offered to Pryor for the utterance of his incendiary sentiments. He was serenaded, and made a fiery speech to the populace, in response to the compliment. Gentlemen, he said, I t
a brief dispatch to the Secretary of War, saying:--Having defended Fort Sumter for thirty-four hours, until the quarters were entirely burned, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge wall seriously injured, the magazine surrounded by flames, and its doors closed from the effects of heat, four barrels and four cartridges of powder only being available, and no provisions but pork remaining, I accepted terms of evacuation offered by General Beauregard, being the same offered by him on the 11th inst., prior to the commencement of hostilities, and marched out of the fort Gold Box presented to Anderson. Sunday afternoon, the 14th instant, with colors flying and drums beating, bringing away company and private property, and saluting my flag with fifty guns. Major Anderson to Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, April 18, 1861. I am indebted for the facts concerning the occupation and evacuation of Fort Sumter, to statements made to me by Major Anderson during several interviews, and to
olonels Chesnut, Chisholm, Pryor (Roger A.), and Captain Lee, with the proposition of Walker, to Major Anderson, when the latter replied that he cordially united with them in a desire to prevent bloodshed, and would therefore agree, in accordance with the proposed stipulations, to leave the fort by noon on the 15th, should he not, previous to that time, receive controlling instructions from his Government, or additional supplies. The messenger had arrived at one o'clock on the morning of the 12th, and the answer was written at half-past 2. At the request of Chesnut and his companions, it Le Roy Pope Walker. was handed to them unsealed. Anderson was ignorant of what his Government had been doing for his relief during the last few days. He had notice of its intentions, but his special messenger, Lieutenant Talbot, who had been sent to Washington after the notice was given, had not been allowed by the authorities at Charleston to return to the fort. Governor Pickens professed t
d, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge wall seriously injured, the magazine surrounded by flames, and its doors closed from the effects of heat, four barrels and four cartridges of powder only being available, and no provisions but pork remaining, I accepted terms of evacuation offered by General Beauregard, being the same offered by him on the 11th inst., prior to the commencement of hostilities, and marched out of the fort Gold Box presented to Anderson. Sunday afternoon, the 14th instant, with colors flying and drums beating, bringing away company and private property, and saluting my flag with fifty guns. Major Anderson to Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, April 18, 1861. I am indebted for the facts concerning the occupation and evacuation of Fort Sumter, to statements made to me by Major Anderson during several interviews, and to his official correspondence, in manuscript, which he kindly lent me, by permission of the War Department. Also, to the very interesting Ma
th the proposition of Walker, to Major Anderson, when the latter replied that he cordially united with them in a desire to prevent bloodshed, and would therefore agree, in accordance with the proposed stipulations, to leave the fort by noon on the 15th, should he not, previous to that time, receive controlling instructions from his Government, or additional supplies. The messenger had arrived at one o'clock on the morning of the 12th, and the answer was written at half-past 2. At the request ofe all that can be done, Sir. Your fort is on fire. Let us stop this. Upon what terms will you evacuate the fort, Sir? Anderson replied: General Beauregard already knows the terms upon which I will evacuate this fort, Sir. Instead of noon on the 15th, I will go now. --I understand you to say, said Wigfall, eagerly, that you will evacuate this fort now, Sir, upon the same terms proposed to you by General Beauregard? Anderson answered: Yes, Sir; upon those terms only, Sir. --Then, said Wigfall,
in token of profound respect. Charleston Mercury. After the surrender, every courtesy was extended to Major Anderson and his men by the military authorities at Charleston. When all the garrison were on board the Baltic, the precious flag, for which they had fought so gallantly, was raised to the mast-head and saluted with cheers, and by the guns of the other vessels of the little relief-squadron. It was again raised when the Baltic entered the harbor of New York, on the morning of the 18th, and was greeted by salutes from the forts there, and the plaudits of thousands of welcoming spectators. Off Sandy Hook, Major Anderson had written a brief dispatch to the Secretary of War, saying:--Having defended Fort Sumter for thirty-four hours, until the quarters were entirely burned, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge wall seriously injured, the magazine surrounded by flames, and its doors closed from the effects of heat, four barrels and four cartridges of powder only being a
g Fort Sumter, Meade abandoned his flag and joined the insurgents. He was active in the construction of the defenses of Petersburg, in the second and third years of the war. and several of them have since held distinguished positions in the Army. His little garrison, with one or two exceptions, were true to the old flag when tempted. Yet, with all these advantages, Anderson was sorely tried by the practical weakness of his Government, and the malice of its enemies. At the beginning of February, one source of much anxiety for the garrison was removed. On Sunday, the 3d of that month, the wives and children (about. twenty in number) of the officers and soldiers in Sumter were borne away in the steamer Marion for New York. The parting scenes of fortitude and tenderness were touching. Many a woman and child departed that day who, to the utmost of their ability, would have done and dared as much as their husbands and fathers. We have been seven years married, said one, and I
tions to organize a force of ten thousand men; and Milledge L. Bonham, a late member of Congress, was appointed major-general of the forces of that State. Volunteers from every part of the Confederacy flocked into Charleston; and at the close of March, not less than seven thousand armed men and one hundred and twenty cannon were menacing Anderson and his little garrison. These were under the command of Major Peter Gustavus Toutant Beauregard, a Louisiana Creole, who had deserted his flag, resWhile the ship was passing, they fired a gun and gave three hearty cheers, as a parting farewell to the beloved ones on board. The response was waving of handkerchiefs, and tears and sobs, and earnest prayers, both silent and audible. Late in March, rumors reached Governor Pickens that the garrison in Sumter would soon be transferred to some other post. It doubtless came from the Commissioners at Washington, who were waiting in expectation of that event. Accordingly, Beauregard wrote to M
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...