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Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
-storm Fort Sumter attacked, 320. the garrison in Sumter, 321. the fire of the insurgents answered, 322. tmight to sustain that declaration. The garrison in Sumter was a standing refutation of it, and every effort w twenty in number) of the officers and soldiers in Sumter were borne away in the steamer Marion for New York.and embarked at Charleston. When the Marion neared Sumter, the whole garrison was seen on the top of the rampumors reached Governor Pickens that the garrison in Sumter would soon be transferred to some other post. It dextremely destructive and annoying. The gunners in Sumter on that side were frequently stunned, or otherwise y Lieutenant Snyder and Surgeon Crawford. Out of Sumter immense volumes of smoke rose sluggishly on the sti aid on the staff of General Beauregard) arrived at Sumter in a boat from Cummings's Point, accompanied by onefered him assistance in extinguishing the flames in Sumter. He declined it, regarding the offer as an adroit
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
to Montgomery by telegraph the next morning, and Mr. Gilchrist, a member of the Alabama Legislature, said to Davis and a portion of his Cabinet (Walker, Benjamin, and Memminger):--Gentlemen, unless you sprinkle blood in the face of the people of Alabama, they will be back in the old Union in less than ten days. Speech of Jeremiah Clemens, formerly United States Senator from Alabama, at Huntsville, in that State, on the 18th of March, 1864. The sober second thought of the people was dreaded. Alabama, at Huntsville, in that State, on the 18th of March, 1864. The sober second thought of the people was dreaded. The conspirators knew that there was solemn truth in the assertion, that the big heart of the people is still in the Union. It is now subjugated temporarily to the will of the politicians. Less than a hundred thousand politicians are endeavoring to destroy the liberties and usurp the rights of more than thirty millions of people. Raleigh (North Carolina) Banner. At two o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, the 11th of April, Beauregard sent Colonel James Chesnut, Jr., Colonel Chisholm
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
that journal. It was a 32-pound shot, and was soon afterward forwarded by Beauregard, it is said, to Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, who appears as a worthy recipient of the gift from such hands. The writer saw that shot at the police Headquarters in the old City Hall on Holliday Street, in Baltimore, when he visited that building in December, 1864, where it was carefully preserved, with the original presentation label upon it, namely, To George P. Kane, Marshal of Police, Baltimore, from Fort Baltimore, from Fort Sumter. Anderson's order for the men to remain in the bomb-proofs could not restrain them when the firing commenced. The whole garrison, officers and men, were filled with the highest Round shot from Fort Sumter. excitement and enthusiasm by non-combatant by agreement, See page 184. sprang upon the sand-bags, and with the assistance of Lyman, a mason from Baltimore, fastened the fragment of the staff there, and left the soiled banner flying defiantly, See the device on the Sumter
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
s, formerly United States Senator from Alabama, at Huntsville, in that State, on the 18th of March, 1864. The sober second thought of the people was dreaded. The conspirators knew that there was solemn truth in the assertion, that the big heart of the people is still in the Union. It is now subjugated temporarily to the will of the politicians. Less than a hundred thousand politicians are endeavoring to destroy the liberties and usurp the rights of more than thirty millions of people. Raleigh (North Carolina) Banner. At two o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, the 11th of April, Beauregard sent Colonel James Chesnut, Jr., Colonel Chisholm, and Captain Stephen D. Lee, of his staff, with a letter to Major Anderson, in which he conveyed a demand for the evacuation of Fort Sumter. The original of Beauregard's letter is before me while I write. It is as follows:-- Headquarters Provisional Army, C. S. A., Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861. Sir:--The Government of the
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
altic, the precious flag, for which they had fought so gallantly, was raised to the mast-head and saluted with cheers, and by the guns of the other vessels of the little relief-squadron. It was again raised when the Baltic entered the harbor of New York, on the morning of the 18th, and was greeted by salutes from the forts there, and the plaudits of thousands of welcoming spectators. Off Sandy Hook, Major Anderson had written a brief dispatch to the Secretary of War, saying:--Having defended Frd. Near him stands a figure of Liberty, with her right hand pointing toward heaven, and with the left hand placing a laurel crown on the head of the kneeling hero. On the front of the box was the following inscription:--The freedom of the city of New York conferred upon Major Robert Anderson by its corporate authorities, in recognition of his gallant conduct in defending Fort Sumter against the attack of the rebels of South Carolina, April 12, 1861. The citizens of New York presented to him
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ing the cipher, in script, of Major Anderson, neatly wrought in gold and. set in brilliants. On the handle were three lozenge-shaped amethysts bordered with brilliants. The scabbard is heavy gilt. At the first belt-ring are seen the arms of Pennsylvania on an escutcheon, and between them the words:--The city of Philadelphia to Robert Anderson, U. S. A., April 22, 1861. A loyal city to a loyal soldier, the hero of Fort Sumter. At the next belt-ring the arms of Pennsylvania on another escutchPennsylvania on another escutcheon. From other sources, such as societies and legislative bodies, he received pleasing testimonials of the good — will of his countrymen. Finally, the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York ordered June 6, 1861. the execution of a series of medals, of an appropriate character, to be presented to Major Anderson, and to each officer, non-commissioned officer, and soldier engaged in the defense of Fort Sumter. These were of four classes. The first, for presentation to Major Anderson, was
Palmetto (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ons, about twenty in number, of varied strength, armed with heavy guns, and well manned. Several of them were commanded by officers of the National Army who had abandoned their flag. In addition to the land-works was a curious monster in the character of a floating battery, which had been constructed at Charleston, under the direction of Lieutenant J. R. Hamilton, a deserter from the National Navy. See note 3, page 97. It was made James Simons. of heavy pine timber, filled in with Palmetto logs, and covered with a double layer of railway iron. It appeared on the water like an immense shed, about twenty-five feet in width, and, with its appendages, about a hundred feet in length. Its front, in which were four enormous siege cannon, sloped inward from the top; and the iron-clad roof, intended to be shell-proof, sloped to its outer edge. Just back of the cannon was an open space with water to extinguish the fuze of any shell that might fall into it. The powder-magazine was in
Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
und, with wet cloths on their faces, to prevent suffocation by smoke. Afterward, on the occasion of his being presented with a sword by the citizens of Taunton, Massachusetts, Major Anderson, alluding to the inhumanity of his assailants, said:--It is one of the most painful recollections of that event, that when our barracks wewere unbounded. The gratitude of the American people was overflowing; and honors were showered upon the commander without stint. Already the citizens of Taunton, Massachusetts, impressed with a sense of his patriotism and prowess, had voted him an elegant sword, the handle of which is of carved ivory, surmounted by a figure of Lription:--Deo duci, ferro comitante. Upon the handle, on a solid gold shield, was the following inscription :--Et decus et pretum recte. The citizens of Taunton, Massachusetts, to Major Robert Anderson, U. S. A. A tribute to his courage and fidelity. Acquirit qui tactus. This sword was presented to Major Anderson at the Brev
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
avy gilt. At the first belt-ring are seen the arms of Pennsylvania on an escutcheon, and between them the words:--The city of Philadelphia to Robert Anderson, U. S. A., April 22, 1861. A loyal city to a loyal soldier, the hero of Fort Sumter. At the next belt-ring the arms of Pennsylvania on another escutcheon. From other sources, such as societies and legislative bodies, he received pleasing testimonials of the good — will of his countrymen. Finally, the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York ordered June 6, 1861. the execution of a series of medals, of an appropriate character, to be presented to Major Anderson, and to each officer, non-commissioned officer, and soldier engaged in the defense of Fort Sumter. These were of four classes. The first, for presentation to Major Anderson, was six inches in diameter, bearing, Anderson's sword. on one side, a medallion portrait. of the commander, and on the other the Genius or Guardian Spirit of America rising from Fort Sumt
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
spoken of was John Mitchell, an Irish revolutionist, who was sent to Australia as a traitor to the British Government, was paroled, violated his parole, and escaped to the United States, the asylum for the oppressed. Here he pursued his vocation of newspaper editor, first in New York and then in the Slave-labor States, where he upheld Slavery as a righteous system, advocated the reopening of the horrible African Slave-trade, joined the conspirators, and, through the newspaper press of Richmond, Virginia, became one of the most malignant of the revilers of the Government whose protection he had sought and received. Lieutenant Mitchell after-ward perished in Fort Sumter. A London correspondent of the yew York Tribune, in a graphic account of this young man, says that he met him in Charleston in 1860, when he boasted of having assisted to murder an Abolitionist, by lynching. and at length the fearful cry of Fire! was raised. The barracks were burning. From the hour when the garri
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