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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
eutenant Talbot died in April, 1862. Lieutenant Meade resigned his commission and joined the insurgents. Major Anderson performed gallant service in the war with Mexico. Captain Seymour had been an extensive traveler. His ascent of Popocatapetl, in Mexico, the highest mountain in North America, has been frequently mentioned. CMexico, the highest mountain in North America, has been frequently mentioned. Captain Foster was severely wounded at Molino del Rey, in Mexico; Lieutenant Davis was in the battle of Buena Vista; and Lieutenant Talbot had crossed the Rocky Mountains with Fremont's first expedition. enjoyed undisturbed repose. Not one of their number had been killed or very seriously hurt during the appalling bombardment of tMexico; Lieutenant Davis was in the battle of Buena Vista; and Lieutenant Talbot had crossed the Rocky Mountains with Fremont's first expedition. enjoyed undisturbed repose. Not one of their number had been killed or very seriously hurt during the appalling bombardment of thirty-six hours, when over three thousand shot and shell were hurled at the fort. Captain Foster, in his report, said that of the 10-inch shells, thrown from seventeen mortars, one-half went within or exploded over the parapet of the fort, and only about ten buried themselves in the soft earth of the parade without exploding.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ved to see the day when a President of the United States should put his hands imploringly on the shs. Speech of Jeremiah Clemens, formerly United States Senator from Alabama, at Huntsville, in ther, in the hope that the Government of the United States, with a view to the amicable adjustment ofhe course pursued by the Government of the United States, and, under that impression, my government for the surrender of the fort. But the Confederate States can no longer delay assuming actual possall private property, to any post. in the United States which you may elect. The flag which you hcommanding the provisional forces of the Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that .hd, violated his parole, and escaped to the United States, the asylum for the oppressed. Here he pur an honorable surrender. The flag of the United States has triumphed for seventy years; but to-daitle of Major-General in the Armies of the United States, again raised that tattered flag over all [5 more...]
Australia (Australia) (search for this): chapter 13
o the firing from Fort Moultrie upon Fort Sumter, the Charleston Mercury of the 13th said:--Many of its shells dropped into that fort, and Lieutenant John Mitchell, the worthy son of that patriot sire who has so nobly vindicated the cause of the South, has the honor of dismounting two of its parapet guns by a single shot from one of the columbiads, which, at the time, he had the office of directing. The patriot sire here spoken of was John Mitchell, an Irish revolutionist, who was sent to Australia as a traitor to the British Government, was paroled, violated his parole, and escaped to the United States, the asylum for the oppressed. Here he pursued his vocation of newspaper editor, first in New York and then in the Slave-labor States, where he upheld Slavery as a righteous system, advocated the reopening of the horrible African Slave-trade, joined the conspirators, and, through the newspaper press of Richmond, Virginia, became one of the most malignant of the revilers of the Govern
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
lonel Ripley; from a powerful masked battery on Sullivan's Island, hidden by sand-hills and bushes, called the Dahlgren Battery, This battery was composed of two heavy Dahlgren guns, which had been sent from the Tredegar Works at Richmond, and arrived at Charleston on the 28th of March. Five 10-inch mortars were put into the same battery with the Dahlgrens. On the same day, fifty thousand pounds of powder, sent from Pensacola, reached Charleston, and twenty thousand pounds from Wilmington, North Carolina. At that time neither Virginia nor North Carolina had passed ordinances of secession. See Charleston Mercury, April 13, 1861. under Lieutenant J. R. Hamilton; and from nearly all the rest of the semicircle of military works arrayed around Fort Sumter for its reduction. Full thirty heavy guns and mortars opened at once. Their fire was given with remarkable vigor, yet the assailed fort made no reply. The tempest of lightning, wind, and rain that had just been skurrying through t
Three Trees (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ight. Hours passed on, and all was quiet. The disappointed inhabitants made their way slowly back toward their homes, and very soon the gathering thunder-storm burst over the city. Patiently, firmly, almost silently, the little band in Fort Sumter awaited the passage of that pregnant hour. Each man could hear his own heart beat as the expiring moments brought him nearer to inevitable but unknown perils. Suddenly the dull booming of a gun at a signal-battery on James Island, near Fort Johnson, was heard, That signal-gun was fired by Lieutenant H. S. Farley. and a fiery shell, sent from its broad throat, went flying through the black night and exploded immediately over Fort Sumter. It was a malignant shooting star, coursing through the heavens like those, in appearance, which in the olden time affrighted the nations. It was one of fearful portent, and was the forerunner of terrible calamities. Then, no man was wise enough to interpret its full augury. The sound of that
Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
by sand-bags, and eleven heavy, siege-guns and Iron-clad Battery on Morris Island. several mortars had been placed in position. Beside Fort Moultrie and some small channel batteries, there were six formidable ones on Sullivan's Island bearing on Fort Sumter, some of which will be mentioned hereafter. All the forces on that island were commanded by Brigadier-General Dunnovant, and the artillery battalion was in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel R. S. Ripley, late of the National Army. On Mount Pleasant was a battery of two 10-inch mortars; and on James Island, nearer Charleston, was Fort Johnston, which had been strengthened, and was flanked by two batteries, known as the Upper and Lower. The latter was a mortar battery. Assistant Adjutant-General N. G. Evans was in command of that post. The sandy shores of Morris, Sullivan, and James Islands were literally dotted with fortifications, about twenty in number, of varied strength, armed with heavy guns, and well manned. Several of them
Cobleskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
te 2, page 41) had occurred. A colonel's commission, as commander of a volunteer regiment, was offered to Lieutenant Snyder, but he preferred his position in the regular Army. He died while assisting in the construction of the defenses of Washington City. His remains are under a neat monument in his family burial-ground, near Schoharie Court House, New York, forty miles west of Albany. On the monument are the following inscriptions-- West side.--Lieutenant Geo. W. Snyder, born at Cobleskill, July 30, 1838. Died at Washington City, D. C., November 17, 1861. North side.--A graduate of Union College; also of the Military Academy at West Point, with the highest honors of his class. Fast side.--One of the gallant defenders of Fort Sumter. South side.--Aide-de-Camp to General Heintzelman at the battle of Bull's Run. On the west side of the monument, in relief, is a military hat and sword. I am indebted to Mr. Daniel Knower for the drawing of the monument. was his chie
Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tars had been placed in position. Beside Fort Moultrie and some small channel batteries, there were six formidable ones on Sullivan's Island bearing on Fort Sumter, some of which will be mentioned hereafter. All the forces on that island were commanded by Brigadier-General Dunnovant, and the artillery battalion was in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel R. S. Ripley, late of the National Army. On Mount Pleasant was a battery of two 10-inch mortars; and on James Island, nearer Charleston, was Fort Johnston, which had been strengthened, and was flanked by two batteries, known as the Upper and Lower. The latter was a mortar battery. Assistant Adjutant-General N. G. Evans was in command of that post. The sandy shores of Morris, Sullivan, and James Islands were literally dotted with fortifications, about twenty in number, of varied strength, armed with heavy guns, and well manned. Several of them were commanded by officers of the National Army who had abandoned their flag. In addition to
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
of Lieutenants Yates and Harleston; from Fort Moultrie, commanded by Colonel Ripley; from a powerful masked battery on Sullivan's Island, hidden by sand-hills and bushes, called the Dahlgren Battery, This battery was composed of two heavy Dahlgren guns, which had been sent from the Tredegar Works at Richmond, and arrived at Charleston on the 28th of March. Five 10-inch mortars were put into the same battery with the Dahlgrens. On the same day, fifty thousand pounds of powder, sent from Pensacola, reached Charleston, and twenty thousand pounds from Wilmington, North Carolina. At that time neither Virginia nor North Carolina had passed ordinances of secession. See Charleston Mercury, April 13, 1861. under Lieutenant J. R. Hamilton; and from nearly all the rest of the semicircle of military works arrayed around Fort Sumter for its reduction. Full thirty heavy guns and mortars opened at once. Their fire was given with remarkable vigor, yet the assailed fort made no reply. The tem
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
brasures were closed with iron-clad doors; and within were three 64-pounder columbiads. This was known as the Stevens Battery, so named in honor of its inventor and constructor, Major P. F. Stevens, who was conspicuous in the attack on the Star of the West. There were two other batteries on Cummings's Point of Morris Island, the principal one being known as the Cummings's Point Battery, which was armed with two 42-pounder columbiads, three 10-inch mortars, and a 12-pounder Blakely gun from England. All of the troops on Morris Island were under the command of Brigadier-General James Simons, who had been Speaker of the South Carolina House of Representatives, and the artillery battalion was in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel De Saussure. The iron-clad battery was served under the immediate direction of Captain George B. Cuthbert. The batteries at Cummings's Point were manned by the Palmetto Guards. The spiked guns of Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan's Island, had been restored to good ord
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