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men, namely, seize and hold the city of Baltimore. Accordingly, on Saturday afternoon, the 4th of May, while the Commissioners of the Maryland Legislature were protesting before the President against Butler's occupation of their political capital, he issued orders for the Eighth New York and Sixth Massachusetts regiments, with Major A. M. Cook's battery of the Boston Light Artillery, to be ready to march at two o'clock the next morning. These troops were in Washington City. At dawn on the 5th, they left the Capital in thirty cars; and about two hours later they alighted at the Relay House, within nine miles of Baltimore, seized the railway station there, spread over the hills in scouting parties, and prepared to plant cannon so as to command the Washington Junction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway at the great viaduct The Relay House in 1864. over the Patapsco Valley, and the roads leading to Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. General Butler accompanied the troops, and established
utenant-General. See A Narrative of the Campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah: by Robert Patterson, late Major-General of Volunteers. The Massachusetts regiment had been joined at Springfield by a company under Captain H. S. Briggs, and now numbered a little over seven hundred men. It reached Philadelphia several hours before the New York Seventh arrived there, and was bountifully entertained at the Girard House by the generous citizens. There Butler first heard of the attack on the Sixth, in Baltimore. His orders commanded him to march through that city. It was now impossible to do so with less than ten thousand armed men. He counseled with Major-General Robert Patterson, who had just been appointed commander of the Department of Washington, which embraced the States of Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland, and the District of Columbia, and whose Headquarters were at Philadelphia. Commodore Dupont, commandant of the Navy Yard there, was also consulted, and it was agreed t
eported that he contributed largely in aid of the revolutionists; and that, among other things for their use, he manufactured five thousand pikes in his iron-works. He was arrested on a charge of treason, but the lenient Government released him. the inventor. Butler had promised Colonel Jones, of the Sixth, which had fought its way through Baltimore on the 19th of April, that his regiment should again march through that city, and now it was invited to that duty. Toward the evening of the 13th, the entire Sixth Massachusetts Regiment, and a part of the New York Eighth, with the Boston Light Artillerymen and two field-pieces — about one thousand men in all — and horses belonging to the General and his staff, were on a train of cars headed toward Harper's Ferry. Before this train was a short one, bearing fifty men, who were ordered up to Frederick to arrest Winans. When these trains moved up along the margin of the Patapsco Valley, a spy of the Baltimore conspirators started for th
Since the 19th of April, the Government had felt compelled to resort to extraordinary measures for its preservation, and much was done without due form of law, excepting what the exercise of the war powers of the President might justify. On the day after the massacre at Baltimore, the View of Fort McHenry. original dispatches in the telegraph offices in all the principal cities in the Free-labor States, received during a year previously, were, by order of the Government, issued on the 19th, April, 1861. seized by the United States Marshals at the same hour, namely, three o'clock in the afternoon. The object was, to obtain evidence of the complicity of politicians in those States with the conspirators. Every dispatch that seemed to indicate such complicity was sent to Washington, and the Government was furnished with such positive evidence of active sympathy with the insurgents that the offenders became exceedingly cautious and far less mischievous. At about the same time, t
ities in suppressing a slave insurrection, or any other resistance to law. The Governor contented himself with simply protesting against the landing of troops as unwise, and begged the General not to halt them in Annapolis. All the night of the 21st, the Maryland lay aground, and immovable by wind or tide. At dawn on the 22d, another steamer appeared approaching. It was the Boston, bearing the New York Seventh Regiment. Colonel Lefferts had become convinced that he could not pass through Bato the, town from the country, with all sorts of weapons, scarcely knowing for what purpose; while the secessionists in the city were organized for treasonable work under Colonel J. R. Trimble and others. Winans's steam-gun. On Sunday, the 21st, cannon were exercised openly in the streets. A remarkable piece of ordnance, called a steam-gun, invented by Charles S. Dickinson, and manufactured by Ross Winans, a wealthy iron-worker of Baltimore, was purchased by the city authorities at the
sured them that peaceable citizens should not be molested, and that the laws of the State should be respected. And more. He was ready to co-operate with the local authorities in suppressing a slave insurrection, or any other resistance to law. The Governor contented himself with simply protesting against the landing of troops as unwise, and begged the General not to halt them in Annapolis. All the night of the 21st, the Maryland lay aground, and immovable by wind or tide. At dawn on the 22d, another steamer appeared approaching. It was the Boston, bearing the New York Seventh Regiment. Colonel Lefferts had become convinced that he could not pass through Baltimore, so he chartered this steamer at Philadelphia with the intention of going to Washington by way of the Potomac. They embarked at four o'clock in the afternoon. April 20, 1861. Only a few officers were intrusted with the secret; the men had no knowledge of their route. Quietly they passed down the Delaware to the ocea
r the work in hand. Such impediments of civil authority, hostile feeling, armed resistance, and destructive malignity, would have appalled almost any other man and body of men; but Butler generally exhibited an illustration of the truth of the saying, Where there's a will there's a way, and the Massachusetts Eighth was an embodiment of the axiom. The engine was speedily repaired; the rails hidden, some in thickets, and some in the bottom of streams, were hunted up, and on the evening of the 23d, the troops were nearly ready for a forward movement, when General Butler formally took military possession of the Annapolis and Elkridge Railway. Governor Hicks protested against such occupation, on the ground that it would prevent the assembling of the Legislature, called to meet at Annapolis on the 26th. General Butler reminded the Governor that his Excellency had given as a reason why the troops should not land, that they could not pass over the road because the Company had taken up the
n the laws, and, if possible, protect the road from destruction by a mob. I am endeavoring, he said, to save and not to destroy; to obtain means of transportation, so that I can vacate the capital prior to the sitting of the Legislature, and not be under the necessity of encumbering your beautiful city while the Legislature is in session. This logic and this irony were unanswerable, and the General was never again troubled with the protests of the Maryland Executive. On the morning of the 24th, the combined regiments moved forward at the rate of about a mile an hour, laying the track anew and building bridges. Skirmishers went ahead and scouts on the flanks. The main column was led by a working party on the road, behind which followed a car with a howitzer loaded with grape-shot, in charge of Lieutenant Bunting. It was a hot April morning, and the men suffered much from heat and fatigue. They had a stretch of twenty-one miles to go over between Annapolis and the Junction. A sh
the crack of the rifle of the Southern guerrillas. . . . On all sides dark and lonely pine woods stretched away, and, as the night wore on, the monotony of the march became oppressive. The troops reached Annapolis Junction on the morning of the 25th, when the co-operation of the two regiments ceased, the Seventh New York going on to Washington, and the Eighth Massachusetts remaining to hold the road they had just opened. Before their departure from Annapolis, the Baltic, a large steam-ship try dictator. This power, as we shall observe presently, he used with great efficiency. The railway from Annapolis Junction to Washington was uninjured and unobstructed, and the Seventh Regiment reached the Capital early in the afternoon of the 25th, where they were heartily welcomed by the loyal people. They were the first troops that arrived at the seat of Government after the sad tragedy in Baltimore six days befere, April 19, 1861. and they were hailed as the harbingers of positive safe
ts Eighth was an embodiment of the axiom. The engine was speedily repaired; the rails hidden, some in thickets, and some in the bottom of streams, were hunted up, and on the evening of the 23d, the troops were nearly ready for a forward movement, when General Butler formally took military possession of the Annapolis and Elkridge Railway. Governor Hicks protested against such occupation, on the ground that it would prevent the assembling of the Legislature, called to meet at Annapolis on the 26th. General Butler reminded the Governor that his Excellency had given as a reason why the troops should not land, that they could not pass over the road because the Company had taken up the rails, and they were private property. It is difficult to see, said the General, how it can be, that if my troops could not pass over the railroad one way, the members of the Legislature could pass the other way. Correspondence between General Butler and Governor Hicks, April 28, 1861. He told the Govern
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